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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    near rochester NY
    Posts
    9,881

    Thumbs down its just not feasable to try to increase the duty cycle

    it would be less $$ to just buy a new unit.
    nothing realistically can be done to increase a duty cycle. air temp will effect it, but as a hole it is what it is due to design. if you need 100% duty cycle you just have to get a welder with a higher top end to give you 100% at the amp you need. if you need 135amps at 100% Duty cycle you need to buy a 200amp welder, its that simple. no shortcuts just design and function.
    you just need to work slower of get a larger welder. i suspect heat sinks could help a little but if you want to spend big $$ to increase the duty cycle just buy a water cooler and attach it to the heat sinks to reduce the core temp. again spending more $$ to fix this one than it would be to buy a new larger welder.
    if its about available wall power, than you need to look at inverters to get you more output per wall amp. i had to get an inverter as i could only offer a welder a 30amp 240V circuit. again i am still limited to the duty cycle of the inverter and would never consider opening it up to try to increase the duty cycle. no space to play inside it any way. but in the winter i do get better cycle times (due to colder air being pulled threw it)
    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped

    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
    summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
    JAMES

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    13

    Default

    this is a project, i cant just buy a new welder.. the project objective is increase the duty cycle of this machine. please help me what can i do to increase the duty cycle of this machine? give any idea do you have..
    thank you very much.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Central Fla.
    Posts
    311

    Default

    Windson - Please don't take this the wrong way, but your answer is in the previous posts.

    When a transformer is designed, it is designed for a particular temperature range. If you exceed this range for any length of time without interruption devices in place, the winding will fail and you will have a paper weight.

    The only way you can increase the duty cycle (load limit) of a transformer is to supercool it. You would achieve some capacity increase though how much I don't know. This, however, isn't a perfect world either. Too cold and insulation becomes brittle and with heating of the core and expansion it too will fail. Without knowing the electrical engineering approach this unit was designed around, it is not possible to tell you what these limits are.

    You mention this is a "project". Without getting too personal, would this be for school or a personal quest? Either way, good luck.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Deltaville, VA
    Posts
    2,239

    Default

    Windson,

    Where are you writing from? It would help to know where you're coming from.

    With regards to your question about whether the output was AC or DC. It is DC. The specs you published showed 25.5 Vdc @115A and 26 Vdc @ 138A. Can't imagine what's so difficult about that.

    Not trying to be a smarta$$, but you seem to have trouble understanding English.

    Several posters have already stated (and correctly so) that it is not feasible/possible to significantly increase the duty cycle of the welder in question. Welders are "designed" to produce a certain output at a certain duty cycle. Components are designed to work in consonance with one another. As soon as you start "beefing up" one component, another component down the line fails.

    Your question has been answered, you just don't like what people are saying.

    PS Your other posting regarding preparation, combined with this post, leads me to believe you've got a lot of reading/study to do before you're ready to strike the first arc. With that said, what's the big deal about "duty cycle"?

    Later
    Last edited by SundownIII; 09-06-2007 at 06:41 PM.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    near rochester NY
    Posts
    9,881

    Default

    if i had to increase the duty cycle for a project be it a school thing or a bet with a Friend i think i would make some heat sinks with water channels so i could use a cooler to run cold water threw the heat sinks attached to the transformer.
    some aluminum heat sinks set up to use water to help cool attached to the transformer and then add a standard welding torch cooler to cool the water. many easy ways to build a cooler and the heat sinks could be as simple or complicated as you saw fit.
    best of luck.
    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped

    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
    summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
    JAMES

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fun4now View Post
    if i had to increase the duty cycle for a project be it a school thing or a bet with a Friend i think i would make some heat sinks with water channels so i could use a cooler to run cold water threw the heat sinks attached to the transformer.
    some aluminum heat sinks set up to use water to help cool attached to the transformer and then add a standard welding torch cooler to cool the water. many easy ways to build a cooler and the heat sinks could be as simple or complicated as you saw fit.
    best of luck.

    the heat sink with water channel will costly?
    can sir tell me more detail about this heat sink, as well as give me a photo for reference.
    thank you.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Abilene, Texas
    Posts
    639

    Default

    This is unreal.
    Jim

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Deltaville, VA
    Posts
    2,239

    Default

    Sounds like someone wants someone else to do his school project for him.

    When I was in school that was called plagiarism.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Abilene, Texas
    Posts
    639

    Default

    Well so far we don't know if it's a school project or if he's too tight or broke to buy a welder that he needs plus we have no idea of where he lives in spite of being asked. Pretty hopeless from my point of view.

    Edit: Sorry for my attitude. It's been a long day.
    Last edited by Jim-TX; 09-06-2007 at 10:24 PM.
    Jim

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    I live in Cheraw, South Carolina
    Posts
    112

    Default

    Windson,

    The heat sink should have as much surface area as possible. Most heat sinks have fins to increase surface area. You want it to conduct heat well so it should be made out of aluminum. They make heat sink compound that is used on rectifiers to increase the thermal conductivity between the heat sink surface and the surface of the rectifier component to be cooled. You should use some of this when you mount the heat sinks. The mating surface of the heat sink should be as smooth and flat as possible. The heat sink should be mounted so it is as tight against the transformer as possible. The torque should be one half turn less than what it takes to break either the bolts or the heat sink.

    Your welder is AC only. The DC voltage specification is a not correct. This specification is an error on the drawing. You don't get DC out of the secondary of a transformer. There are no diodes necessary for rectification to get DC. The fact that this welder was made in Malaysia is probably why you have the error on the drawing - something was lost in translation. Trust me, the welder is AC only.

    Now, if you want to increase capacity I can tell you how to do it very cheaply, but it will only work one time. If you look at the primary of the transformer you will see the tap switch. Just above the tap switch is the high limit temperature switch. When you find the tap switch just follow the wire and you will come to the high limit switch. It will be mounted on the transformer surface so it can sense the temperature of the transformer. Now, this switch is what we call in the electrical field Normally closed (N.C.). The way it works is it is normally closed until a certain temperature is reached and then its contacts will open taking power off the transformer. The welder fan will continue to run, and when enough heat has been taken away, the contacts will close again and you can strike up another arc. It does this automatically so you don't have to manually reset anything.

    Now the cheap way to increase the duty cycle, and remember I said it will only work one time, is to jump out the high limit temperature switch. Now I can't tell you how long the duty cycle will last but I can assure you it will last until the transformer starts smoking and finally gives up and dies. And boy will it stink. An experienced electrician can many times tell you what has burned up just from the smell, and a transformer is easy to identify.

    Now I must warn you that anytime you experiment with something that has 240 volts like the transformer has on the primary, you should be very careful. 250 milliamps ( just a quarter of an amp) through the heart will stop it or send it into fibrillation. Be sure to unplug the welder before jumping out the temperature switch. Please don't hold me liable if you don't.

    Now Windsom, in all fairness, be honest with us now, haven't you been pulling our leg a little bit. In our southern idiom pulling someones leg means the same thing as joking around with them. And that one on the
    metal- that was a good one too.
    6010
    If I had know I was going to live this long, I would have taken better care of myself.

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