Miller Electric

Welding Discussion Forums

Home » Resources » Communities » Welding Discussion Forums
 
Miller Welding Discussion Forums - Powered by vBulletin

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 30
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    838

    Default

    Evacuate it with a high vacuum pump running outdoors with a blower blowing the propane away from the pump's motor. When you reach a really good vacuum, say, 500 microns as indicated by a thermistor gauge, break the vacuum. All residual propane has been boiled to a gas state (provided the container no longer has any cold spots) and will no longer leech out of the metal. The concentration of propane is now 0.07% (30 times leaner than the lower flammability limit) and the mixture is completely non-flammable.

    The key is that propane is only explosive at concentrations between 2% and 10%. Below 2% you can blow it right into a flame and it won't burn. Above about 10% concentration in air, it will not burn either... but it will further dilute in air and become an explosive mixture.

    80% of failures are from 20% of causes
    Never compromise your principles today in the name of furthering them in the future.
    "All I ever wanted was an honest week's pay for an honest day's work." -Sgt. Bilko
    "We are generally better persuaded by reasons we discover ourselves than by those given to us by others." -Pascal
    "Since we cannot know all that there is to be known about anything, we ought to know a little about everything." -Pascal

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Victoria,BC
    Posts
    15

    Arrow cutting a propane tank

    I can only speak from my personal, first hand experience, so take it or leave it.
    I have cut dozens of propane tanks. 20-100lbs tanks. I got my method from professional in the propane tank industry.
    As follows:
    empty tank outdoors
    remove valve outdoors ( make your own wrench)
    fill tank with water, empty
    fill again and let sit over night (12-24 hours)
    empty
    cut away with plasma or zip cut or torch.
    The water displaces the LP gas and ensures its completely forced out. As well it rinses out some of the residue left from the chemical odorent that is added.
    I've not experienced any sort of "poof".
    Do only what you're are comfortable doing. I don't advocate taking forum advise as gospel. I can only relay my first hand experience.
    Urban legend can muddy the waters of truth.
    Since this topic comes up quite often on many forums I may try to light an un-prep'd tank remotely. I've got a good size property. I'll bury the tank up to the top and sand bag it. Will video tape to record the result.
    Good luck
    Bert

  3. #13

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by bert the welder View Post
    Since this topic comes up quite often on many forums I may try to light an un-prep'd tank remotely. I've got a good size property. I'll bury the tank up to the top and sand bag it. Will video tape to record the result.
    Good luck
    Bert
    That would be a real "shock and awe" type of video.

    I would suggest letting the local sheriff know in advance about when you remotely light that thing up. He will be having to deal with calls reporting what sounded like a bomb explosion or plane crash or etc and etc.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Spruce Grove, Alberta,Canada
    Posts
    583

    Default

    Like telling kids to run with scissors! Phone around see how many welder's will do this. I had a friend who got real lucky when he was an apprentice cutting a gas tank because farmer Bill has done hundreds of them. Common sense people !! Use it ! What is so **** important about cutting a propane bottle in half anyway?? If you want and have to cut one in half safely drive yourself down to Wal-Mart and go to the garden section and buy a brand new one that has never had propane in it! Some of them old bottle's had liner's in them and it wouldn't matter how much you washed them out "THE POTENTIAL FOR EXPLOSION " is still there! Jef

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    WY...armpit of U.S.A.
    Posts
    659

    Default

    Jef,
    You're right of course. I won't argue with you over your advice/warning in the least...You are absolutely correct.

    When I was the first one to reply I was giving a lesson I learned from my dad/Farmer John when I was a kid. Neighbor brought over a hot water tank to cut open with our O/A torch to use as a slop trough for his pigs. The only way my dad would let it happen was to have the tank filled with water beginning to end. Dad wasn't worried about propane or oil just unspent gas from the cutting torch flame accumulating in the tank during the cut. So I guess even a brand new tank from Wal-Mart just might be a problem.

    These days with the Internet everyone is a potential expert and everyone wants a quick answer. Reasoned replies in the past to posters queries have been dismissed like water off a duck's back by the person posting because they weren't the 'right' answers, weren't easy, cost too much, etc. A simple "Don't!!!" won't stop the potential Darwin Award winner either. So what do you do?
    Miller 251...sold the spoolgun to DiverBill.
    Miller DialArc 250
    Lincoln PrecisionTig 275
    Hypertherm 900 plasma cutter
    Bridgeport "J" head mill...tooled up
    Jet 14 X 40 lathe...ditto
    South Bend 9" lathe...yeah, got the change gears too
    Logan 7" shaper
    Ellis 3000 band saw
    Hossfeld bender w/shopbuilt hyd.
    Victor Journeyman torch and gauges
    3 Gerstner boxes of mostly Starrett tools
    Lots of dust bunnies
    Too small of a shop at 40 X 59.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Spruce Grove, Alberta,Canada
    Posts
    583

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WyoRoy View Post
    Jef,
    You're right of course. I won't argue with you over your advice/warning in the least...You are absolutely correct.

    When I was the first one to reply I was giving a lesson I learned from my dad/Farmer John when I was a kid. Neighbor brought over a hot water tank to cut open with our O/A torch to use as a slop trough for his pigs. The only way my dad would let it happen was to have the tank filled with water beginning to end. Dad wasn't worried about propane or oil just unspent gas from the cutting torch flame accumulating in the tank during the cut. So I guess even a brand new tank from Wal-Mart just might be a problem.

    These days with the Internet everyone is a potential expert and everyone wants a quick answer. Reasoned replies in the past to posters queries have been dismissed like water off a duck's back by the person posting because they weren't the 'right' answers, weren't easy, cost too much, etc. A simple "Don't!!!" won't stop the potential Darwin Award winner either. So what do you do?
    I'm not blameing you at all and respect that you had the seeds to answer . But I weld for a living and I have done a lot of stuff that would make the average guy's toe's curl! So I'm just saying that if you don't know or have never done it sometimes your pride has to be put in your back pocket. Just because someone has done it and retained their life doesn't make them an expert. Most of the time people want to do stuff like this to make a planter or something like that. Go buy it it's safer. A hot water tank I would be more concerned with the fumes comming out of the tank from cutting it. Most of them are plastic lined or some kind of epoxy. I guess what I'm trying to say is be careful when you do things and make sure you have all your bases covered safety wise before you start and have a plan if something goes sideways. Jef

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    WY...armpit of U.S.A.
    Posts
    659

    Default

    Again, you're right.

    BTW, this was before plastic and epoxy came to be used in water tanks. Nice rivited construction on the ends. Back then, my dad was far more worried about the unburned acetylene from the cutting flame accumulating in the old water tank. Probably the same as he would in a brand new Wal-Mart propane tank purchased in the garden aisle, as per your reference.
    Miller 251...sold the spoolgun to DiverBill.
    Miller DialArc 250
    Lincoln PrecisionTig 275
    Hypertherm 900 plasma cutter
    Bridgeport "J" head mill...tooled up
    Jet 14 X 40 lathe...ditto
    South Bend 9" lathe...yeah, got the change gears too
    Logan 7" shaper
    Ellis 3000 band saw
    Hossfeld bender w/shopbuilt hyd.
    Victor Journeyman torch and gauges
    3 Gerstner boxes of mostly Starrett tools
    Lots of dust bunnies
    Too small of a shop at 40 X 59.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Spruce Grove, Alberta,Canada
    Posts
    583

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WyoRoy View Post
    Again, you're right.

    BTW, this was before plastic and epoxy came to be used in water tanks. Nice rivited construction on the ends. Back then, my dad was far more worried about the unburned acetylene from the cutting flame accumulating in the old water tank. Probably the same as he would in a brand new Wal-Mart propane tank purchased in the garden aisle, as per your reference.
    I hear ya just making a point. You could use a zip disc if you were afraid of unburnt gasses. I noticed you have a 14x40 jet lathe. How big a piece of soilid bar can you turn on it?

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Victoria,BC
    Posts
    15

    Default

    I think after 30+ tanks, Murphy would have already struck. I'm just giving my personal experience. Not assumptions base on theory and urban legend.
    Cut away, I say.

  10. #20

    Default

    I seen a guy weld a gas tank with a mig welder. he added co2 but it still caught flame http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tD4KiQEnxwQ
    and heres ai video of someone cutting a propane tank with a plasma cutter and it caught flame too.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l43u8ItnjUw

    if you choose the water method, airtools will prevent shock.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Function split() is deprecated in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/footer.inc.php on line 82

Welding Projects

Special Offers: See the latest Miller deals and promotions.