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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    302

    Default No torch? No Plasma? No problem

    One of the things you notice when you visit the forums here is some of us have tons of tools. The lucky amongst us have the tools, skills, and experience needed to make anything we want. For a lot of us so lucky now, it wasn't always that way.

    A lot of the visitors here don't have the tools or experience and really want to get the skills and experience because they have the same fire in their gut that we have, their want to is really a need to make things.

    Awhile back a friend came to me to make him another one of the concrete buckets I make for skid steers and other tractors with quick attach plates. His had grown legs and he needed another.

    I decided I would document the build to demonstrate that one doesn't necessarily need all the trick stuff to make trick stuff. On this build I used my circular saw with a steel cutting blade and my mig machine. One of the reasons for choosing this build to go minimum was a lot of us think making cuts in plate requires either a plasma or an oxy/acetylene torch.

    My circular saw is a DeWalt framing saw. What I love about this particular saw is it's a lot more comfortable to use for me than a framing saw from the other brands. A framing saw has a different gear drive than a regular circular saw. They have a ton of torque. When a regular circular saw starts to bog down the framing saw will grab another gear and keep on keeping on.

    I like the Freud Steel Demon blade available at Home Depot. I've found some of the brands available at the steel supply houses don't have the diamond knock out in the blade required for a framing saw. The Steel Demon has a wider kerf than some of the others and it's easier to find sometimes when you need a blade right now. The other brands give you more options, blades for cutting thicker and thinner stuff for instance. The Steel Demon doesn't do as well on thin stuff as a blade from Original or Morse that's made just for cutting thin stuff. It also doesn't do as well cutting thick stuff like one of their special blades made for cutting thick stuff. But for cutting pipe, angle, plate, tubing, it gives value.

    I also decided I would use just one 4' X 8' sheet of three sixteenths plate. Again, just like the guy with a minimum of money and equipment would do. So the first thing I had to do was lay it out leaving as little waste as possible. Then I had to cut it out and tack it up.
    skid steer bucket 2 003.jpgskid steer bucket 2 004.jpgskid steer bucket 2 002.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    302

    Default

    One of the great things with the steel blade in the circular saw is you can do plunge cuts.skid steer bucket 2 011.jpgskid steer bucket 2 010.jpg

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    302

    Default

    The make circular saws for cutting steel with these blades. I don't have one.

    One of the problems with not using one of those specialty saws is the chips from these blades are that perfect combination of mean and nasty that usually can only be found in in-laws and bosses. They are hot like torch sparks. They are also sharp edged which means you keep the kids and pets away from your work area. You also make sure you don't have any of the chips in you shoes or on your clothes when you got into the house. You will hurt something, chances are your rapport with your life will be on that list.

    You also need your safety glasses, gloves, long sleeved shirt, etc. Otherwise you'll be dancing around like a girl and no one likes to see a man dancing like a girl, well, most people don't.

    The blades don't last forever. So if you're doing production it's an expensive method of cutting steel. Where I find I the most appropriate is when I'm working portable. There's less of a fire hazard, you can make cuts that don't need grinding or finishing, and you can use one saw to cut just about anything.whitts building february 2009 151 (Medium).jpgDSC03990.jpg

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    302

    Default

    skid steer bucket 2 014.jpgskid steer bucket 2 013.jpgskid steer bucket 2 012.jpgThis bucket not only demonstrates what can be done with a minimum of tools, circular saw, welder, and grinders, it also shows how to think things out when making them.

    This bucket can hold a ton, 2000 lbs, of wet concrete. The weight needs to be as close to the tractor or tool carrier as possible. Only riding on a sliding ladder can be compared to the pucker power of fear when a tractor starts to do a nose over. The bucket is taller at the back. The bottom angles up from the rear to encourage the load to stay close to the tractor. This design also makes a door on the front unnecessary. The sides and bottom are angled towards the chute to minimize the restriction of concrete when dispensing.
    Last edited by wroughtnharv; 09-10-2010 at 10:11 AM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    302

    Default

    The anti-splash pieces up around the top are very important. These buckets are used to haul concrete across parking lots, factory floors, lawns, and other places where a concrete truck doesn't have access. They're also used when pumping is either too expensive, small jobs in difficult places, or not available, when the work location is too far to bring in a pump. It also replaces the concrete buggy when hauling the concrete is only a small portion of the work being done. Without the anti-splash the concrete can be everywhere between the truck and the destination and it will be, believe me.

    It's easy to be intimidated by the quick attach pieces. They're really very simple to install and you have a lot of clearances to play with. Keep in mind that the concept of them being all interchangeable is true and not true. Sometimes there will be enough of a difference that what will work on one brand won't work on another. If you are making an attachment for a machine bear in mind that it will for sure only work on that machine and might have to be modified a little bit to work on another. The modification will be small but the differences are out there.

    This one worked great on my JCB and the New Holland TC 40. But when my bud tried to put it on his Cat 226 he had to modify it with a grinder a little bit.skid steer bucket 2 026.jpgskid steer bucket 2 018.jpgskid steer bucket 2 023.jpgskid steer bucket 2 022.jpgskid steer bucket 2 021.jpg

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    178

    Default No torch, etc.

    I really like the concept of your project. Actually taking the time to show how a relatively big job can be done with a minimum of equipment. I salute you.
    Professional firefighter (retired). Amateur everything else I try to do...
    Oh yeah: GO BIG RED!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    234

    Default

    I've used the same method. I have an inexpensive Harbor Freight saw and a $20 Freud Diablo blade. I shot some video the first time I used it:

    Cheap Way to Cut

    Chop saws suck by comparison.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Houston, Tx.
    Posts
    378

    Default

    The end result is all that counts. Nice job Harv. I have a pretty complete arsenal of tools, but I still go the simpler way at times. On thin aluminum jobs I use a Bosch jigsaw with non ferrous blades and stick lube. Works better for me than anything else I've got.
    Sometimes there's no second chances.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    15

    Default Concrete Bucket

    Harv,
    Your original concrete bucket bucket post, was some time ago, and and I have revisited this post several times. Your saw work was nice but the bucket has my attention. I thought about making one myself sometime. I was wondering if you had any drawings, to help in getting the best use out of the sheet, like you have done. Once again, nice job, and thanks for sharing your project.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    302

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by north1 View Post
    Harv,
    Your original concrete bucket bucket post, was some time ago, and and I have revisited this post several times. Your saw work was nice but the bucket has my attention. I thought about making one myself sometime. I was wondering if you had any drawings, to help in getting the best use out of the sheet, like you have done. Once again, nice job, and thanks for sharing your project.
    Just the other day my version of that bucket was "borrowed" by a friend needing to pour some concrete where they couldn't get in a truck.

    That evening he called me to thank me for making a full day job only last a half day. He also let me know he had my bucket and would store it for me until I needed it.

    I can't get the measurements at this point in time. As soon as I get the bucket back I'll pulll measurements for a reply to this post.

    In the meantime if you need to make the bucket you can lay it out with some soapstone to where it fits on a sheet. Once you start laying it out you will find so many common measurements and angles. By the time you're done you'll appreciate the simplicity of it, really. It's another one of those projects where I got lucky. And we all know it's better to be lucky than good. Anyone can be good, that only takes effort.

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