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  1. #1

    Default Ironworker Project Complete

    Now, here is a project. I admit it doesn't have a lot to do with welding, more like revitalization of an abused tool for use in welding. Look very closely to see how this guy was using it. It had no switches, you just plugged it in. All guards were removed, but we have all done that from time to time.

    This poor thing was really abused by a guy who built trailers for a living. His shop looked about the same. Fortunately for us all he went into real estate after that.

    Pix of before and after (I even got decals for it). Lots of hours went into it. I even painted it with their two part paint and was I surprised to find it was a wrinkle finish. It came out fine, but it was the first wrinkle finish I have ever done. I had bed liner sprayed on the lower part where it really gets beat up from metal dropping.






  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Oahu, Hawaii
    Posts
    2,469

    Default

    What a beautiful job! How did you get all those scrathes off before paint?
    Flapdisks??
    I'm not late...
    I'm just on Hawaiian Time

  3. #3

    Default

    I ground them off. I got a good sanding primer and a few places I used "green stuff" body filler. I probably got a little **** about this project.

    Jim

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Oahu, Hawaii
    Posts
    2,469

    Default

    Just curious what you ground them off with.........
    again, AWSOME job!!!!!
    I'm not late...
    I'm just on Hawaiian Time

  5. #5

    Default

    Most of them just 7" and 4" angle grinders with grinding disks and then sanding disks with rubber back plates. I did use an orbital sander quite a bit later.

    The bottom metal shrouds were in pretty bad shape since they get hit by metal. I heated some of the spots with a torch and pounded them out. The black truck bed coating covered a multiple of sins and really quieted the thing down.

    One of the hardest things was getting the greasy residue off it. Nothing seemed to cut it very well. It would really plug up sanding disks. I can imagine the former owner's lungs must have looked the same. Had I to do it over again I would have stripped it to the frame and had it sand blasted.

    The two part paint provided by Scotchman was great. I also got a two part primer from an industrial paint supply. Basically it was down to metal pretty much everywhere before I started the priming.

    Scotchman was a great help with their diagrams and their consultation. When you get a machine like this that has been Jerry rigged like it had been you need help. Their online things are great. Some things had changed, however, like the electrical switch which I had to modify a bit.
    Jim

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Oahu, Hawaii
    Posts
    2,469

    Default

    Thanks Jim! Kudos to all the hard work you put into it!! Apparently it paid off! I heard it cost about $200 or so to sharpen a set of blades for that thing. That true with you??
    I'm not late...
    I'm just on Hawaiian Time

  7. #7

    Default

    That sounds about right. I had an old friend who has a great business in custom machining and grinding. He also was a tool and die man. You can eat off the floor in his shop.

    He charged me $300 to sharpen 3 sets of blades plus four sets of the angle shear blades. I thought it was a lot at the time but I think he was more than fair.

    I take it you have one of these. I was wondering how critical the clearances were on the shear. I believe I saw one seventh of the thickness of the metal.

    Jim

  8. #8

    Default

    Also, I would appreciate it if you could tell me what you use it most for. I have thought about picking up a few attachments.

    Jim

    I grew up with a father who was a well driller in Colorado and I know what it is like to be colder than a well driller's butt.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Lodi, CA
    Posts
    1,221

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by modela View Post
    I was wondering how critical the clearances were on the shear. I believe I saw one seventh of the thickness of the metal.

    Jim
    I have no idea on your ironworker, on real shears you generally adjust the clearance to the size of the metal. That being said, you can usually get away with setting a shear, and going up or down a few sizes either way, without readusting each time. You run into problems, though, if you are set for say 1/2" metal, and try to shear 16 gauge. Also vice-versa.
    Obviously, I'm just a hack-artist, you shouldn't be listening to anything I say .....

  10. #10

    Default

    I took a TIG class at a local community college and they had this huge ironworker that automatically adjusted clearances. That was nice, I must admit.

    They also had a huge shear that was semi-automated. That was even nicer.

    For a small machine, this one is not too bad.

    I think back when I had almost no tools. The first project I made after moving to Oregon was a wine press that I made with an old Airco buzz box, a radial arm saw, a saber saw, a hack saw, and a router.

    I finished it with a black epoxy. It came out really nice. My daughter put it in a local fair some years later and it won second prize. Maybe I will post it sometime.

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