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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Lumberton, NJ
    Posts
    16

    Default Tig for chassis work

    Currently putting together a 94 mustang to make into a track car and wanting to purchase a tig to do my own chassis work with (sub frame connectors, anti roll bar, coil over mounts, things like that) and wondering what would be a good machine for that? I dont plan on doing much if any aluminum right now so a DC only machine would work aswell for me. Would a diversion 165/180 or maxstar 150STH be a good machine for this or should I look for something bigger?

    Thanks
    Last edited by BB94Mustang; 08-10-2010 at 10:58 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    3,145

    Smile Diversion 180

    If I were looking in your position..... I would strongly consider the Diversion 180 for about $1700 fully outfitted... for an inverter.. sure cannot beat it... I have a Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner and a Dynasty 200DX.... both superb machines... but a lot more money than the diversion...
    just my 2cents worth
    Heiti

  3. #3

    Default

    the diversion 165 you can get for cheap right now i bought mine for 1100 new tax and argon bottle swap included the maxstar is great for DC but IF you want AL capability defiantly get the diversion 165/or 180 if you want 120 volt


    good luck on getting a machine
    Leblond Makino mills
    HAAS CNC SL-40 lathe
    American Pacemaker lathe
    wells index mill
    hydrotel rebuilt
    syncrowave 250
    diversion 165
    Miller Elite Vintage USA

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    12

    Default

    CNC where did you get a new Diversion 165 for 1100? Good price.

  5. #5

    Default

    i got it new on the crate with the red torch for 1100 and only 120 extra for the pedal at mobil industrial welding supply in placenta CA but to be honest theres a lot of business that goes to them after years of buying gas and equipment so from time to time i get a break on stuff
    Leblond Makino mills
    HAAS CNC SL-40 lathe
    American Pacemaker lathe
    wells index mill
    hydrotel rebuilt
    syncrowave 250
    diversion 165
    Miller Elite Vintage USA

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Evansville, IN
    Posts
    2,348

    Default

    I have the D200DX and love it. Bought above my pay grade when I bought it,,, Never regretted the expense either. I currently have it, a coolmate 4, and "I" head watercooled torch and a thumb control that is an odd duck that I love made by mastercraft I think. Also have a DC only rig with a gas cooled torch and it is great for SS and Higher amperage as its a 300 amp power source. Never short on the tools to build the project correctly.

    Peace,
    Paul

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Lumberton, NJ
    Posts
    16

    Default

    After thinking about it a bit and with the current state of my car/project I think a mig would be the better choice as of right now and may hold off on the tig til later on. What would be your suggestions as to what mig to go with? Was looking at the MM212 and PM216. Would these machines be good for my intended usage (rollcage would be done with a tig later on) or should i be looking at a 250+ amp machine? Which is the better machine?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    3,145

    Default

    Even though a tig is more expensive and requires more skill... I would vote that you go for one of those first... your skillset will be much stronger in the longrun.... mig is percieved like a hot glue gun... even though that is not true... LEARN tig first!!! then the rest of your adventure will be much more fulfilling... know some dimestore experts will argue... but they are wrong...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Lumberton, NJ
    Posts
    16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by H80N View Post
    Even though a tig is more expensive and requires more skill... I would vote that you go for one of those first... your skillset will be much stronger in the longrun.... mig is percieved like a hot glue gun... even though that is not true... LEARN tig first!!! then the rest of your adventure will be much more fulfilling... know some dimestore experts will argue... but they are wrong...
    I've done some tig and after having done it I hate mig welding and would much rather tig over mig but figured mig would be the better choice for where im at with my project but with the money im looking to spend on a mig im not far from what it be for a nice tig machine.

    Which tig would you suggest between a precision tig 225 vs a syncowave 200?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Corona, CA
    Posts
    213

    Default

    This is just my .02 but I would go with a mig first. You want to do a bunch of fabrication...such as sub frame connectors, a cage, etc. I can vouch for the fact that trying to overhead tig, while laying on your back, operating a pedal, is NOT fun. Not to mention undercoating is the biggest PITA to clean off of a car.
    (Tip: Use dry ice where you can, a wire wheel where you cant, and wipe with diesel on a rag to get the rest of the tar residue. Then clean with acetone. DONT have open flame near by when you do any of the flammable bits)

    I worked at a racing fab shop as an apprentice for a long while when I was going to school. Mig will do the cage, the fab work, it fills holes in sheet metal easily, and you can definitely fill a gap (god forbid you have one or two of those when you fabricate something...) if you need to. I have burned lots of wire welding in cage pads, and that is something I would definitely not want to do with a tig.

    I have an MM180...I just built a 1/4" plate bumper for a 92 bronco, I've used it for cage work, I've welded seat mounts into various cars (including a few of my own) And it has never let me down. There are times I wish for more duty cycle...but do you really see yourself welding 1/4, 5/16, or 3/8ths often enough to need it?

    When I got MY first welder (not a shop welder) it was the mm180, and I picked up a spoolmate 100. That combo worked well for my projects and made me a bunch of money on side jobs. Like I said, just my .02 In the end, it is your choice, but take a good long look at what you REALLY need first.
    Precision is only as important as the project...if you're building a rocket ship...1/64" would matter. If you're building a sledgehammer...an 1/8" probably wont.

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