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Thread: Aluminum Tiging

  1. #11

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    Thank you guys,

  2. #12
    Join Date
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    arkansas
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    Default

    i would also like to add that on an inverter machine, the tungsten doesnt need to be balled on the end. it needs to be ground to a point much like you were using dc on steel.
    welder_one

    nothing fancy, just a few hot glue guns for metal
    www.sicfabrications.com

  3. #13
    Join Date
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    Grande Prairie, Alberta Canada
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by welder_one
    On an inverter machine, the tungsten needs to be ground to a point much like you were using dc on steel.
    I'll have to give that a try sometime Stan. I used Pure Tungsten with a balled end with a Lincoln Square Wave Tig 175, and a PrecisionTig 225 on AC with excellent results. The salesman from the LWS came by the shop with the regional Lincoln Electric Canada rep. when we bought the PT225, they even set it up for us so we could keep working. The Lincoln rep never once said to use Pure Tungsten on AC with a sharpened end.

    Last time I checked, the Pure Tungsten forms a balled up end when it heats up anyway.

    If I get to do Aluminum with an inverter again, I'll give it a try.

    Later,
    Jason

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Appleton WI
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    59

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    Quote Originally Posted by Black Wolf View Post
    I'll have to give that a try sometime Stan. I used Pure Tungsten with a balled end with a Lincoln Square Wave Tig 175, and a PrecisionTig 225 on AC with excellent results. The salesman from the LWS came by the shop with the regional Lincoln Electric Canada rep. when we bought the PT225, they even set it up for us so we could keep working. The Lincoln rep never once said to use Pure Tungsten on AC with a sharpened end.

    Last time I checked, the Pure Tungsten forms a balled up end when it heats up anyway.

    If I get to do Aluminum with an inverter again, I'll give it a try.

    Later,
    Jason
    I use a square wave Tig 175 at work. I got decent results with a pointed 3/32 pure tungsten. At least as good as I'm gonna get given my limited GTAW experience. I tried twice, The first time was repairing a cracked trim bracket for a co-worker when he crashed his crotch rocket. The secong time was on some 1/16 (I think) AL scrap, practicing for a repair to a fiberglass truck lid frame. The only way I could keep a puddle, It would burn through after a few seconds. Any info would be greatly appreciated. The frame I have to weld is about 1/16 thick.

  5. #15
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    Nov 2006
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    Lake of the Ozarks MO
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    Wink Attention: cave men

    If you old schoolers would try using lanthanated or ceriated and sharpen it on those square-wave machines you just might like the results.
    I have went to the same style on everything now whether it be engine drive, transformer or inverter. Just start using the balance knob.
    I'm currently using gold band lanthanated and when that is used up will go to the blue.
    Pure is outdated pretty much for any purpose even tho many still cling to it it is mainly because they are reluctant to try new things as it is still working for them. I've yet to see someone say that they are going back to pure but I am certain there are a few out there.
    Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
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  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Southern Louisiana
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    421

    Default welding aluminum

    try this site.
    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...ur-skills/tig/
    with the inverter tig machines Miller recommends lanthanated for the good arc starting and low burn off rate. The same sized electrode that is alloyed will carry more amps than the pure and last longer. The days of a balled electrode are coming to an end very quickly, it is just hard for some to let go of the "old ways".

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    southern B.C
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    Default ceriated not pure tung?

    shadetree said ceriated not pure tung when using inverter. Why? Looking at purchasing a Dynasty 350 just wondering about that tung thing.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Olive Branch Ms
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    129

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    I am completely sold on the Lanth Tung,, Also, The #1 problem I had with alum was a lack of good cleaning. You have GOT to get that oxidation off or alum will get really aggravating using the tig process. Forget a hand brush too. Use a stainless brush on a 4" grinder. Just my .02 cents worth.
    Webb's Welding and Repair LLC
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  9. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    Ocean City, Maryland
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    Default

    I've done quit a bit of aluminum for the last few years with a SW180 and 250. Only used dynastys in demos, work very nice. Its all practice seems. Its easy to set up the mahines, the rest is You!....or Me! Somedays I do very good other days
    Scott
    HMW [Heavy Metal welding]

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    near rochester NY
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    9,881

    Lightbulb

    if you e-mail diamond ground they will send you out a free sample of there preground tungsten. so you have nothing to lose by trying some other options. i recommend 2% lanthanated, 1.5% lanthanated , and 2% cerated. as a good choice for samples. all in 3.32 as its going to do the majority of most peoples work.
    try them see what you like. it's only a few minutes of your time invested and could make your life much essayer as well as your welds look better...... ok so it wont make you a better welder, but it will make it essayer for you to be one.

    lanthanated will give you better starts than pure will as well as cary more amps. i prefer 2% (blue) as it stands up to the heat much better than 2% cerated or 1.5% lanthanated .
    with an inverter you never want to ball the tung. grind it to a point then take the tip off for AC work, for DC leave the tip on is the recommended process.

    when doing AC with 2%lanthanated you grind it to a point then add a small flat to the end. this will become convexed on its own. not really a ball but start to round a bit, that's fine. i have had some cases where the tung. did not change at all due to the heat. after running at 160amp's for about 20 minutes the tung. looked just as it did when i started. that was the final straw and i have never goon back to any other tung. 2% lanthanated works excellent on AC & DC so i need not stock more than one type. this makes grinding both ends not a problem as i know all my tung. is 2% lanthanated.

    many transformer users are going to lanthanated with great results.
    better control, longer tung. life, less time spent grinding and changing tung. all this adds up to more $$ in the pocket and better looking work. so for those with transformers give it a try.

    many also use cerated 2% on there inverters, again for AC & DC although its not the best choice for AC as it can have a tendency to split on you . that said many still are very happy with it as an AC tung. and use it for both . i was happy with the results i got with it but preferred the 2% lanthanated. to each his/her own. use what you like the feel of.

    balling the tung. with the dyn200 is not a good idea and can cause damage to the unit. you don't need to do it and its way old school. you spent the $$ to go new school so why would you want to go back to old school ways.
    there are some excellent on-line dealers for tung. as well as some not so great. diamond ground is my first choice. (i'll see if i can dig up my link to there e-bay store) or you can go directly threw the site over the phone or threw e-mail.


    some thing you might try is a Little out of position work. i know you are thinking what the ----!!! i cant even do flat. but i don't expect you to do well at it. i just want you to put your work in the vice standing up and run a bead across it sideways. this is just to let you get a better idea of how the puddle is working. you will be able to see the puddle as it liquefies and tries to run. this is when you add filler to freeze the puddle to keep it in place. you can back off a little on the amps here or tilt back the torch toward the last bead. don't go crazy trying to get great results on this, its just a learning tool i used to get a better understanding of what the puddle was doing. after a little bit of time on the side go back to flat to perfect your style. you should have no trouble knowing you have good penetration after this exercise. or it may just frustrate you even more. i hope not. try to stay positive and don't rush it. TIG takes time and great TIG takes a life time. i'm still fairly new to TIG myself and am just trying to pass on a trick that really helped me. you might also consider a doing project. keep in mind it can be anything and it dose not have to come out great. after all you have a saw and a TIG welder , you can take it apart and do it again if you don't like it. i found siting at the welding desk welding lil tab's together boring and it drove me nuts. so i decided i would make a welder cart for my welder out of aluminum. this was a great idea as it gave me practice welding in all kinds of positions, over under threw, standing sitting even twisting threw. great fun with nothing to lose, after all i can take it apart and start over right. you may not be ready for a cart, but nothing wrong with making some thing small just to keep it from becoming boring or monotonous. its got to be fun for me and it is loads of fun.
    best of luck to ya.

    here are a few words on tung. prep from a member not often seen any more but definitely a great TIG-er. some advice he gave me on tung when i was starting out.
    wow sorry for the book, i attached a few pic's of my cart just for inspiration.and a little fun.


    I would stick to (2) tungsten sizes from what you are telling me. ALWAYS USE 1.5% OR 2% LANTHANATED TUNGSTEN WITH THIS MACHINE. I promise it will save you a multitude of headaches!


    Actually you can get by easily with only 3/32” diameter tungsten. Diamond ground can send you some samples with a 20 degree taper and a .020” flat. This should do everything from 30 amps up to 120 amps and maybe higher. For the 120 amps to max on the Dynasty 200DX the same 3/32” tungsten will work. Use a 35 degree taper and a .030” flat. This thicker taper and wider flat will handle the current better. The 1/16” will only help your arc stability “somewhat” in the 10-25 amp range. I don’t think it will make much difference to you when first learning, but is nice to have a back up.



    Let me tell about current capacity with lanthanated tungsten and the Dynasty inverters. I recently sold my D200DX to a friend and am keeping my 300DX Dynasty. I mainly use 3/32” 2% lanthanated tungsten. I weld aluminum, stainless, and titanium. I occasionally work with mild steel, but not often. Anyway, I use this tungsten for everything from 30 amps to 300 amps. I even run a 75% helium/25%argon mix on aluminum at 300 amps and the tungsten does not melt down. I do use the 35 degree taper and a .030” end flat for everything over 120 amps. I have the Diamond Ground Piranha II tungsten sharpener which makes it easy to adjust taper and end flat in a flash! You can also do it with a bench grinder by hand and eye. I did it for many years that way. A plain jane aluminum oxide wheel works wonders. Do dedicate a wheel to tungsten only. Don’t grind other material on this wheel as the contamination will play havoc on your welds!



    For starters on AC with aluminum use 110HZ, 72 EN balance, no pulse, and approximately 1 amp per .001” of material thickness. For example 1/8” =.125 inches or 125 amps.



    I hope this helps. By the way 3/32” 2% lanthanated does 99% of my work. I use the 1/16” diameter for the thin stuff as in 22 gauge for your work. I have used .010” thoriated for very specialized work such a .0040” hastealloy ribbon. Unless you get into something very special 1/16” and 3/32” will do all you will ever need to do. Let me know if I missed something.

    Attached Images Attached Images
    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped

    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
    summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
    JAMES

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