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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    melbourne australia
    Posts
    16

    Default vertical up help

    How's it going out there, i'm a newbe member and i was wondering if someone could help me with my vertical up welding, i'm using a 170 amp inverter stick welder with 3.2mm all position rods at 110 amps on 10mm plate and just can't get it happening ,it's all sages and lumps, has someone out there got a good simple way to help me get it right, i thankyou for any help..Andy. ps theres not much in the way of welding forums in australia glad i found this one........
    Last edited by midseries; 04-10-2009 at 05:02 AM. Reason: missed word

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    199

    Default

    will it weld good flat horizontal position? are you going uphill or downhill? are you keeping the rod pushed in tight into the weld? have you tryed lowering the temperature?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    melbourne australia
    Posts
    16

    Default vertical up

    i'm going uphill mate, using 6013 rods...........

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Hazelwood Mo USA
    Posts
    462

    Default

    I used 6010 or 6011 for vertical up or in the old days, Lincoln 5P. Vertical up is a series of downhill welds done in an N configuration or a U configuration. I was never good with 7018 vertical, which is what a lot of guys use for a cap.
    It takes a lot of practice to get good at it. Get the puddle going but not too hot then whip the rod up to let it cool a bit then down to the puddle again for a second then up again and let it cool a bit while working the puddle in an upward direction.
    I learned by watching a tank fitter run them when I was a starting out.

    There is no substitute for a lot of practice!! This will cause you to develop a "feel" for it, then it gets much easier.
    The rod size helps too, if the material is thinner use a smaller rod size, the 6010 - 11 has a fast freeze puddle that helps in vertical.

    I liked the 3/32 rod for smaller pipes, (2" and down).
    I hope some of this helps you, I am no expert thats for sure........

    mike sr

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    7

    Default

    from one newbie to another:
    hold rod almost perpendicular but angled slightly up 10-15 degrees roughly to the plate. 110A sounds a bit high for a 3/32" rod and too low for a 1/8" rod, if it seems too hot and liquidy bring the heat down to 90A. If it just builds and builds weld and looks like crap try closer to 140A I'm not sure the size of a 3.2mm rod. Use a circular motion as you travel up the plate and watch below the puddle. You will notice the undercut you are creating from side to side from the arc and you will also notice how gravity pulls your puddle down to fill in the undercut. Play with the machine settings you will find that your puddle will become very easy to manipulate and just practise with it. hope this helps, good luck
    Last edited by stevo1988; 04-10-2009 at 03:23 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    2,949

    Default Metric Mate"

    Actually, 110 amps isn't out of the ordinary for a 3.2mm (1/8") 6013, in fact, it's on the "low" end of both AC & DC.

    10 mm plate = .03937" or 25/64" ( a real thick 3/8").

    1.) 6013's are not a deep penetrating rod. Not really designed for vertical up grooves, as it has a rutile-potassium flux. Vertical up fillets, okay, & vertical down grooves.

    2.) your joint(s) should be beveled

    3.) Try a 3.2mm 6011 rod @ 90 amps until you get the hang of it. You can practice both vertical up & down.

    4.) gradually work your way to 90 degrees in progression. flat, 30, 45, 60, then 90, then over to 120 for a little overhead practice.

    5.) When you master that, than you can graduate to 7018's

    Hope this helps

    Dave
    Last edited by davedarragh; 04-10-2009 at 04:19 PM.
    "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Oswego IL
    Posts
    650

    Default Use a 7018 rod

    I would highly recommend using a 7018 rod-2 reasons 7018 is an easier rod to weld with, Also it produces a stronger weld. The easiet way to learn vertical up is to take plates and practice with the plates at 20 degrees, then 40 degrees and so on until the plate is vertical up. Also as as u weld do little circle in counterclock wise motion and point the rod up at about 15 degrees. If you are doing multiple passes with 7018 be sure to remove flux after each pass. Also use a 3/32 rod between 90-110 amps, set the welder at DC+

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    melbourne australia
    Posts
    16

    Default vertical up help

    Thanks to all who took the time to answer my post, i now have a some good ideas to try out, i will spend some practice time at home before i go back to the job, thanks again Andy........

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    2,949

    Default "Verticals, Down Under"

    Hey Andy, what's the time difference? It's 20:20 hrs here in Phoenix.

    Got to get used to "mm" myself. I remember when they poured a lot of freeway work in "Metric Yards." Talk about fits with forms, re-bar, constantly looking through conversion tables. The batch plants had to load special software to calibrate the "weigh hoppers" for metric yards.

    Actually, the proper vernacular is "Cubic Meters."

    Aye, mate!

    Let us know of your progress.

    Dave

    Now it's almost 20:30 hrs MST (we don't change to DST in Az, only the Navajo Nation in NE Az does)
    "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Oahu, Hawaii
    Posts
    2,469

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by popspipes View Post
    Vertical up is a series of downhill welds done in an N configuration or a U configuration.

    I'm not late...
    I'm just on Hawaiian Time

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