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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    56

    Default

    Kmomaha,
    OUTSTANDING!!!!! The attention to detail is just amazing. Thanks for sharing that.

    jrw159

    EDIT: Just looked at your other stuff, WOW.
    Last edited by jrw159; 08-06-2009 at 10:01 AM.

  2. #12

    Default

    Have you ever photo-documented one of these projects beginning to end? Then a clod like me, lacking any artistic talent whatever, could get a clue as to what is entailed in the making of your small masterpiece. I don't mean instruction in technique, just a means whereby we could appreciate the process as well as the finished piece, which is so detailed I can hardly begin to take it all in.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Columbia SC
    Posts
    165

    Default

    Super nice work.. thanks for sharing
    Jim

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    banning ca.
    Posts
    135

    Default

    wow
    very nice, great job
    Unreal amount of detail on that. not many people could even come close to work/art like this.
    gary

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    11

    Default

    That's beautiful work.
    Pipefitters Local 72, Atlanta

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Papillion, Nebraska
    Posts
    19

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by seattle smitty View Post
    Have you ever photo-documented one of these projects beginning to end? Then a clod like me, lacking any artistic talent whatever, could get a clue as to what is entailed in the making of your small masterpiece. I don't mean instruction in technique, just a means whereby we could appreciate the process as well as the finished piece, which is so detailed I can hardly begin to take it all in.
    Seattle Smitty;
    Here is a Facebook site where I have started a photo thread on a repeat of the Beet Harvester project.

    http://www.facebook.com/album.php?ai...2&l=8862cd394e

    Let me know if you can't get to it. kmomaha@cox.net

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Mt. Clemens, Michigan
    Posts
    277

    Default

    SO sweet dude! I've checked out you work before, I dig it a lot!

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Papillion, Nebraska
    Posts
    19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by UH60LCHIEF View Post
    Cool.... Very very cool. How did you get the coloring?
    I wash the piece in 100% muriatic acid (available at any hardware store). Then rinse it with clear water. It then flashes to rust as it is drying, or I can hasten it by spraying with vinegar. Even let it sit overnight. You get the most beautiful rust. If I don't want a part rusted. I use an artists brush and paint the rust with phosphoric acid (naval jelly) available from any autoparts store or K-mart. For large quantities see: <click here> This converts the iron oxide to zinc oxide. Basically galvanizing it. Gun blueing can give you black, or I use a jewelers torch and just burn it a little. You can also get blue if you clean the part to bare metal and use a torch on it. Once I am hapy with the color I spray it with about 4 coats of clear acrylic enamel (Rustoleum). The paint will darken the piece so take that into account.

    If it gets dull after years of display I disassemble from the wood base and give it a real quick bath with lacquer thinner, let it dry, then respray it.

    Thanks for the acolades! I also really enjoy looking at other artistic creations on this site, including the full size useful and functional creations. Ken

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Papillion, Nebraska
    Posts
    19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jdustu View Post
    SO sweet dude! I've checked out you work before, I dig it a lot!
    Looked over your creations. I assume the refrences were yours. Very artistic. I just don't have the abstract ability for the smooth lines I see in your work. Very nice. Very different. I started out with some sparkplug art and a few things similar to yours. Things kept growing. I like the high detailing. Result of my 35 years of drafting and mechanical designing. One piece that was popular that I did was a man standing at an engine stand with an engine block made out of hex nuts for cylinders etc. Engine stand made out of sq. key stock. ... thanks again...Ken

  10. #20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kmomaha View Post
    I wash the piece in 100% muriatic acid (available at any hardware store). Then rinse it with clear water. It then flashes to rust as it is drying, or I can hasten it by spraying with vinegar. Even let it sit overnight. You get the most beautiful rust. If I don't want a part rusted. I use an artists brush and paint the rust with phosphoric acid (naval jelly) available from any autoparts store or K-mart. For large quantities see: <click here> This converts the iron oxide to zinc oxide. Basically galvanizing it. Gun blueing can give you black, or I use a jewelers torch and just burn it a little. You can also get blue if you clean the part to bare metal and use a torch on it. Once I am hapy with the color I spray it with about 4 coats of clear acrylic enamel (Rustoleum). The paint will darken the piece so take that into account.

    If it gets dull after years of display I disassemble from the wood base and give it a real quick bath with lacquer thinner, let it dry, then respray it.

    Thanks for the acolades! I also really enjoy looking at other artistic creations on this site, including the full size useful and functional creations. Ken

    Thanks for the tips on how you get the different colorings. I've been wondering how some people get their colors, and this helps a lot.

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