Miller Electric

Welding Discussion Forums

Home » Resources » Communities » Welding Discussion Forums
 
Miller Welding Discussion Forums - Powered by vBulletin

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 50
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    East Tennessee
    Posts
    141

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jrscgsr View Post
    WTF am I talking about? WTF are you talking about? I never even mentioned steel. Read it again before trying to jump on someone for what they wrote without even knowing the facts. The pure tung is not ideal for aluminum on an advanced square wave machine, ceriated or lanthiated is a much better choice of tungsten if you have an advanced square wave machine welding aluminum because they carry more heat without balling on the end, and it's recommended to grind it to a modified point because it will provide better arc stability and arc starting. It is written in the "Tig Handbook" downloadable on this site under the tungstens section.
    Nope.... YOU are the one that's wrong on this one.
    you would be correct IF he was using an inverter machine, he's got a sync. 200.
    I DID go to the resources tab, pulled up the owners manual for the Sync 200, & it CLEARLY states not to use pure tungsten for steel or stainless, but green is the recommended tungsten for aluminum.
    those my friend are the facts.
    I really don't give a **** any more, & I won't be pulled into a pissing match.

    Threads like this are why I quit visiting this forum for several months. Looks like I need to leave again.
    The original poster took the time to post one of his projects, gave us pictures, & all anybody did was tell him how wrong he was.
    I'm outta here again.
    I may check back this fall, then again I may not. You'all have fun now, ya hear.....
    Professional Auto Mechanic since 1974
    My own shop since 1981
    Cya Frank

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Lake of the Ozarks MO
    Posts
    3,507

    Default

    No matter what the manual for the machine says... it is outdated if it says to use pure.
    Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
    MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
    Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

    Miller Bobcat 225 NT
    Miller 30-A Spoolgun
    Miller WC-115-A
    Miller Spectrum 300
    Miller Spoolmate 200
    Miller 225 Thunderbolt
    SPEEDGLAS 9100XX

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Deltaville, VA
    Posts
    2,239

    Default

    I said previously that I was taking my keyboard and leaving. I did.

    Since these comments are not directed at the OP I will add a few items.

    While I fully agree with FK that, while not the optimal tungsten to use on a Squarewave machine (Sync 200) the pure is OK. In the owners manual, it cautions against using pure on steel and SS. In fact, it recommends the use of thoriated for steel/SS. With advances in tungsten makeup, like FK says, the lanthanated or ceriated tungstens are a better choice.

    The comment really deals with a couple of the other posters who throw around terms and cite references without understanding what they're talking about. Maybe they should read the "whole book".

    For clarification, the Syncrowave 200, 250, and 350 are NOT ADVANCED SQUAREWAVE MACHINES. While the squarewave technology is considerably more advanced than the older sine wave machines and do include a balance capability they still do not fall into the advanced squarewave technology category.

    Advanced squarewave machines in the Miller lineup include the inverters (Dynasty, Maxstar, etc) machines. These machines have many features not found on a standard squarewave machine. The Dynasty machines make use of multiple waveforms, arc shaping (through the use of higher frequency), do not require constant HF to maintain an arc in AC welding because they make the transition so quickly, increased balance range, higher pulse (PPS) rates and so on.

    Just because you may have bought your Syncrowave 200 a few months ago doesn't make it an Advanced Squarewave Machine. The technology in that machine was developed in 1975.

    Certain posters should learn to get their facts straight before getting in whizzing contests with other posters who also may not fully understand what they're talking about.

    Certain posters seem to like to "blow smoke" to make people think they know what they're talking about, when, in fact, all they demonstrate is a general lack of knowledge. When they throw terms around without understanding what they mean, is a perfect example.
    Syncrowave 250 DX Tigrunner
    Dynasty 200 DX
    Miller XMT 304 w/714D Feeder & Optima Control
    Miller MM 251 w/Q300 & 30A SG
    Hobart HH187
    Dialarc 250 AC/DC
    Hypertherm PM 600 & 1250
    Wilton 7"x12" bandsaw
    PC Dry Cut Saw, Dewalt Chop Saw
    Milwaukee 8" Metal Cut Saw, Milwaukee Portaband.
    Thermco and Smith (2) Gas Mixers
    More grinders than hands

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    southern California
    Posts
    1,783

    Default

    I've found that red (2% thoriated) can be used in any mode on any machine acceptably. It is not the ideal for all situations, but it does work.

    My flame suit is on...
    Millermatic350P/Python, MillermaticReach/Q300
    Millermatic175
    MillermaticPassport/Q300
    HTP MIG200
    PowCon 300SM, MK Cobramatic
    ThermalArc 185ACDC, Dynaflux Tig'r, CK-20
    DialarcHF, Radiator-1
    Hypertherm PowerMax 380
    Purox oxy/ace
    Jackson EQC
    -F350 CrewCab 4x4
    -LoadNGo utility bed
    -Bobcat 250NT
    -PassportPlus/Q300
    -XMT304/Optima/Spoolmatic15A
    -Suitcase8RC/Q400
    -Suitcase12RC/Q300
    -Smith oxy/propane
    -Jackson EQC

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    245

    Default

    on my sync 200


    i use thoriated for steel

    i use lanthanated for most aluminum

    i use pure when i want more of a rounded wider dime stack on thicker aluminum.

    anyway,,, this copy paste may help






    Pure Tungsten (TP) - Green Tip - Readily forms a ball on the end. It is generally used with transformer-based power sources for AC welding of aluminum.

    2% Thoriated Tungsten (TT2) - Red Tip - This tungsten is the most common tungsten currently being used. It is generally utilized for DC welding of steel and stainless steel and offers good overall performance. A drawback is that this tungsten has a low level radiation hazard.



    2% Ceriated Tungsten (TC2) - Grey Tip - 2% ceriated is an excellent substitute for 2% thoriated tungsten if you are using a transformer-based power source for DC welding. This tungsten is popular for thinner materials because it requires less amperage to start. It offers a stable arc and can be used for both AC and DC welding with inverter power sources.

    1 % Lanthanated Tungsten (TL2) - Gold Tip - 1% lanthanated is also a great substitute for 2% thoriated tungsten. It offers good arc starting characteristics and longer life than 2% thoriated. It can be used for both AC and DC welding with both inverter and transformer power sources.
    Anything you could do, I could do better.
    I can do anything better than you!
    Lockheed Martin
    Armco Steel, Baltimore
    USW local #3185

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Deltaville, VA
    Posts
    2,239

    Default

    DR,

    While the thoriated "can" be used for most applications, I've personally found it not to be the "best".

    With both the Syncrowave 250 and the Dynasty 200 DX, I've sorta settled on two tungstens. The thoriated for steel/SS, and the 2% lanthanated for aluminum. That's what I use on both machines.

    The problem I found with AC welding with the thoriated is that as the amps go up, the tungsten tends to "split" and form multiple small "ba11s" on the tip. Once this occurs, it's time to hit the grinder because the arc starts to wander.

    The 2% lanthanated, under higher amps, will tend to form a single smaller, controllable ba11 at the tip. This is more prevelant with the Sync than it is with the Dynasty. All said thought, I find the lanthanated to produce a much more controlled arc than the pure.

    I suspect the whole issue (pure vs lanthanated/ceriated) dates back to when the manuals were written for the Syncrowave machines (about 1975). At that time thoriated and pure were the most common tungstens available. Consequently, they recommended thoriated for steel and pure for aluminum.

    Interesting to note that Miller specifically recommends NOT using pure tungsten in their inverter machines.

    While I've still got a considerable "stockpile" of pure tungsten left over from the "old days", I can't remember when I last stuck one in a tig torch. I have found a variety of uses for them though (scribes, chopsticks, axles for wooden toys, etc, etc). If anyone else has some suggestions I'd be glad to hear them.

    Off the soapbox. Didn't really mean to jump back on but when I see "experts" expounding BS without having a clue what they're talking about, I do tend to get my feathers ruffled. It should be clear to anyone reading this thread who I'm talking about.
    Syncrowave 250 DX Tigrunner
    Dynasty 200 DX
    Miller XMT 304 w/714D Feeder & Optima Control
    Miller MM 251 w/Q300 & 30A SG
    Hobart HH187
    Dialarc 250 AC/DC
    Hypertherm PM 600 & 1250
    Wilton 7"x12" bandsaw
    PC Dry Cut Saw, Dewalt Chop Saw
    Milwaukee 8" Metal Cut Saw, Milwaukee Portaband.
    Thermco and Smith (2) Gas Mixers
    More grinders than hands

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Houston, Tx.
    Posts
    378

    Default

    Glad you jumped back on. I've still got a few pure tungstens from when i had a sync. Now That i have an inverter I'm in the same boat. I never thought about using them as scribes. I'd bet they would fit in an architect's lead holder and could be used like a pencil and clipped in a pocket when not in use.
    Sometimes there's no second chances.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    southern California
    Posts
    1,783

    Default

    Sundown, I agree the red I use is far from the best for everything, especially AC. I've found the same thing about the thoriated splitting and spitting under higher amps on AC.
    Millermatic350P/Python, MillermaticReach/Q300
    Millermatic175
    MillermaticPassport/Q300
    HTP MIG200
    PowCon 300SM, MK Cobramatic
    ThermalArc 185ACDC, Dynaflux Tig'r, CK-20
    DialarcHF, Radiator-1
    Hypertherm PowerMax 380
    Purox oxy/ace
    Jackson EQC
    -F350 CrewCab 4x4
    -LoadNGo utility bed
    -Bobcat 250NT
    -PassportPlus/Q300
    -XMT304/Optima/Spoolmatic15A
    -Suitcase8RC/Q400
    -Suitcase12RC/Q300
    -Smith oxy/propane
    -Jackson EQC

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Lake of the Ozarks MO
    Posts
    3,507

    Default

    Just a quick note as I am very busy lately.
    The people who like what pure produces on a syncrowave, would be very happy with BROWN IMO. (on AC)
    Sorry I hated to throw another color in there
    As for People who like to use pure on a Dynasty I wish they would say what mode the machine was in. If they know how to tell.
    I feel pure is totally useless and am 100% with Sundown on this.
    If you use pure tungsten on an ADVANCED square wave machine (and in that mode) then you are probably running bias ply tires on your car as well.
    Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
    MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
    Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

    Miller Bobcat 225 NT
    Miller 30-A Spoolgun
    Miller WC-115-A
    Miller Spectrum 300
    Miller Spoolmate 200
    Miller 225 Thunderbolt
    SPEEDGLAS 9100XX

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    arkansas
    Posts
    781

    Default

    LMAO @ bias ply tires..... wow..... anyway, i have a synchro and i use pure tungsten. i like the way it welds. i have not tried the brown bands, i will give them a try, but not making any promises.... (most of my tig work is on aluminum)
    welder_one

    nothing fancy, just a few hot glue guns for metal
    www.sicfabrications.com

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Function split() is deprecated in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/footer.inc.php on line 62

Welding Projects

Special Offers: See the latest Miller deals and promotions.

Warning: Function split() is deprecated in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/footer.inc.php on line 137