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Thread: Aluminum Tiging

  1. #1

    Question Aluminum Tiging

    Im teaching myself how to weld aluminum on a dynasty 200 dx.
    Im welding a 1/4 inch tang to a 1/4 inch plate Ihave the machine settings as follows amp 170, hz 170, balance 75. Is it right? my welds are strong but ugly how do I do the scale pattern do I have to make stops and then move or do I have to change the torch from upright to raked and move and put it upright again...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Ukiah, Ca
    Posts
    280

    Default

    It takes a lot of practice. Get your aluminum clean. Do a search on welding Al on this site. I have a transformer machine & use pure tungsten. Do a search on which tungsten to use for an inverter machine, & how to ball it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Grande Prairie, Alberta Canada
    Posts
    729

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    What Polarity?
    What Tungsten?
    What Diameter Tungsten?
    What Alloy of Aluminum?
    What Allow filler metal?
    What Diameter filler metal?
    What type of shielding gas?
    What flow rate of gas?
    What method are you using??? Dip or Constant Feed???

    Now directly from your post:
    What makes you think you have 170hz, North America is 60Hz.
    What makes you think balance of 70 is correct? Do you know what it means?
    What makes you think that the welding procedure you outlined is anywhere close to what is used in proper GTAW welding?

    Lastly:
    What made you think you were anywhere close to being ready to self learn how to GTAW anything, let alone Aluminum.????

    If you cannot answer all of my questions, you need more education.

    Sorry for sounding rude....You really bit off a mouthful with this one. From your questions and comments, you have a slow learning curve and a long road ahead of you.

    Good Luck.

    Later,
    Jason

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    72

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Black Wolf View Post
    What makes you think you have 170hz, North America is 60Hz.
    He's got a Dynasty, AC output frequency is adjustable.
    XMT-300 with S-64 wire feeder.
    Lincoln HI-FREQ modified to run XMT.
    Esab PCM-875 plasma cutter.
    Miller Spoolmatic-1
    Miller PC-300 pulser
    Miller Optima pulser

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Grande Prairie, Alberta Canada
    Posts
    729

    Default

    My bad. Thanks. I use a really old Syncrowave 250 at work.

  6. #6

    Default Tiging aluminum

    Quote Originally Posted by Black Wolf View Post
    What Polarity?
    What Tungsten? 3/32 pure
    What Diameter Tungsten?
    What Alloy of Aluminum? 6061
    What Allow filler metal? the only one they sell around here.
    What Diameter filler metal? 3/32
    What type of shielding gas? pure argon
    What flow rate of gas? 30 cfm
    What method are you using??? Dip or Constant Feed??? tell me about this one

    Now directly from your post:
    What makes you think you have 170hz, North America is 60Hz. My machine you can control output frecuency
    What makes you think balance of 70 is correct? Do you know what it means? yes this is 70 percent penetration 30 % cleaning
    What makes you think that the welding procedure you outlined is anywhere close to what is used in proper GTAW welding? Wll i,ve read and seen all tutorials in this site plus I got a peek of a certified welder welding aluminum. I have welded for about 4 to 5 hours and my welds looks arent bad but I would like to get the scale look.

    Lastly:
    What made you think you were anywhere close to being ready to self learn how to GTAW anything, let alone Aluminum.???? Ive done it already but only need advice on the movement of the torch is it continuous or is it small pauses to do the darn scales thing if you know what I mean. Im a 42 year old tool & die maker. I got to weld aluminum back in 1987 at school and now Im starting again because of a job change.

    If you cannot answer all of my questions, you need more education.

    Sorry for sounding rude....You really bit off a mouthful with this one. From your questions and comments, you have a slow learning curve and a long road ahead of you.

    Good Luck.

    Later,
    Jason
    check this out

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    541

    Default

    Uh, check what out?
    Tim Beeker,
    T-N-J Industries
    (my side bussiness)

    Miller Synchrowave 350LX with tigrunner
    Esab 450i with wire feeder
    HH135 mig
    Thermal Dynamics cutmaster 51 plasma cutter
    Miller aircrafter 330 - sold
    Marathon 315mm coldsaw
    vertical and horizontal band saws
    table saw
    Dewalt cut off saw
    Sand blast cabinet
    lots of hand grinders
    Harris torch
    beer fridge

  8. #8

    Default tiging aluminum

    I answered wolfs questions see if they are alright

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Grande Prairie, Alberta Canada
    Posts
    729

    Default

    It wasn't really a quiz, but now we know where you are starting from, so we can help you out.

    You never specified Polarity, but since you are balancing penetration & cleaning, you must be on AC.

    Pure Tungsten - have you prepared it with a balled end before welding?

    Welding methods:

    Dip method: Establish & maintain molten puddle, and travel speed. Filler metal is added in "timed" intervals, dipping the filler metal into the leading edge of the molten puddle. After deposition, filler metal is removed from the puddle, but still kept in the gas shield pocket to prevent contamination.

    Continuous Feed Method: Kind of self explanitory. Establish & maintain molten puddle. Filler metal is continously fed into leading edge of molten puddle.

    Nozzle inclination is the same with GTAW (Tig) as with GMAW (Mig) in that the nozzle angle should bisect the joint angle. ie a 90 degree fillet weld would have a 45 degree nozzle angle. Nozzle inclination, same thing, inclined slightly in the direction of travel to keep a continous pocket of shielding gas over the molten metal, to prevent contamination while welding AND cooling.

    The weld pattern that you are looking for is operator controlled. Without changing nozzle angle or inclination, if you maintain an equal sized molten puddle with each step you take along the weld, you will achieve the pattern you are looking for. Many of the members here use welding positioners, and also "Walk the Cup" while doing fillet welds. I, myself, do not do this as I do not have a GTAW welder at home to play with, and I use a very old "bare bones" welder at work, with a HUGE & Cumbersome back cap. I know how to do it, but have very little experience with it.

    Hopefully that helps you out a little.
    Best of luck with the job change.

    Later,
    Jason

  10. #10

    Default

    What Polarity?
    What Tungsten? 3/32 pure
    What Diameter Tungsten?
    What Alloy of Aluminum? 6061
    What Allow filler metal? the only one they sell around here.
    What Diameter filler metal? 3/32
    What type of shielding gas? pure argon
    What flow rate of gas? 30 cfm
    My recommendations:
    What Polarity? AC with a balance in the 65-75 range
    What Tungsten? 3/32" ceriated (pure is not the best choice for an inverter)
    What Alloy of Aluminum? 6061
    What Allow filler metal? 4043 (look at the end of the filler rod and it will be stamped there.
    What Diameter filler metal? 3/32
    What type of shielding gas? pure argon
    What flow rate of gas? 20 cfm (30 you are just wasting gas)

    The rest is practice.

    some pictures will help.
    Ron

    ShopFloorTalk

    Millermatic 350P, Roughneck 4012 and Ironmate guns
    Dynasty 300DX, Coolmate 3, Crafter CS-310 Torch
    Trailblazer 302, 12RC, WC-24
    30A spoolgun
    Spectrum 2050

    Thermal Arc Plasma Welder PS-3000/WC-100B

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