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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    melbourne australia
    Posts
    16

    Default aus weld

    Ok dave, WIA is the preferd rod for the pro's and esab rod's a close second, as i'm in the building game i speek to, watch and notice what they use and as best i can and how they go about it with out getting under there feet, if your wondering how i came about my name midseries i'm 70% through restoring a 65 [midseries corvette], allright big dave, hope to here from you later. Andy..ps, cig and boc are by far the most popular domestic brand here......
    Last edited by midseries; 04-12-2009 at 08:30 PM. Reason: forgot stuff

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Hazelwood Mo USA
    Posts
    460

    Default

    The 6013 is not the best choice for a person to learn vertical up either.
    Get some 6010 or 6011 and I think it will be easier for you to learn.
    The 7018 has a lot of flux on it, and it was tough for me to run up hand, I was never profiecent with it!
    I liked the Lincoln rod 6010 or 5P, the 6011 has a bit different flux on it and it didnt read the same to me, the end results were the same though.
    The name of the game is practice though, there is no substitute for that.........
    I thought 6013 was the ac dc version of 6012?? That rod had a clay flux on it, was a good flat rod.

    mike sr

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Hampton, Va.
    Posts
    386

    Thumbs up

    Midseries, nfinch has given you great advice, follow it and you will be fine. This tecnique is what is used in the best shipbuilding welding schools.

    Good luck
    Wheelchair

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    2,949

    Default CigWeld

    Quote Originally Posted by midseries View Post
    Ok dave, WIA is the preferd rod for the pro's and esab rod's a close second, as i'm in the building game i speek to, watch and notice what they use and as best i can and how they go about it with out getting under there feet, if your wondering how i came about my name midseries i'm 70% through restoring a 65 [midseries corvette], allright big dave, hope to here from you later. Andy..ps, cig and boc are by far the most popular domestic brand here......
    Andy: Ironically, someone had a post regarding a Cigweld TIG 180 about a month or so ago.

    Thinking they were up by Brisbane or maybe Sidney, I'd have to find the post.


    Dave
    "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    2,949

    Default "Rods & Reels"

    Quote Originally Posted by popspipes View Post
    The 6013 is not the best choice for a person to learn vertical up either.
    Get some 6010 or 6011 and I think it will be easier for you to learn.
    The 7018 has a lot of flux on it, and it was tough for me to run up hand, I was never profiecent with it!
    I liked the Lincoln rod 6010 or 5P, the 6011 has a bit different flux on it and it didnt read the same to me, the end results were the same though.
    The name of the game is practice though, there is no substitute for that.........


    I thought 6013 was the ac dc version of 6012?? That rod had a clay flux on it, was a good flat rod.

    mike sr
    popspipes: 6010's are cellulose-sodium electrodes. The gas shield contains CO2 & Hydrogen gas, as reducing agents, that tend to produce the "digging" arc and deep penetration. DC+

    6011's are cellulose-potassium, that provides an ionization of the arc making it suitable, but not limited to AC. "Hard to learn, easy to use."

    6012's are rutile-sodium (titanium dioxide) and has a relatively low arc votage, high depostion, and low penetration. Used primarily on DC-

    6013's are rutile-potassium, and as with 6011's, the potassium provides for arc ionization and stabilization suitable, but not limited to AC welding. Instructors generally use this for first time students due it's soft arc and is "Easy to learn, hard to use."

    Then there is Lo-Hi sodium, potassium, iron powder, iron oxide sodium, iron oxide powder with multiple suffixes. The most common are E7018 H4R. Iron powder flux with maximum diffusible hyrdogen of 4ml per 100 grams.

    Stainless steel electrodes are also the lo-hydrogen type. (Red Baron, Blue Max)

    Hope this helps

    Dave
    "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Hazelwood Mo USA
    Posts
    460

    Default

    Thanks for the info Dave......

    mike sr

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Hazelwood Mo USA
    Posts
    460

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bert View Post
    Bert,
    I am not too good with explanations ha! I can show a person how to do it , explanation of the procedure is another matter.........
    I get the puddle going then whip up to cool it a bit, then come back down to the puddle and deposit material, I hesitate then whip the arc up and let the puddle cool a bit then repeat.
    The metal is deposited on the down stroke but stacks up in the verrtical direction on top of the puddle......... clear as mud ???

    mike sr

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Oahu, Hawaii
    Posts
    2,469

    Default

    Ok, cool...that's what I do too. Your first explanation sounded more like you were welding with some kind of alphabet weave (I was being polite), going downhill, since I haven't been around welding that many years (though taugt by a few of them), I thought maybe there was this "old school" technique (though I TOTALLY didn't agree with it)....2nd....MUCH better
    I'm not late...
    I'm just on Hawaiian Time

  9. #29

    Default

    The people in the U.S. recomending different rods need to keep in mind that 6013 is used by the thousands of (metric) ton every day in the UK (and several countries that follow the UK model like Australia, New Zealand, etc, etc).
    They weld pressure piping with those rods and have for decades.
    So, recomending what might be common practice in my area doesn't help a guy who's doing it right for his area.
    The UK model also runs straight beads in downhill cross country pipelines, can't do that in the U.S. either but advise can really be location specific.

    And the trick to getting slick in all position welds is of course practice, practice, practice and then practice some more. It comes faster for some people and slower for others. But a determined individual can become slick, it just takes more time and rod. I wasted I don't know how many pounds of rod before I could make a solid, workmanlike weld.
    In the learning process cranking the machine up and down is counterproductive in my mind assuming you are in the general ballpark. If your welds are looking poor, and your heat is close to good, then just burn that rod, It'll come. A lot of new guys look for the perfect setting on the machine when in reality they just need technique improvement. A slick welder can make a slick weld over a fairly broad range of amperages from way too cold to smoking hot, practice and developing technique trumps the "perfect" machine setting every time. If you can't (yet) really weld, there is no magic setting that will run a pretty cap as that lies in the hands of the welder. Look at the manufacturers recomended parameters for the particular rod, set the machine in the lower half of those parameters and burn rod. That's my best take on it.

    JTMcC
    Some days you eat the bear. And some days the bear eats you.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Hazelwood Mo USA
    Posts
    460

    Default

    I learn something new everey day!!

    mike sr

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