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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    Indiana
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    541

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    Neat looking "specialty" bit. Sometimes you get less then you pay for.
    Tim Beeker,
    T-N-J Industries
    (my side bussiness)

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  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Austin, TX
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    621

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    Quote Originally Posted by KBar View Post
    It is a Dewalt set in a plastic case, they have a center point on the bits, I can't honestly say what kind they are..
    If they have a center point, they may be brad-point, which are specifically designed for wood.
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  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Lancaster, Pa
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    431

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    Quote Originally Posted by tasslehawf View Post
    If they have a center point, they may be brad-point, which are specifically designed for wood.
    A brad point is used to push into wood on your mark, these are cut and sharpened to help keep the bit from wandering on metal, almost like drilling a pilot hole. They are cobalt bits. I stand corrected though, they are called pilot point not center point. It also cuts down on lock up when you get through the metal.
    Last edited by KBar; 01-05-2008 at 12:30 PM.
    Ken

    What else is there besides welding and riding. Besides that

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  4. #24
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    Jul 2007
    Location
    TEXAS
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    92

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    i like the 135deg cle-line black oxide bits, ive got a drill doc to sharpen them back up. ive avoided the brad point since there almost impossible to sharpen.

    alot of times once ive sharpened them a bunch and the dia is getting a bit less at the bottom ill cut a inch off them grind it up on the bench grinder some and stickit in the drill doc and its good as new
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  5. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    gate city virgina
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    213

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    Quote Originally Posted by tnjind View Post
    I try to buy USA made. Not Lowes, Home Depot, Walmart etc.
    But the key is appropriate speed and feed. Once it dulls then sharpen it. Learn to sharpen bits, it sucks but need to do it. I have two small cabinets for 1/16 - 1/2" each compartment holds about a dozen to about half dozen depending on size.
    I have Used a Chinese 5/8 to punch 40 holes in 3/4 plate without sharpening because of the right speed,feed and lubricant.
    drill doctor it is the best

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    541

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    I have used a drill doctor but still prefer to do it by hand.
    Tim Beeker,
    T-N-J Industries
    (my side bussiness)

    Miller Synchrowave 350LX with tigrunner
    Esab 450i with wire feeder
    HH135 mig
    Thermal Dynamics cutmaster 51 plasma cutter
    Miller aircrafter 330 - sold
    Marathon 315mm coldsaw
    vertical and horizontal band saws
    table saw
    Dewalt cut off saw
    Sand blast cabinet
    lots of hand grinders
    Harris torch
    beer fridge

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Raymore Missouri
    Posts
    1,920

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jake View Post
    i like the 135deg cle-line black oxide bits, ive got a drill doc to sharpen them back up. ive avoided the brad point since there almost impossible to sharpen.

    alot of times once ive sharpened them a bunch and the dia is getting a bit less at the bottom ill cut a inch off them grind it up on the bench grinder some and stickit in the drill doc and its good as new
    I have the black oxide 115 piece set by CL I've had since 94......118 degrees
    I've only broken one small bit so far. Good bits!

    What do you drill that you prefer 135 degree bits over the 118 degree?
    I also have the large Drill Doctor. Love it. I still feel that one that sharpens bits by eye on a grinder with bit in hand is not going to be doing any precision drilling. Making a hole is easy. Making a precise hole in metal where you want it is another thing.
    Last edited by monte55; 01-06-2008 at 08:30 AM.
    Nick
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  8. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    National City CA
    Posts
    1,086

    Default

    Sharp bits!!!!!
    Here's what I use
    HSS (high speed steel) for just about everything. Then switch to 5%cobalt HSS drills for tougher stuff. I hate Tin coated drills because they are only coated and as soon as they go dull and you re-sharpen then there goes the coating.Tin are for production drilling not home or shop use. The advantages of Tin will not be realized until you have drilled a few hundred holes with the same drill. In a production setting Tin will make the bit last a lot longer.

    When I bust off a tap or some other tool steel part in a work piece I then go to solid carbide. They are very expensive and have a very limited use in a drill press, they are very fragile but are sometimes the only thing that will cut a hardened piece of steel.
    One skill you should learn is how to properly sharpen a drill bit. Most of you will have a bench grinder and it will be hauled to the field. Those drill sharpening gizmos are good but will most likely be left at home.
    Then learn about cutting speeds and how it affects your bits.
    Kerry
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  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Raymore Missouri
    Posts
    1,920

    Default

    I will agree that everyone who uses a drill much should learn how to sharpen
    a bit with a grinder if not only to help to understand the geometry of the cutting surface. Different bit angles for different metals etc. I was very surprised the first time I went to drill a deep hole in brass only to have the brass grab the bit with a death grip and tried to complete the hole in 1 rpm or less. I was using a 118 degree which can really grab softer metals if you're not careful.
    Anyway........the reason some say to learn to grind your bits in the field is if you break a bit. Good reason. Here's an idea........take more than one bit.

    True story..........I was helping a guy do an interior and exterior iron railing
    job at a very nice home. We are delivering the last of the exterior to install on concrete and rock. I brought the railing and he brought the tools. We had about 40 3/8" holes to drill...............he brings his Dewalt XRP hammer drill
    (cordless) and an extra battery(dead).........and 1 cheap masonry bit (dull).
    The day was not going well. Finally after he got over his baby fit, I went to my van and found a set of bits I always carry. He's good at what he does but hardly ever prepared properly. Whenever I go to a job, I have a backup on most everything I will need. It beats finding a hardware store when you're
    in the boondocks or asking the customer if you can borrow their B&D set.
    Nick
    Miller 252 Mig
    Miller Cricket XL
    Millermatic 150 Mig
    Miller Syncrowave 200 Tig
    2-O/A outfits
    Jet Lathe and Mill
    Jet 7x12 horz/vert band saw
    DeWalt Multi Cutter metal saw
    Century 50 Amp Plasma Cutter
    20 ton electric/hydraulic vertical press
    Propane Forge
    60" X 60" router/plasma table

    www.youtube.com/watch?v=jTu7wicVCmQ
    Vist my site: www.nixstuff.com
    and check out some of my ironwork and other stuff

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Wetaskiwin, Alberta
    Posts
    97

    Default bits

    I still have some of the bits left from my original set purcahsed in 1975. I ahve bought other sets since but have only bought HSS bits. They have been used in air drills, electic drills and drill presses. I believe that keeping them sharp and the correct pressure are the most important. Any oil for holes up to one inch thick material has worked well. If tapping the holes then rapid-tap is a very good product. I built my own hydraulic press at home and needed to drill 32 one inch holes through 3/4 inch material. I did not have a one inch bit at that time so I used a hole saw and a lot of engine oil. I still use the same hole saw.

    Byron

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