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  1. #21

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    Isn't the galvanized surface a really bad thing for welding? Any time you burn it, it will make you sick. I think you have to grind or etch the zinc off before welding on the table anyway, unless you manage to never cook the surface, which seems impossible.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    180

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    Quote Originally Posted by lens42 View Post
    Isn't the galvanized surface a really bad thing for welding? Any time you burn it, it will make you sick. I think you have to grind or etch the zinc off before welding on the table anyway, unless you manage to never cook the surface, which seems impossible.
    The galvanized top is only a potential problem if parts are welded to it to secure them for fabrication. Used outdoors (as I do) it hasn't been and I don't think will be a problem. Clamping, using magnets or weighting parts down usually presents no problem. I may even drill and tap threads in a few holes for the ability to screw down parts. There are already a few spots where things were welded on and then the welds ground off. Overall the galvanization just keeps it from rusting. If it becomes a worry, I'll flip the top.

    One end has been freed up from the stitch welds that held the top to the frame and I'm looking for a way to jack it up 3/16" or so from the frame to insert a few shims. Initially, I'll try to flatten the top that way. I'll advise.
    Last edited by Dmaxer; 07-25-2009 at 01:58 AM. Reason: spelling
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  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Southern NH
    Posts
    233

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    is there some purpose for welding the top to the frame? my welding table top is 1/2" thick and is roughly a 3' x 6'. it just sits free floating on the table frame that i made. the top weighs like 350 pounds by itself-- it never moves. where could it possibly go? even if i wanted to slide the top across the frame, it takes a monumental effort. welding the top to the table seems pointless.

    after you cut the top free and straighten it, i would just let it lay on the frame and use it that way.
    miller dynasty 350
    miller spectrum 1000

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    180

    Default

    It's fixed. I cut out about 44 welds, all except for those attaching the top to the center crosspiece. Used a bottle jack from the end crosspieces halfway up the legs to raise each corner and insert shims where necessary. I liked the idea of using weighted wire (I used a length of .035 mig wire) held off the table by small blocks at each end to check flatness. I had to readjust the shims a couple of times until I got it right. Thanks Sonora Iron for that suggestion. I don't intend to do any more welding between the top and the frame for now. If it ever warps again, it'll be easier to adjust with it like this.

    Thanks to everyone who responded. This members of this site have a wealth of experience and when they share it, there is no better advice.
    Miller XMT-350 CC/CV
    Miller S-22A wirefeeder
    Bernard 400A "Q" gun
    Miller 30-A Spoolmatic w/WC-24
    CK 210 & WP-18 GTAW torches
    Hypertherm Powermax 30
    O/A Rig, Enco 4x6 bandsaw, etc.

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