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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    20

    Default

    This is a super old thread that I am bringing back to life.

    I finished the project I was working on last fall and it turned out beautifully.

    (It was a large hay feeder that holds several bales for cattle)

    It weighs a LOT! but bygolly those old cows sure don't bend or break it like they do with cheap store bought feeders.

    I've got another project to work on this weekend.

    It's a mobile creep feeder that will be made out of the same matterial, I think I have enough 2 3/8" and 2 7/8" drill stem left as well as a quantity of sucker rod.

    It's going to be about 8' X 10' and mounted on a mobile home axle so that it can be moved from one field to the next.

    I'm still interested in hearing about techniques for good fit up of the joints.

    Somebody asked what rod I'm using, the last project I used AWS 7018 1/8" that says it's for DCEP or AC current.

    On the last project I used a 12 ton hydraulic press to crimp the pipe ends where they were welded together. I can still use this method but I found that it is very easy to crack the pipe when crimping and 12 ton is barely enough to get a very good crimp at all. SO there is a lot of time wasted filling and messing around when welding the joints.

    I'm interested in the chop saw method others have mentioned in previous posts, I'd try the holesaw idea but it sounds like that would be pain staking and I can't imagine the holesaw making many cuts before it was junk. Drill stem is VERY hard matterial from my experince and about 1/4" thick matterial.

    If I understand right, you are talking about notching the end of the pipe with a chop saw about 45 degrees an inch wide?

    Wouldn't that mean that the cuts will not be the same depth because the wheel will not be in contact with as much of the pipe on the bottom side as the top? Or do you make 4 cuts to make the notches through the pipe the same depth and continuously turning the pipe over?

    If somebody could explain more that would be great.

    Thanks.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    2,860

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tool View Post

    If I understand right, you are talking about notching the end of the pipe with a chop saw about 45 degrees an inch wide?
    Thanks.
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  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Awesome,

    that's a big help thanks.

    I don't know why I couldn' vicualise it in my head but I was seeing something enitrely different.

    I just might try that on this project, looks like it would make better fit up then the hydraulic press squashing technique.

    Maybe I can make a bit of a jig so it wll go quickly.

    I'll try it on some scrap tonight.

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    144

    Default

    a timely bump to this old post.

    i'll be starting a 1000' of drill stem 2.375" pipe in a week or so. My vertical posts will be concreted in 10' apart and will cut them an extra 4-6" to tall.

    Next I'll build a 58" tall saddle cut jig that will slip over these vertical posts and i'll hit them with the plasma cutter.

    I might have to mount a laser pointer in this jig so im sure to saddle cut all these cuts in the same direction.

    joel

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Does anybody happen o know the angles off hand for 2 3/8" and/or 2 7/8" pipe?

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    19

    Default

    This is a great thread- lots of good links and feedback. Congratulations on a successful project.

    When I work with pipe, it's schedule 40.

    I use an "Old Joint Jigger" pipe notcher, just about exclusively to cut a through-hole in pipe where I'll insert a smaller diameter pipe. I bought an extra shaft and had it pointed- I insert this into the fixture to index the notch or hole from center punch marks I lay out on the pipe. I do some notching with the fixture, also.

    For tee joints, etc., I've found that two small dishes opposed at 180 degrees on the pipe edge, made with a torch or grinder, will suffice.

    Getting the overall dimension of the tee joint, the height, is what we're after.

    On smaller diameter pipe, you can get away with not notching at all, and filling the gap with metal.

    MIG works best for this, probably 7018 next best. I usually weld pipe with 6010 or 6011.

    I saw 6013 mentioned- does anyone have any real use for this rod? I've never seen any use for it, but I'm willing to listen

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Cave Creek Az
    Posts
    988

    Default

    Congrats on finishing. I'd like to see some pictures. Also, there actually isn't a 2 3/8" pipe. Pipe is measured by the I.D. and so 2" pipe is 2 3/8" O.D. Its a small thing, but for some reason it bothers me.(BTW tubing is measured O.D.)
    As far as smashingthe pipe to weld it I have found that my little 20 ton press works well. I also don't smash it completely, but leave 1/2" to 3/4" space in between the walls. I don't get near as much splitting that way. Also, make sure the seam doesn't fall on the top or bottom (the narrow ends) of the smash. Put it in the middle of the flat section an dit is less likely to crack.

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Drill stem in these parts is generally reffered to in a couple of different sizes.

    2 3/8" and 2 7/8"

    You are correct those are outside diameters.

    All I know is if you walked into any steel yard and asked for some 2" drill pipe they would look at you like you are crazy.

    Maybe it's a regional thing but that is the way it is reffered to here atleast.

    I only had a 12 ton press to use for the crimping on the last project but even still with drill pipe you cant squash it more than maybe 3/4 of an inch between the walls without it splitting, it is about 1/4" wall material and quite hard. Much harder than regular water pipe etc.

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    109

    Default Saddles

    I use propane to torch cut I get a smaller kerf also try angling the tip a little away from the good piece this will leave the slag on the dropand you dont have to grind as much also WELDING SUPPLY STORES HAVE SADDLE jigs come in handy

  10. #50
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    11

    Default

    [QUOTE=tool;192718]Drill stem in these parts is generally reffered to in a couple of different sizes.

    2 3/8" and 2 7/8"

    You are correct those are outside diameters.

    All I know is if you walked into any steel yard and asked for some 2" drill pipe they would look at you like you are crazy.

    Maybe it's a regional thing but that is the way it is reffered to here atleast.

    I only had a 12 ton press to use for the crimping on the last project but even still with drill pipe you cant squash it more than maybe 3/4 of an inch between the walls without it splitting, it is about 1/4" wall material and quite hard. Much harder than regular water pipe etc.[/QUOTE

    Funny how the name of things change in different regions. Around here drill pipe (or stem) is usually referred to as 4 1/2" or 5" that we actually drill with. We have alot of 2 3/8" and 2 7/8" tubing we use to get the oil & gas to the surface. When times were slow a good many years back (as they also are now) we took old 2 3/8" upset tubing and built alot of fence at the owner/bosses ranch. You look at those fences today and wonder how somebody could afford to build one at todays prices.

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