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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    49

    Default welding hydraulic cylinders?

    Has any one ever welded on a hydraulic cylinder before. I have a forklift and the main hydaulic cylinder is gouged in a few places and was wondering if i could weld a few beads on it and then grind it flush again. Has anyone ran into this before and if so what kind of filler metal and settings would you use. My plan was to tig it.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Ottawa Canada
    Posts
    494

    Default We need pics!

    One good start would be for you to post some pics of what you're facing.There are people who can point you in the right direction here but we need to see what you see,Frank
    Millermatic 252
    Millermatic 180
    Dynasty 200DX
    Hobart spoolmate 3035
    Digital Elite

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    1,508

    Default

    Caution!
    These are "my" views based only on “my” experiences in “my” little bitty world.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    2,949

    Default Hydraulic Cylinders

    Quote Originally Posted by stretch View Post
    Has any one ever welded on a hydraulic cylinder before. I have a forklift and the main hydaulic cylinder is gouged in a few places and was wondering if i could weld a few beads on it and then grind it flush again. Has anyone ran into this before and if so what kind of filler metal and settings would you use. My plan was to tig it.
    Stretch: Is it leaking? Not even going to ask how the "gouges" got there.

    Hydraulic cylinders can be chromium clad, 316 stainless, 413 stainless, but regardless, they are precision machined to insure proper sealing.

    Maybe one of our Machinist Members can contribute some more information.

    If it were me, I'd replace it.

    Dave
    "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Atl, Ga
    Posts
    371

    Default

    I did a similar fix on an old farm dump truck cylinder by filing out the nick and using epoxy fill. Blended out epoxy with a brown Roloc wheel. It was just to keep the seal from getting torn up - hardness/color match didn't matter much.

    I would NOT do this repair on a forklift - way too much liability.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Salem ,Ohio
    Posts
    3,913

    Cool

    Bob Wright, Grandson of Tee Nee Boat Trailer Founder
    Metal Master Fab Salem, Oh 44460
    Birthplace of the Silver & Deming Drill
    1999 MM185 w/185 Spoolgun,1986 Thunderbolt AC/DC
    Spool Gun conversion. How To Do It. Below.
    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...php?albumid=48

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Lodi, CA
    Posts
    1,280

    Default

    I have built cylinders, I have modified cylinders, I have repaired cylinders. The big thing to remember, if you are welding anywhere near the middle of the cylinder, shrinkage IS a possibility. Even to the point, that the piston won't make it thru. Even welding cracks, at the top end or the bottom end, it's possible to tighten everything up, to the point the piston will jam.

    How bad are the gouges?? Just slight ones, not leaking, cosmetic, consider doing nothing. If you do think they need to be fixed, low heat, keep the oil in the cylinder, use stringer passes, DON'T blow thru, letting it cool between passes. If you have the guts, peen them also, once not red-hot anymore.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Lodi, CA
    Posts
    1,280

    Default

    I'm reading the original post here, I assume gouges on the outside of the cylinder, not on the chrome shaft. Typical fix on the shaft, is get a new one. For a little-used machine, with a bad shaft, generally cheaper and better to just replace the seals every couple years.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Oswego IL
    Posts
    656

    Default ah...my my area...

    First where is the damage? If it is the barrel(barrel is not the chrome rod but the actual place the piston goes up and down in it) is it external, or internal? If its external and it is not leaking..dont touch it. If its external and leaking I have welded them in the past, but be worned barrels are round and welding will almost always put an out of round condition and the wear rings on the piston will wear quickly. If it is internal, IE the piston gland gouged it, the barrel is junk.. Any good cylinder shop can repair it, basically they replace the barrel. As for the rod, gouges can be welded then the cylinder rod must be rechromed. None of these are difficult to accomplish. I do have a few vendors if you need contacts. They are located in Naperville, IL.
    Kevin
    XMT 304
    Miller Spectrum 625
    Miller 30a spool gun
    S22a
    Miller Legend 302
    Lincoln LN25
    Ford f450 Maintainer Srv Truck

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    1,508

    Default

    My local hydraulic shop / repair shop told me if a welded cylinder cost under 200.00 buy it! Labor to cut it open, reweld, and parts will eat up a 200 $ bill.
    Caution!
    These are "my" views based only on “my” experiences in “my” little bitty world.

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