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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    39

    Default Ten bucks will save your skin!

    If you don't have them, you can get these "canvas" sleeves to use with a t-shirt or other garment for extra protection. They are nice if you rest one arm on the welding table for support. They are about $10 at your local welding shop.
    Don't forget to increase the darkness of your lens as you increase amperage of your welds.
    Hi-freq. TIG will degrade cotton (as will MIG to a certain extent) and may not adequately protect you from the arc rays produced during welding. (ie: sunburn) But ANY skin protection is better than no protection!

    True story: a cig. smoking friend of mine was welding when his jeans started smoldering from a bit of slag. After a bit of dancing and prancing to put the fire out, he felt he needed a cigarette. That is when we noticed the "almost" that fortunately never was. The bit of slag that caused the fire had also melted into his BIC lighter! One can only think of the catastophy that could of happened! The moral to this story is to not leave flammable items in your pockets unless you want your nuggets blown off and/or hair singed (if you don't have nuggets)(or worse)...
    TA Arcmaster 185 w/TIG/Stick Kit
    MM210 w/3535 Frankengun
    MM140 w/o AS w/SM100 & CO2
    Hobart (Miller) 625 Plasma
    Hobart 250ci Plasma
    Victor O/A (always ready, but bored)
    Lincoln Patriot Autodark (freebie)
    .45ACP Black Talons for those difficult jobs

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    S.W. Pennsylvania
    Posts
    2,249

    Default

    I'm not sure of this but I think Osha prohibits cigaret lighter in the welding area and it could result in a fine. (heard it from someone who is not an athority of any kind).
    To all who contribute to this board.
    My sincere thanks , Pete.

    Pureox OA
    Westinghouse 300 amp AC stick
    Miller Syncrowave 250
    Hexacon 250 watt solder iron

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    markham, ontario, canada
    Posts
    7

    Default

    i have a nasty scar on my chest [just below left peck] from falling hot slag...

    i was doing some overhead welding at work on dirty rusty locomotive carbody where i needed to weld a threaded insert in a channel to allow the roof sections to be secured [home made insert by using a 3/4" flat washer and pressing in a 1/2" nut and tacking it in place and clipping the washer to make it oval to slip in the channel] and it was rustyer than i thought it was and it was in a position where i couldn't really reach [could only burn about 4" of the rod before i couldn't reach] and well, the rusty metal gave way and a big marble sized molten glob dropped down on me.. i was wearing a jacket, but it wasn't buttoned tight around my neck as i couldn't move freely with it buttoned so high, but it hit my neck below my ear [right where the mask ended ] and rolled down my neck, down under my jacket and tee shirt, and i reacted by holding the slag where it made the burn just below my left peck so i had time to untuck my tee shirt from my pants... yeah it left a very nasty burn [2nd degree i guess - still felt pain in the area] but i'd rather have a burn there than have that burn below the belt line

    i still hate overhead welding with the stick
    Nick Leinonen

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    N/W Pa.
    Posts
    39

    Smile Overhead and Bic lighters

    Overhead is never pleasent . Back when I smoked , I had been told that you shouldn't carry a Bic lighter when welding . I thought yeah right , until one of the fitters working with us in the fab shop left his welding jacket hang on the back of a chair close to a positioner ,where we were welding . While grinding one of the fill passes his jacket caught fire and the cheap butane lighter blew up. Scared the dog dodo out of the welder and me . That night after work I went and bought a Zippo . Better lighter and American made in Bradford , Pa.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Jax, FL
    Posts
    12

    Default

    everyting I'm hearing makes me very glad that all I came away with was a burn
    Time to learn & Time to burn...

  6. #16

    Default Safety first

    I don't know about the rest of you - I can't find or create enough welding projects! There is one thing I always keep in mind - I was born with a certain numbr of extermities - ears, eyes, fingers, toes, etc and they don't grow back.

    I never fried my skin doing my mig projects. I had some very crusty peelings after my first TIG welding poject...

    I'm covered from head to toe now before I fire up the machines...

    Steve

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    N/W Pa.
    Posts
    39

    Exclamation Safety , Number One Job.

    All of the Mechanical Contractors I have worked for have a safety meeting after lunch on Thursday or Friday , most of them use a Commerical program covering a certian aspect of safety , like proper tool maintence , electrical cord safety and inspection , etc. It can be a pain in the butt to stand there and listen to the foreman read the weekly message but it does remind you to work in a safe manner , and if you see something that is not safe to notify him about it and he can get it taken care of . At home in your own shop , you are the worker the foreman and the owner of the company , so you are the only one you can blame for allowing an unsafe condition to exist . In another post I asked CamaroZach if he had welding stands , and if he didn't if he would like some plans . He got back to me and I emailed him the plans , simple to build , not cheap and flimsy , and very adjustable . I was concerned in what he was using to support his project , I have seen and read in the newspaper about people using cement blocks and other jury rigged stands who sadly are no longer with us . I admit the are times when proper blocking and cribbing are the only way . But you use wood not cement blocks . So be careful out there and remember the goal for the day is to leave work with all your fingers , toes , and your most important thing your eyesight , at work or at home Be Safe . Dan . P.S. If you want a set of plans PM me with your email address .
    Last edited by Lu47Dan; 03-16-2006 at 06:15 PM.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Jax, FL
    Posts
    12

    Default

    Thanks for sharing your experiences with me. You guys are right, all of the TV shows show welding being done with little thought about the example they are setting for people who are unexperienced. I would have never thought of buying some of the PPE that is out there were it not for hearing these stories. I've delayed my purchase of a new welder, in favor of some better safety equipment, and some books to educate me about the risks associated with welding. I am still looking for a new machine, but only when I know a little more.
    Thx guys
    Time to learn & Time to burn...

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Calgary, AB
    Posts
    52

    Default

    Just my 2 cents. The UV coming off a stick welder is 20X the sun! The UV coming off a Mig/Tig is 40-50X the sun!!! To put this in perspective, say you spent 8 hours in your shop one day building a project with your mig welder. It would be safe to say that you had you welder running for 4 hours of that day. Any exposed skin has just absorbed the equivalent UV as being outside in the sun for 160 hours!!!!! I won't weld without my jean jacket as a minimum, and that's only if I forgot my leathers at home! 98% of the time I have my leather welding jacket and my Carhart overalls. Just remember that denim does catch fire easily when it's frayed (been there, done that).
    Maybe someone here can correct me if I'm wrong, but I seem to remember my Instructor in college (too many years ago) saying that Borox (Borex?) laundry detergent mixed with something else (or maybe it was just straight Borox) will make your cloths fire resistant (resistant, not proof!!).
    Let's remember to be safe. To many smart people die each year from doing something dumb, because they were in too much of a hurry to do it right.
    And remember UV=cancer (proven or unproven, is your life and the people you leave behind worth the chance).
    I'll get off my soapbox now, and no, I don't give change from a nickel for my 2 cents-LOL.
    The difference between No One. and No. One is where you put the period. John Force

  10. #20

    Default

    Come on guys you are way over kill on this...he is from Florida. The unofficial welding uniform of Florida is shorts, flip flop sandals, a tee shirt and 2 pair of sunglasses

    OK on the serious side. If it can burn it will while welding. You only have 2 eyes and they haven't come up with an aftermarket replacement for them, buy a good shield. Leather lacket with a bib front works great, good gloves, leather boots and heavy cotton trousers or canvas trousers. So with all that protection you are going to sweat buckets, drink lots of water and often. Being in Jacksonville I have experienced the summers and welding...lots of fun.

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