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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Tallahassee, FL
    Posts
    67

    Question propane cutting torch

    I want to get a O/A cutting setup but then I heard about a propane option. Can anyone tell me about this before I purchase a Smith M-D O/A setup?
    Is it as good? Propane sounds like a bargain when it comes time to re-fill.
    Thanks
    Millermatic140; Spectrum625; Bobcat250; Lincoln AC225; Bosch grinder

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Estevan, Sask
    Posts
    111

    Default

    I've used them a couple times. They work ok. Not as hot of a flame produced by propane compared to acetylene so it takes a little more pre heat time. It was a long time ago, but i think it is just a different kind of tip (2 piece) that you put in a regular torch??

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Abilene, Texas
    Posts
    639

    Default

    I've never used a propane cutting torch, but from what I've seen they are used more in scrap metal places where they only need to hack something apart and don't care about the quality of the cut. They probably operate cheaper than acetylene but I've never seen a professional welder use propane.
    Jim

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    8

    Default

    My last shop used propane exclusively. I grew to like it. It's alot slower (more preheat like mentioned) but i found it produced a much cleaner cut. As far as cost comparison I have no idea. What i do know is that with propane your gas valve needs to be alot more open than the "quarter turn" of an acetylene valve.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    8

    Default forgot to mention....

    Yes, the tips are different. I'm not an expert on gases, or torches for that matter, but from what I've been told.....Propane is a low pressure gas which requires a special tip to increase the flow of gas to allow it to cut. Unlike an acetylene tip, which has a center orifice surrounded by a number of gas orifices which are all round in shape, the propane tip has a center orifice surrounded by a bunch of tightly grouped slits that are recessed. Getting back to why I replied a second time ....... the propane tips tend to be a little bit harder to clean.

    ok now im done good luck w ur decision

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Tallahassee, FL
    Posts
    67

    Default

    Will they sell the propane tank at the same place as the oxygen?
    I wonder what the price difference is...
    Millermatic140; Spectrum625; Bobcat250; Lincoln AC225; Bosch grinder

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Tallahassee, FL
    Posts
    67

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim-TX View Post
    I've never used a propane cutting torch, but from what I've seen they are used more in scrap metal places where they only need to hack something apart and don't care about the quality of the cut. They probably operate cheaper than acetylene but I've never seen a professional welder use propane.
    My friend worked at a shipyard in the south for many years and he said propane is all they used. I should go see what he suggests...
    Millermatic140; Spectrum625; Bobcat250; Lincoln AC225; Bosch grinder

  8. #8

    Default Tip

    The tip is the only thing you have to change. If you take the tip out of the torch it comes apart to clean. It takes a while to heat the item up, but cuts great and is a lot less the acetylene. More pressure is needed, once you get on to it works fine.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Northern CA, Shasta CO.
    Posts
    144

    Default

    For long term use with propane your fuel hose should be a 'T' grade hose.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Abilene, Texas
    Posts
    639

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CarbedNotch View Post
    My friend worked at a shipyard in the south for many years and he said propane is all they used. I should go see what he suggests...
    Obviously I have not been in a shipyard. From the sounds of it, propane is more popular than I realized. I just don't see much of it used around here.
    Jim

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