Miller Electric

Welding Discussion Forums

Home » Resources » Communities » Welding Discussion Forums
 
Miller Welding Discussion Forums - Powered by vBulletin

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Bristol, UK
    Posts
    9

    Default Dynasty 200DX - 1.5mm aluminium - settings

    First of all a quick hello, as this is my first post on the Miller site

    I am based in the U.K. and am a keen motorcyclist, and amateur fabricator of all things conected therewith.

    My current project is a 1989 Harris F1, here's a photo of the 'bike when I first got hold of it:



    I am rebuilding it from the ground-up, and have bought myself a Dynasty 200DX so that I can learn to weld, & fabricate some parts that I need. The next stage in the project is to build a seat sub-frame from 10mm (just less than half-inch) square tube.

    I would appreciate suggestions for some settings on the machine, to TIG weld 1.5mm (1/16th inch?) thick aluminium. I have some experience with MIG and gas welding, and have played around a bit with TIG and am making steady progress.

    Your help much appreciated,

    Regards,


    flatline
    Last edited by flatline; 01-04-2011 at 05:15 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    87

    Default

    Use the Miller calculator to get yourself in the ball park. http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...calculator.php
    You will need a lot of practice before tackling a job like that. Also, bike frames are heat treated and you may/will weaken any existing structure that you weld to.
    Kemppi Pro Evolution 4200
    Kemppi 530 wire feed with MXE panel
    Kemppi ProCool ( coming soon)
    Cigweld TransMig 210se
    Cigweld TransTig 200 AC/DC
    Hypertherm PowerMax45
    CutSkill O/A setup
    Speedglas 9000x adflow
    Speedglas 9100xx

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Bristol, UK
    Posts
    9

    Default

    Thanks for the advice mate. Fortunately the seat sub-frame bolts to the main chassis of the 'bike, so I can afford to make numerous attempts at building it without risking damage to the 'bike itself.

    Seems to be plenty of people 'viewing' my post, but only one or two guys seem to be forthcoming with advice

    Once again, many thanks


    FL

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Deltaville, VA
    Posts
    2,239

    Default

    flatline,

    The reason many have "looked at" and not responded to your thread is because they don't know where to start.

    First off, what you're proposing is NOT an easy task for an experienced tigger. For a guy "just learning" the process, it may well be a long ways down the road before it can be accomplished.

    Tig welding thin aluminum (1/16") is NOT where you want to start. Simply giving you "settings" is not going to help much. I'll give you a start point, but you need to melt a lot of coupons before you tackle the seat bracket.

    AC
    Set frequency to about 120
    Postflow set to about 8 seconds.
    Amps to about 80. (You won't need it all but control with pedal)
    1/16" or 3/32" Tungsten sharpened to a crayon point (I prefer lanthanated or ceriated)
    Balance set to 75%
    No pulse
    1/16" 5356 filler

    I'd recommend getting some 1/8" coupon material and start there. Run beads in the flat position. When totally comfortable, move on to butt joints. Then work on your filet welds. When all this is "second nature", move on to thinner and thinner material. Jumping right into thin aluminum (1/16") will be nothing but frustrating.

    Be prepared to do a lot of "tungsten sharpening". To maintain the short arc you need, you'll do a lot of "dipping" as you're learning.

    Most (and I'm one of them) would recommend starting with mild steel coupons to develop the motor skills for tig.

    I'd also recommend going up to the top of the page and clicking on the "Resources" tab. There you'll find an offer for Miller's Student Pack. This includes an excellent Tig Handbook, a good GMAW Handbook and a bunch of other useful stuff. (not sure about European shipping, but the package is $25 w/shipping in the US) Best money you'll spend on tig welding.
    Syncrowave 250 DX Tigrunner
    Dynasty 200 DX
    Miller XMT 304 w/714D Feeder & Optima Control
    Miller MM 251 w/Q300 & 30A SG
    Hobart HH187
    Dialarc 250 AC/DC
    Hypertherm PM 600 & 1250
    Wilton 7"x12" bandsaw
    PC Dry Cut Saw, Dewalt Chop Saw
    Milwaukee 8" Metal Cut Saw, Milwaukee Portaband.
    Thermco and Smith (2) Gas Mixers
    More grinders than hands

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Bristol, UK
    Posts
    9

    Default

    Hi Sundownlll,

    Thanks for the advice, really appreciate it. I understand that I'm embarking on a pretty steep learning curve - but I guess that's part of the fun.

    I have already ordered some educational materials from the resources area, and will take a look at the Student Pack that you recommended.

    I have had a couple of sheets of aluminium cut into handy 4"x2" test pieces for me to practice with, and will be making a start in the next couple of days. I'll post a few photo's of how I get on.

    Once again, thanks for your advice,



    FL

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Lodi, CA
    Posts
    1,244

    Default

    Don't forget to explore the rest of the "resources" tab, huge amounts of information available in pdf format.
    Obviously, I'm just a hack-artist, you shouldn't be listening to anything I say .....

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Bristol, UK
    Posts
    9

    Default

    OK, Student Pack ordered, along with 'TIG Welding for Dummies', and the DVD 'TIG Welding Basics'.

    Should keep me busy for an evening or two.....


    p.s. what's a 'hack-artist' ???


    FL
    Last edited by flatline; 01-05-2011 at 11:46 AM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    241

    Default

    A "Hack Artist" is American slang for someone who does poorly planned and sloppy or inferior work .Mike

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Bristol, UK
    Posts
    9

    Thumbs up progress...

    Quote Originally Posted by SundownIII View Post
    flatline,

    The reason many have "looked at" and not responded to your thread is because they don't know where to start.

    First off, what you're proposing is NOT an easy task for an experienced tigger. For a guy "just learning" the process, it may well be a long ways down the road before it can be accomplished.

    Tig welding thin aluminum (1/16") is NOT where you want to start. Simply giving you "settings" is not going to help much. I'll give you a start point, but you need to melt a lot of coupons before you tackle the seat bracket.

    AC
    Set frequency to about 120
    Postflow set to about 8 seconds.
    Amps to about 80. (You won't need it all but control with pedal)
    1/16" or 3/32" Tungsten sharpened to a crayon point (I prefer lanthanated or ceriated)
    Balance set to 75%
    No pulse
    1/16" 5356 filler

    I'd recommend getting some 1/8" coupon material and start there. Run beads in the flat position. When totally comfortable, move on to butt joints. Then work on your filet welds. When all this is "second nature", move on to thinner and thinner material. Jumping right into thin aluminum (1/16") will be nothing but frustrating.

    Be prepared to do a lot of "tungsten sharpening". To maintain the short arc you need, you'll do a lot of "dipping" as you're learning.

    Most (and I'm one of them) would recommend starting with mild steel coupons to develop the motor skills for tig.

    I'd also recommend going up to the top of the page and clicking on the "Resources" tab. There you'll find an offer for Miller's Student Pack. This includes an excellent Tig Handbook, a good GMAW Handbook and a bunch of other useful stuff. (not sure about European shipping, but the package is $25 w/shipping in the US) Best money you'll spend on tig welding.
    Hi,

    I am well impressed with Miller Electric, I ordered 'on-line' various educational materials from Miller on the 4th, and yesterday - Friday 7th january - everything arrived! ( I'm in the UK remember) - excellent service.

    Set up my Dynasty 200DX as per SundownIII suggestions, after a couple of runs I increased Hz frequency to 125, but that was it, here's my 6th 'run':



    Yeah, I know it's not a 'Stack of Dimes', but...

    That's 1/16" thick aluminium, the two test-pieces are approx 6"x1-1/12", butt welded. Reckon my travel-speed needs a little work, and there's a little contamination at the r/h end of the weld, but this is pretty much my first session in the workshop, so I'm pretty happy with this as a start

    Pedal control - an absolute must have, only just starting to get the hang of it, but already couldn't manage without it....

    Any advice on eliminating the 'crater' at the end of a weld?

    Cheers,


    FL

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    707

    Default

    Nothing like a picture to shut people up

    Seriously,
    There have been a number of posts about people repairing motorcycle frames. Think its simple? Take that aluminum that you welded (in the picture) and bend it and see where it breaks. My bet it brakes in the middle of the weld. Not your fault, just the nature of aluminum.

    Step 1, contact the manufacturer. I know with cars with aluminum frames the manufactures have spec'd out procedures to do repairs. Maybe the same with motorcycles. You want to be able to decide which filler and if there are any gotchas. If you see other welds on the frame, that's a good sign that it was at least at one time, weldable.

    As for welding parameters. I personally like lower frequencies especially if I can't get a backing plate. Higher frequencies - like 120, at least to me, seem like you go from, not enough penetration to fall out very easily. Try 80Hz. As you get closer to 60hz, the ability to keep a point supposedly goes down. In my limited experience, I have not found this to be a problem at 80-85hz. This is just my personal preference.

    As for Amps, assuming soft squarewave, no pulsing, butt weld, try 65-70 amps on the dial. If your not forming the puddle fast enough, or the puddle is too small, bump it 5-10Amps at a time. I suspect you are going to need more, especially if you don't pre-heat. But after running a couple inches, there will be more heat than you need and you will want to feather back on the power. Look at your picture, see how narrow the bead was at the start... That to me is the toughest part of aluminum, making the weld good from the beginning to the end.

    Balance of 75% is a good starting point. I would lean more to 80%.

    1/16 or even .040 Lanthicated or Ceriated should be do able. The .040 is on the edge for these settings. With my 350, I have the EP to EN ratio at 75% so I actually put even less heat into the tungsten. I know I can do .060 aluminum with .040. Not sure about the dynasty 200 - keep an eye on it.

    BTW, 3/32 is too big. I use 1/16 up to about 1/8" aluminum.

    As for the crater at the end. One last dip of the filler as you slowly back off the amps.

    For filler, You might be able to make .045 MIG wire work. But more likely you'll need 1/16.
    Con Fuse!
    Miller Dynasty 350
    Millermatic 350P
    -Spoolmatic 30A

    Hypertherm PowerMax 1000G3
    Miller Multimatic 200 - awesome portable MIG (and stick and TIG)
    Miller Maxstar 200DX - portable TIG and stick

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Function split() is deprecated in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/footer.inc.php on line 82

Welding Projects

Special Offers: See the latest Miller deals and promotions.