Miller Electric

Welding Discussion Forums

Home » Resources » Communities » Welding Discussion Forums
 
Miller Welding Discussion Forums - Powered by vBulletin

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 14 of 14
  1. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sberry View Post
    I would likely get what I could afford and was the cheapest,.

    My take is based on feeding the kids for many years solely as a welder, but I've found that in welding machines (and all other tools as well) that "the cheapest" is rarely if ever my best choice.
    The best money I've ever spent (work wise) has been on buying the highest quality tools I can afford. Again my living depends on me and my motly collection of machines/tools. They see constant, hard use in my world. Your world may differ.
    Like my Dear Old Dad used to say, you get what you pay for. That sentiment is almost lost in todays Wallmart Made in China world. But not totally thank goodness.
    For what it's worth I've bought a lot of top of the line, high quality tools used for less than the price of new cheap chineese junk. Many times at pawn shops. I've never regretted that.

    JTMcC
    Some days you eat the bear. And some days the bear eats you.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    16919 Pole Rd. Brethren, MI 49619
    Posts
    4,364

    Default

    Yes, that was poorly worded, I should have said adequate.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    18

    Default

    I dont know about 305d, but there are a lot more 305g's on the pipeline (Canadian version). One big reason is weight, DOT's are getting stupid with GVW's and road bans, and working in muskeg/soft ground heavy is not the best option. They weld pretty nice as far as I have used them for structural, however they will not burn 1/4" rod all day.... or half a day for that matter. They don't last as long as say a classic III but you can also buy 3 of them for the same price.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    16919 Pole Rd. Brethren, MI 49619
    Posts
    4,364

    Default

    There are certainly some classes of tools it pays to buy the best and others it makes some sense to be affordable and a lot of it personally I base on return on investment. Take battery tools, a homeowner type may be able to get by with a 80$ tool but the professional installer needs something better, time can be money and too cheap tool doesn't have the dependability or power needed. Tools have also changed a lot in many cases. With cheap common hand tools the quality has gone way up and the cost down, back in the day a China end wrench or adjustable wasn't worth much, now days a competitive quality 9/16 end wrench can be had for under 2$, in most cases it suffices and is a good option to a snappy at 30. They are well proven, we use them a lot.
    In some sense is a Victor Journeyman torch a better unit, well yes providing there is a legit need but a super range has about the same life expectancy and is adequate for the fence/corral crowd at 1/3 the price, a better torch wont make the operator more money.
    Specialists are obviously another matter, it makes sense that a SA is a better machine and has its place, it also cost twice what I paid for the bottom line AC/DC Weldanpower 210 I bought later but the cheap unit has done everything I ask of it as long as I need, ran 5/32 lo-hi as fast as I could chuck them in the stinger, even strapped a larger gas tank on top to give it a full day run time at one point. For me the cheap machine has been more profitable, lighter and has 6k generator that works better than advertised. If I wear it out still hasn't cost more per unit of work and has been depreciated, probably immaterial at that point and can be replaced. This is of course based on the fact it can do the work in the first place.
    This goes back to the original poster, from personal experience, if I had to do it over I would likely buy a machine that sufficed, if things went well be keeping my head up for a deal or buy up when needed.
    A machine I would certainly want in my arsenal anymore is a Maxstar 150 especially if I was doing light fab work like I did starting out, pay for itself in fuel savings in a hurry in many places. Obviously wont do much on a pipeline but in general fab work a real moneymaker especially where lots of idle time is involved.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Welding Projects

Special Offers: See the latest Miller deals and promotions.