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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    2

    Default stick welding stainless exhaust

    Hi all
    new here, I've been on the fence debating whether to get a MIG or stick welder. yeah I know most people would say go with the MIG, but for me getting argon would be inconvenient and I will be using the welder outdoors and be suseptible to breezes and wind.
    I've see stainless steel welding rods offered for stick welders so it looks like it's possible.

    Just want to get an opinion on welding stainless steel exhausts. I've see some rods offered in 1/16 size, so I'm hoping that won't blow through the exhaust material.
    I know vertical welding with stick can be tough, but I can always remove the exhaust weld so it won't be a vertical weld.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Salem ,Ohio
    Posts
    3,895

    Cool

    1/16" SS rod is great. I welded a V8 conversion in a 70's Vega with the tiny rod and we all know how thick Vega rails are...Bob
    Bob Wright, Grandson of Tee Nee Boat Trailer Founder
    Metal Master Fab Salem, Oh 44460
    Birthplace of the Silver & Deming Drill
    1999 MM185 w/185 Spoolgun,1986 Thunderbolt AC/DC
    Spool Gun conversion. How To Do It. Below.
    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...php?albumid=48

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    835

    Default

    I strongly recommend getting a 240 volt MIG setup.

    The idea that you can't MIG weld outdoors in even the slightest breeze is nonsense. I can sail my catamaran on days that I could still MIG weld outside. Yes, there is a point where you can't, but you can adjust parameters such as higher gas flow and closer contact tip to work distance to overcome this. And don't forget a simple wind shield.

    And when that point comes, you can use .045" self shielding flux core outdoors in windy conditions and lay down nicer beads faster in any position than you can with 1/8" rods. I use it all the time. It makes really good welds.

    If you get an AC stick welder to start out on, you will become very frustrated very quickly. And the welds will look like crap and they will break. It happens to everyone who is learning, but it's especially hard to start out on an AC machine.

    Don't get me wrong. I've used Blue Max electrodes and made stainless welds that looked like TIG welds, but it took YEARS to get there. Don't expect to pick up a buzzbox and make welds that don't look ugly even for a bulldozer.
    Last edited by Bodybagger; 05-19-2009 at 08:40 PM.
    Equipped with red and blue... and red and green!
    80% of failures are from 20% of causes
    Never compromise your principles today in the name of furthering them in the future.
    "All I ever wanted was an honest week's pay for an honest day's work." -Sgt. Bilko
    "We are generally better persuaded by reasons we discover ourselves than by those given to us by others." -Pascal
    "Since we cannot know all that there is to be known about anything, we ought to know a little about everything." -Pascal

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    2

    Default

    thanks guys

    Bodybagger:
    what do you think about DC stick welders? I hear they are better then AC
    also for me 220 is gonna b a problem as I only have 120 at home. I guess I could get wired for 220 at home, but if I do welding at a friends garage, at church, etc... they won't have 220, so I'm limited in not being able to move the welder to other locations

    I was looking at the Lincoln Century Inverter Arc 120v dc stick welder

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Salem ,Ohio
    Posts
    3,895

    Cool

    One other avenue to look down is a used mig welder. I see lots of them in pawn shops when i go in to snoop around. There are some good deals there. But like everything else used you have to know what you are looking for. My local one has elec to try it out first but some may not...Bob
    Bob Wright, Grandson of Tee Nee Boat Trailer Founder
    Metal Master Fab Salem, Oh 44460
    Birthplace of the Silver & Deming Drill
    1999 MM185 w/185 Spoolgun,1986 Thunderbolt AC/DC
    Spool Gun conversion. How To Do It. Below.
    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...php?albumid=48

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    2,949

    Default Mm 211

    kmn5: As a suggestion, the new MM 211 comes with MVP input, and ou can always get the optional spool gun for welding on stainless.

    Keep in mind, you'll need tri-mix for ss solid wire, C-25 or 100% CO2 for solid MIG wire.

    At least you could use the unit running off of a 20 amp/120 V circuit until you get 220 installed.

    SS solid wire is available in 4" spools (a lot cheaper), and even though flux-cored stainless uses C-25 or 100% CO2, most of these wires are available in 25# (12") spools.

    Dave
    "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    835

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kmn5 View Post
    Bodybagger:
    what do you think about DC stick welders? I hear they are better then AC
    A good introductory model (such as the Thunderbolt AC/DC or the Lincoln AC/DC 225/125) is better, but they cost twice as much as a buzzbox.

    Now when I say better, I mean (on a scale of 1 to 10) they have a difficulty of 8, where AC stick has a difficulty of 10, and MIG has a difficulty of 1, and flux core has a difficulty of 3.
    Quote Originally Posted by kmn5 View Post
    I was looking at the Lincoln Century Inverter Arc 120v dc stick welder
    STEER WELL CLEAR OF ANYTHING THAT CLAIMS TO STICK WELD ON 120 VOLTS THAT COSTS LESS THAN $1000. IT IS NOTHING MORE THAN A GLORIFIED BATTERY CHARGER.

    Now since you're already going to be spending 500-750 for a good DC welder, just buy a 240V MIG.
    Quote Originally Posted by kmn5 View Post
    also for me 220 is gonna b a problem as I only have 120 at home. I guess I could get wired for 220 at home, but if I do welding at a friends garage, at church, etc... they won't have 220, so I'm limited in not being able to move the welder to other locations
    You've probably got 240 volts. Do you have a clothes dryer? Does it run on 120 volts? Probably not. Do they have a clothes dryer?

    Get a 100' 10 ga yellow jacket cord at Lowes for 92 dollars and put a welder receptacle on one end and a dryer plug on the other. Then you can weld within 100' of the dryer outlet. You can do this with a 240V MIG welder such as the Pro MIG 180 or Power MIG 180, but you CANNOT do this with a transformer based stick welder because it will trip the existing 30 amp breaker that feeds the dryer.

    Also, there is another little trick you can use to get 240V. Since virtually every place with residential electric already has 120/240, you just need to make a pigtail with two cords leading into a NEMA 6-50R receptacle. Plug into two outlets on different circuits and there is a 50/50 chance you'll have 240 volts at the plug. I have a pigtail like this and it's as handy as a shirt pocket.

    Anyway, stick is going to frustrate you. It should be learned in a welding class. It's really hard to learn on your own. I've never heard anyone say a monkey could stick weld anything.
    Equipped with red and blue... and red and green!
    80% of failures are from 20% of causes
    Never compromise your principles today in the name of furthering them in the future.
    "All I ever wanted was an honest week's pay for an honest day's work." -Sgt. Bilko
    "We are generally better persuaded by reasons we discover ourselves than by those given to us by others." -Pascal
    "Since we cannot know all that there is to be known about anything, we ought to know a little about everything." -Pascal

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