Miller Electric

Welding Discussion Forums

Home » Resources » Communities » Welding Discussion Forums
 
Miller Welding Discussion Forums - Powered by vBulletin

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    6

    Default First welder / Millermatic® 252

    I'm starting school in may and thinking about buying my first welder. So while going to school I can learn on my own welder at home. I am thinking of getting the 252. I would like to buy just one mig welder if I can. But I am not sure if this would be a good all around welder. I will be mostly welding things related to my jeep project ie: motor mounts, suspension, and axle. So i definitely want a welder that can weld more than adequately for me but still be able weld sheet metal.

    So is the 252 a good all around welder or is it mostly geared toward thicker material. Or should I get a Dvi or 212 and then later on buy a tig for thicker materials.


    thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Salem ,Ohio
    Posts
    3,911

    Cool

    A MM 212 will weld anything on your Jeep. But as my wife says bigger is better so if you can swing a MM 252 go for it....Bob
    Bob Wright, Grandson of Tee Nee Boat Trailer Founder
    Metal Master Fab Salem, Oh 44460
    Birthplace of the Silver & Deming Drill
    1999 MM185 w/185 Spoolgun,1986 Thunderbolt AC/DC
    Spool Gun conversion. How To Do It. Below.
    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...php?albumid=48

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    6

    Default

    alright but wants the thinest it can weld?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Saskatoon, Sask, Canada
    Posts
    1,270

    Default

    Well as the title states:

    Millermatic® 252
    Welds material from 22 gauge to 1/2 in thick in a single pass. Highest output in its class.

    I used to own a 251 and it was a great machine, more machine than most need at home, I think a 212 would be the way to go, although I think I would check out a Hobart Handler 210 first. Packs a big punch for a small machine, shorter duty cycle but I doubt you'd even notice.
    Last edited by c wagner; 01-20-2008 at 08:30 PM. Reason: additional info
    at home:
    2012 325 Trailblazer EFI with Excel power
    2007 302 Trailblazer with the Robin FOR SALE
    2008 Suitcase 12RC
    Spoolmatic 30A
    WC-24
    2009 Dynasty 200DX
    2000 XMT 304
    2008 Thermal Dynamics Cutmaster 52
    Sold:MM130XP
    Sold:MM 251
    Sold:CST 280

    at work:
    Invision 350MP
    Dynasty 350
    Millermatic 350P
    Retired:Shopmaster 300 with a HF-251

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    6

    Default

    alright thanks

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    20

    Default Mig Welder

    Another option would be the Passport Plus. We have both the Passport & 252 at work and side by side the passport welds just as good and gives the convenience of being 110v or 220v by just changing the plug end which is a quick change fitting. It's also portable and cheaper. JMO

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    6

    Default

    ok what about the dvi-2 is it any good? or am i better off with the passport or the 212?

    does anyone have any recommendations on any good websites to buy from

    thanks
    Last edited by conway; 01-21-2008 at 07:04 AM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    20

    Default

    I don't have any experience with the dvi-2, but you can't go wrong with either the Passport or the 252. As far as websites go, I like www.cyberweld.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Deltaville, VA
    Posts
    2,239

    Default

    Conway,

    While I don't have a MM252, I do have a MM251 and have been very happy with the machine.

    If the price of a MM252 is in your "budget", by all means, go with the larger machine. Old saying, "the large machine can be dialed down but the smaller machine can't be dialed up (beyond it's capability).

    The MM252 has "infinitely adjustable" voltage as well as wire speed, which adds to the utility, especially when dialing the unit down.

    The MM252 also is plug ready for the 30A spoolgun, which is a more robust unit than the smaller guns.

    The only disadvantage I see in using the MM252 for light (sheet metal) work is the size of the gun. The M25 is rather large for light work. The Bernard Q300 gun (which was available for exchange) is also a little large. The solution here, if it's a concern, is to pick up an extra M10/M15 gun off the internet for around $100 or so. That way you could set the smaller gun up for .023 wire and use the standard gun for .035.

    I can't remember one poster coming on the boards stating that, "I bought too big a mig". On the other hand, most people starting out, buy a small mig and then either upgrade (costly) or just eventually buy a larger unit to supplement what they already have.

    Just my .02

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    TEXAS!
    Posts
    12

    Talking



    I started using the 251 in college, and now my students are using the 252, and we love it. it will weld both thin and thick very well, and i cannot see working without it most of the time. Hope it helps.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Warning: Function split() is deprecated in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/footer.inc.php on line 82

Welding Projects

Special Offers: See the latest Miller deals and promotions.