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Thread: 6010,6011,6013

  1. #1

    Default 6010,6011,6013

    Hey guys, I need to pick your brain. I was just wondering what the difference is between these 3 types of rods, i have used all three and am practicing to become a pipe welder so the 6010 is a no brainer. Back to the question at hand tho i was just the difference in how they burn what makes them act that way and things of that nature. Thanks

  2. #2
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    Default

    Go to Lincolnelectric.com and read all about these rods. Good info.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    Default

    Differences are in the flux, 6011 is like 6010 but has an arc stabilizer added to the flux for welding with AC, 6012 is another all purpose rod, I cant remeber what additives are in the flux, I will look that one up. But they are all deep penetration, all position, fast freeze rods.
    Last edited by Inkomodius; 11-25-2009 at 05:59 PM. Reason: Spelling was bad

  4. #4
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    Default Electrode Differences

    Quote Originally Posted by fng656 View Post
    Hey guys, I need to pick your brain. I was just wondering what the difference is between these 3 types of rods, i have used all three and am practicing to become a pipe welder so the 6010 is a no brainer. Back to the question at hand tho i was just the difference in how they burn what makes them act that way and things of that nature. Thanks
    EXX10 have a Cellulose-sodium flux. The gas shield created contains carbon dioxide and hydrogen, which are reducing agents. These gases tend to produce a digging arc that provides deep penetration. The weld deposit is somewhat rough, and the spatter is at a higher level than other electrodes. They provide extremely good mechanical properties, especially after aging. They were one of the earliest rods developed, and are widely used on cross-country pipelines using the "downhill" welding technique. This is a "DC" only rod, primarily on DC+

    EXX11 have a Cellulose-potassium flux. It is very similar to cellulose-sodium, except the potasium provides ionization of the arc and makes this electrode suitable for AC welding. Sometimes small amounts of iron powder are added, which assists in the arc stabilization, and increasing the deposition rate.

    EXX13 have a Rutile-potassium flux. They have similar characteristics to EXX12 electrodes (rutile-sodium), but again, the postassium provides for arc-stabilization, making this sutiable for AC/DC+/DC-. It produces a very "quiet," smooth running arc, low level of spatter, and an easily controlled slag.

    Dave
    Last edited by davedarragh; 11-25-2009 at 06:09 PM.
    "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

  5. #5
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    Default

    Quotes from the Lincoln "Bible".

    E6010 : This is the basic fast-freeze electrode for general purpose DC welding. Light slag and good wash-in permit excellent control of the arc. The 6010 electrode is particularly valuable for critical out of position applications such as with pipe welding.

    E6011: A general fast-freeze electrode for use in industrial AC welders, E6011 is also the preferred electrode for sheet metal edge, corner, and butt welds with DCEN. The electrode is also used for vertical down welding, and for applications requiring exceptionally low silicon deposit. Special grades are available for general purpose shop use with small, low open circuit voltage AC welders (not suitable for X-ray quality). E6011 is also available in a special grade producing little slag, that is designed especially for tack welding.

    E6012: The basic fill freeze electrode for general purpose and production welding, this electrode provides a more forceful arc than other electrodes in the group. Special types are available for improved arc stability, minimum spatter, and easier slag removal. Some types contain iron powder in the coatings for greater mileage, better AC operation, and a smoother, quieter arc. These types are excellent for low current applications, such as sheet metal welding.

    E6013: This electrode is used in place of E6012 for sheet metal welding where appearance and ease of operation are more important than speed. AC operation is excellent. It is recommended for general purpose welding with small AC transformer welding machines having low open circuit voltage.

    So there you go. All in a nutshell from a major manufacturer.
    By the way, E6013 is not generally regarded as a deep penetrating rod. It is very useful in the smaller diameters with the thinner sheet metal applications.

  6. #6
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    Default

    6013 is not a deep penetrating rod like 6010/11 are. 6013 also doesn't need to be whipped and paused to run, as 6010/11 are.
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  7. #7
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    Default

    Excellent replies and information. Sorry if I but in on you're thread but I was hoping to learn more about this "whipping". I'm not really familiar with the term and I like to run 6011. Any info would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

  8. #8
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    Default "Whipping"

    Quote Originally Posted by Fruecrue View Post
    Excellent replies and information. Sorry if I but in on you're thread but I was hoping to learn more about this "whipping". I'm not really familiar with the term and I like to run 6011. Any info would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
    Visit: www.thefabricator.com

    Marty Rice has a very good article regarding this.

    Dave
    "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

  9. #9
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    Default

    Yes, whip and pause is the very essence of 10 and 11 welding. Sometimes the way to learn is to be shown. No easy way around it. Many variations of it, put spot, let cool, put another spot etc.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Sberry; 11-25-2009 at 08:21 PM.

  10. #10
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    Oct 2009
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    Cool

    Thanks for the link Dave and the pics Sberry. Can't wait to burn + learn.

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