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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    arkansas
    Posts
    781

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MMW View Post
    If you make one like the pic just use a torsion axle.
    there it is..... i like mmw answer
    welder_one

    nothing fancy, just a few hot glue guns for metal
    www.sicfabrications.com

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Zip code 71110
    Posts
    10

    Default

    I've had several variations of bike trailers over the years. The torsion axle is a very good solution, one of the most forgiving suspensions you can come up with for lightweight needs. Getting the center of gravity down lower is another big benefit to a torsion axle, many put the spindles above the frame's bottom edge which gives you the best overall ground clearance without being any more top heavy than absolutely neccessary. I don't like them for large trailers with more than one axle due to the unequalizing weight load on the same side spindle if you drive over a curb or pothole, but for a bike or utility trailer they are very good choices.

    I will never own a trailer narrower than 4 ft wheel track again, it is not worth the risk of over turning, no matter how low you can build the trailer's center of gravity. If I'm building it for a specific vehicle, I try to at least match the wheel track of the vehicle, unless I need the trailer wider due to load design. Less chance of flats since the trailer wheels run in the same groove as the car's.

    For what it's worth, we haul 2 to 3 bikes behind my wife's '05 Scion xB from time to time. (CRF50, TW200, Suzuki DR650, all together lighter than a single big cruiser). The original trailer I built was a 4x8 utility trailer, but it was all the car could do to move it in town, forget about fuel mileage, I was concerned with premature failure of the clutch etc. I decided to build a replacement that was barely more than a small T trailer like those used for hauling dune buggies and sand rails. It was too light with it's rigid axle, bounced all over the place even in town, no matter how low I set the tires. This is why I always suspension mount the axles now, no matter how light the purpose.

    I'm going to be rebuilding another rail trailer to hold 2 bikes (CRF50 and my 650 dual sport) this winter, which is going to be setup specifically to match the wheel track of our xB, mostly likely with an aluminum frame and deck.

    If you really want to reduce weights like I have in the past, pick up a set of hubs that match the wheels on your tow vehicle so you can carry a single spare for both the car/truck and the trailer. If you want to keep the cost down, a friend built his bike hauler out of a toyota Camry rear axle, gave him the added feature of a hand brake to keep it from rolling when unhitched. He used regular leaf springs for suspension and has hauled it all over the country on vacations.

    The reduced stress that even a light weight torsion axle is going to put on your bike is well worth it to me, no matter if it's a cruiser, dirtbike or sportbike.
    Here's a PDF for torsions if you haven't given them much thought yet. I buy from redneck trailer frequently, their prices are fair & they have good service/support. http://www.redneck-trailer.com/2009/A/A26-A29.pdf

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Nicollet, Minnesota
    Posts
    5

    Default T trailer

    I built a couple of these trailers as you propose with no suspension in the 70's. I used Chevy front spindles and welded them to a tube for the axle. Then just ran another tube for the tongue with a tube on each side for diaginal support. I used a fabricated channel for the wheel trough. I ran 14 inch car tires on them at 15 psi. It worked for me. I pulled the first one at speeds up to 100 mph. The first one I hauled a Yamaha 175 enduro on and the second one was for a Yamaha RD350. Just make the wheels track the tow vehicle or wider for stability. A modern torsion axle would be a good idea. I like bigger tires as they don't fall in every hole in the road. I would do it again with a torsion axle if I was into the dirt bike thing, now it is atv's for me. Good luck

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Vancouver Island
    Posts
    1

    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by Garage guy chris View Post
    Ok im sick of getting poor fuel economy towing my bike in my 4X6 utility trailer i currently have. I have been thinking of making a stripped down single rail trailer, basically a 3' axle 6.5' of channel for the tires and a short tow bar, wasn't planning on suspension just thinking of running the tires soft seeing the trailer loaded will only be like 300 to 325lbs. what im concerned about is flipping it on its side (3ft wide axle) if i hit a pothole or a raised sewer or the like at speed? what are peoples thoughts on no suspension?
    The width of a trailer gives it stability, the narrower the trailer the worse it is for tipping over. The next thing is your tongue, it has to be 1.5 time the axle width otherwise the trailer will hunt (sway back and forth).
    And third no suspension will make your trailer very unstable unless you are going to be pulling it down newly paved streets with no bumps or imperfections at all. And stay away from railway tracks, I've seen people loose their trailer and it's contents with homemade trailers with no suspension.

    You are setting yourself up for a disaster if you continue on this path, you would be better off building a wheel cup for the front wheel of your bike with a bar across to lash the handlebar down to and make it so it slides into your hitch receiver on the vehicle. These are popular with dirt bikers who don't want to go the expense of a full trailer. I've even seen a couple of bike shops use them to pick up bikes for repair around town.

    By Al

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1

    Default hard tail

    I would also put a small tortion axle an you trailer or a small air bag helper to give it something!

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Houston TX
    Posts
    240

    Default I used a single torsion axle on mine

    I needed a trailer for one bike in a big way 10 years ago.
    After looking at the crap that was for sale at $1800 plus I decided to build my own.
    I used a single torsion axle rated at 2000 lbs and 13 inch wheels that fit a Chevy bolt pattern.

    My problem was I had no where to put a trailer, so I decided to make a fold up............







    The footprint of the trailer is 30 x 62 inches and the four dolly wheels on the ramp allow me to roll it around easily.



    This trailer in the past 10 years has been coast to coast several times and from Texas to York PA and back when I picked up my new Harley Dynaglide in 2005, pulling an empty trailer from Texas to York and returning with a full trailer as shown above.
    My wife loved that trip, as we made it at Thanksgiving weekend.
    pg
    Dynasty 200 DX_set up on 3 phase
    Coolmate 3
    MM 251 w/ Spoolmatic 30A
    HTP 625 Micro Cut Plasma Cutter
    Victor O/A Rig
    Bridgeport Mill_3 phase (w/ Acu-Rite 4 axis DRO)
    10 inch South Bend Lathe_3 phase
    Baldor Double Cup Tool Grinder_3 phase
    Baldor 10 inch Buffer
    Rockwell 12 inch Disc Sander
    Cyclone 2ft X 3ft Bead Blast Cabinet
    Quincy 325 2stg- Air Compressor_3 phase
    Graymills Built-in Parts Washer
    Rockwell/Delta Planer, HD Shaper, Uni-Saw etc.


  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1

    Default Piniongear Wins

    Now that is what a talented fabricator can do.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Chicago-ish
    Posts
    282

    Default

    Torsion axle, and the wheels need to be as wide as the car. They do for me anyway, so I can see them in the mirrors when backing or backing the car to hook up the trailer.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Houston TX
    Posts
    240

    Default

    If you look close at the pic of the bike on the trailer you can see a fiberglas fishing rod attached to the right rear of the trailer.
    This is my 'vertical curb feeler'. Like an antenna.
    When I have no bike on there, I use this to guide me. Works like a charm.
    I wanted a trailer that I can roll around inside a garage, not have it take up 3/4 of a parking space.
    pg
    Dynasty 200 DX_set up on 3 phase
    Coolmate 3
    MM 251 w/ Spoolmatic 30A
    HTP 625 Micro Cut Plasma Cutter
    Victor O/A Rig
    Bridgeport Mill_3 phase (w/ Acu-Rite 4 axis DRO)
    10 inch South Bend Lathe_3 phase
    Baldor Double Cup Tool Grinder_3 phase
    Baldor 10 inch Buffer
    Rockwell 12 inch Disc Sander
    Cyclone 2ft X 3ft Bead Blast Cabinet
    Quincy 325 2stg- Air Compressor_3 phase
    Graymills Built-in Parts Washer
    Rockwell/Delta Planer, HD Shaper, Uni-Saw etc.


  10. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Toronto Canada
    Posts
    30

    Default

    Well been playing with the idea for a while and have decided to leave it alone, and just keep on towing with the 6x4 i made a few years ago, its been flawless except for some **** wheel bearings, but i tow like 4000kms a year with it so.... and the tongue folds up and acts as a front "stand" when folded, all in all it works really well

    Garage Guy Chris
    equipment:
    -Miller matic 210 w/ spoolgun
    -Syncrowave 180SD

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