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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Southern California
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    21

    Default

    Ok Thanks for the info!

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Williams Lake, British Columbia
    Posts
    722

    Default

    Sonora, That's some good advice right there. 100 % dig on both root and hot pass.

    I'm doing my " British Columbia " B " class welder at the moment. It's a 16 weeks cours fulltime, while still working at the shop I've been working for the last 7 years.

    I'm working on pipes in the 1G, 2G, 5G, 6G uphand and downhand all with E6010 roots and hotpass and cap, and some with E7018 cap. Then tig.

    I was putting my dig at about 50 % and was finding having a hard time striking the arc. I'm going to try that at 100% dig tomorrow,

    Do I have to reduce amperage when 100% dig, it's at about 72 amp with 1/8 rod, then at a little under 100 amp for the hot pass, on 4 " sch-40

    I use a small U pattern going uphand, I go down one side then I go across " left" the bottom up the other side, then I come down the same side then across " right this time " then up back to where I started,

    Thanks

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    1,508

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel View Post
    Do I have to reduce amperage when 100% dig, it's at about 72 amp with 1/8 rod, then at a little under 100 amp for the hot pass, on 4 " sch-40
    I don’t.

    I personally don’t think the Dig has anything to do with temp / amps. It’s hard for me to explain! (You’ll have to see it to understand).
    The Dig controls the flow of the puddle, higher % = stiffer / non-flowing puddle. Lower the % = wetter / flowing puddle. I run my roots with 100 % Dig. Hot and cap around 95 % Dig, (that is when I remember to change it).


    Daniel you run a little hotter than I do, most likely because I’m old and slow, and my reaction time is considerable slower than it use to be!
    Caution!
    These are "my" views based only on “my” experiences in “my” little bitty world.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Williams Lake, British Columbia
    Posts
    722

    Default

    I'm using the CST 280. It has two settings. One for xx10 soft or stiff, and one for xx18 soft and stiff. I put them both on stiff and it's still a little hard to spark and arc sometimes.
    I'm going to try a different machine and do some test.
    I just love welding

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    2,949

    Default 3f-6010

    Quote Originally Posted by Ryno! View Post
    Well it's my second day in lab with the E6010 vertical up, and i've tried afew different ways of whipping the electrode but i'm having issues with undercut on my tee-joint. It seems if I wait to let the puddle fill up the weld starts to sag down and when I go fast enough to get it flat it dosen't cover enough. I'm using a straight whip with the electrode pointed up at a slight angle. Hope that wasen't confusing lol
    1/8" 6010's (probably 5P's or 5P+) run good between 90-100 amps, vertical up on 3/16" and thicker material.

    Your first pass will generally tend to be "humped" in the middle, especially when "whipping," due to the nature of the rod. On your second, and subsequent passes try a "box weave" and finish with a "straight weave" on the final pass.

    If you still experience excessive undercut, reduce current, travel speed, or possibly electrode size, (in some cases), until the puddle is manageable. Also, change the electrode angle so the arc force holds the metal in the corners, using a uniform speed, and avoid excessive weaving.

    DIG settings enhance the arc, and prevent it from "snubbing out" and is especially useful when doing open root pipe.

    Remember, "stick" machines are Constant Current. As you move the rod closer to the work, the voltage drops, and moving it further away, increases the voltage. Voltage is electrical pressure, and does not move.

    The DialArc is an excellent "droop curve" transformer machine. You will notice a difference when you run your Dynasty, as inverter machine arc characteristics and volt/amp curves are "flatter."

    It's good to run the various machines, so you know what to expect. If you get the chance to practice with a good engine drive, you'll also notice a difference there as well.

    My Maxstar 150, Sync 200 and Trailblazer, all have different "personalities."

    Good luck with your endeavors, and keep us posted of your progress. Always good to see those who are eager and enthusiastic to learn the "trade."
    Last edited by davedarragh; 03-22-2010 at 10:35 AM.
    "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    2,890

    Default

    Dig - Also called Arc Control. Gives a power source variable additional amperage during low voltage (short arc length) conditions while welding. Helps avoid “sticking” Stick electrodes when a short arc length is used.

    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...-skills/stick/
    Ed Conley
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  7. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    21

    Default

    Thanks everyone for the help! I didin't get marked off on my tee joint today so that was frustruating but I did try out the J and U patterns and my stringer beads looked really flat and alot better than before with the J, but I coulden't make it work for a tee. Dave thanks for the input! I checked on the brand of rod and it's Hyuandai? 1/8 E6010 and I always find myself running over 90 but not over 100 amps on the dialarc 250 so that's good I got that right. I always run a stringer or two and set my amps when I first start up. I believe I was welding 1/4" plate today. The problem was I started having moderate sucess at the bottom of the joint and about halfway up my arc would burn atlittle uneven and the puddle would move and that messed up my rythim. I tried moving my ground around but it kept doing it. So I think wensday i'm going to switch booths and try a different machine. I know i'll get it with practice, I just need to find a weave that's comfortable and works for me. I'm going to try the u some more and the T on wensday and see how it goes. That's what happened with my Horizontial, I was have a horrible time with trying the whip and getting undercut and not filling enough. Then I tried the circles and Walla! I knocked out my tee joint, lap, and corner in one day and got ahead of everyone else lol

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Cambridge, MA
    Posts
    213

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ryno!;230156 [B
    The problem was I started having moderate sucess at the bottom of the joint and about halfway up my arc would burn atlittle uneven and the puddle would move and that messed up my rythim.[/B]
    almost sounds like your rod angle got a little messed up or your arc length. or both
    American By Birth, Union by Choice!

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  9. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    2,949

    Lightbulb

    If you have access to a Bernard Short-Stub or a Tweco-Tite stinger, the head angle is designed for the optimum rod angle when doing vertical ups.

    It will help with your learning curve.

    They are very easy to use with your thumb and index finger on the head for rod manipulation.
    Last edited by davedarragh; 03-23-2010 at 05:44 PM.
    "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Cambridge, MA
    Posts
    213

    Default

    Dave are you talking about the twist lock style stingers vs the aligator clamp?
    American By Birth, Union by Choice!

    4th generation Pipefitters LU 537

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