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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Deltaville, VA
    Posts
    2,239

    Default

    Clint,

    You're using an inverter machine. That's why I recommend the Lanthanated or Ceriated tungsten. The Sync is a transformer based squarewave machine. The Thoriated tungsten works fine for what Nails is working on.

    Nails,

    As Clint suggested, I suspect you possibly wicked a little of the puddle up on your tungsten. Won't be the first time, won't be the last, especially when welding like you are.

    Your amp setting should be fine. I'm more familiar with the Sync 250 than I am with the 200 but shouldn't be much different. With your foot pedal all the way down, you should get the max amps dialed into the machine. As long as you're able to generate your puddle in 2-3 seconds your max setting is fine. You'll want to back off from there as heat builds in the puddle. Since you've got pulse capability on your sync you could use that to help freeze the puddle, but I think that's opening a whole new bag of tricks. You'll need to play with some similar gauge scrap to get a feel for your own pulse settings and what works for you. The thing you need to keep in mind, you're not doing a structural weld where penetration is all inportant, you're trying to minimize the heat while still maintaining a molten puddle. It's a fine line between the two. As you work at feeding the filler and backing off on the amps you'll hit that sweet spot where you just "know it's right". In doing that vertical fill (firewall) you'll find that you want to use about 25-30% fewer amps than you would if you were filling a hole in material "in position".

    Keep us posted on your progress. Sounds like you're making great headway.

    PS. Sounds like you're now getting things dialed in. If it makes any sense, I'd just say that you want to use your arc to chase that filler around the circumference of the hole.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    near rochester NY
    Posts
    9,881

    Lightbulb

    FWIW there have been several articles about transformers going to using the lanthanated and cerated tungstens. i'll see if i can dig them up, seems i remember it also being in the miller blog section of the web site about increased TIG production rates.
    Last edited by fun4now; 08-28-2007 at 03:07 AM.
    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped

    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
    summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
    JAMES

  3. #23

    Default Tig Welding Sheet Metal

    Quote Originally Posted by nails79 View Post
    hi everyone new to the forums and new to tig. i have a new synchrowave 200 and i am currently attempting to fill the holes in the sheetmetal fire wall in my car. the gauges range from 18-22. i have adjusted the amps from 10 to 35, tried the pulse feature (no luck??), im using 2% tungsten size .040, 1/4"-3/8" cup, argon set at 20psig with 3 second post flow. having a lot of difficulty with burn through. just wondering where i should set the machine up for this size material. am i on the right track?? any tips for a beginner?? i have gotten a decent grip on thicker material 1/8" and thicker. thanks in advance for any advice.
    matt
    I think its great that you are tackling your own body work on your car. When it comes to auto restoration work tig welding has some great advantages. There are some instances where it can be a pain to utilize.

    One thing you may encounter when filling holes is if the metal is double thickness, paint may be actually trapped between the two layers and this could be causing contamination. Paint on the other side of the hole can cause contamination, as it burns off and makes it way out of the hole.

    I would definitely recommend making a patch for the holes you are filling. As HMW mentioned using some .035" wire is a good bet for filler wire. I use a 1/16" tungsten in my water cooled torch, that works good for most sheet metal applications. There are sheet metal plug kits made just for filling holes in sheet metal. These kits have assorted size plugs, if your exact size is not available you can use a step drill to drill up to the right size. The step drill also leave a nice chamfer that deburrs the hole, which makes for a cleaner patch. You can also cut them from sheet for larger holes. Tacking a piece of welding rod to the patch can allow you to hold the patch in place wile you weld. You may need to fusion weld one edge while you hold it in place and then once its tacked use filler rod on the opposite side and then you can finish weld.

    Tig welding has advantages on sheet metal repair. I use it all the time when I install new patch panels and make custom sheet metal parts but there are a few places where MIG welding may actually be more advantageous. Filling holes on your firewall would be best done with a MIG. For 1) its faster. 2) if done properly it will transfer less heat to the panel, so less potential warping. 3) not quite as fussy if there is a bit of paint left. Also MIG welding holes with a copper spoon behind the metal works great, holes up to 1/2" can be filled that way. Any larger I would recommend a patch. .023 wire with argon/co2 works great. I have noticed that the smaller MIG welders work best for this type of work.

    Hope this helps, and good luck with your project.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    near rochester NY
    Posts
    9,881

    Lightbulb

    lots of great info, but i gota add one small part.
    I have noticed that the smaller MIG welders work best for this type of work.

    i had the opportunity to use a MM210 on some 20 gage and it performed as well if not better then my MM135. although you may consider the MM210 as still in the small MIG version.aether way it was an excellent fit for the job. and with both MIGs going at once the job went fast and easy.

    P.S. good to have you with us, welcome to the site. looks like you have lots of great info to share.
    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped

    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
    summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
    JAMES

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Anthem, Az
    Posts
    31

    Default

    I was watching some show on TV and they were filling in various sized holes in auto sheet metal. One method I saw them use on small holes was to take a TIG torch at low amperage and fill the holes with uncoated silicon bronze brazing rod. I havn't tried it myself but it looked pretty easy and blended nice with a light sanding.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    near rochester NY
    Posts
    9,881

    Question

    Shamrock1123
    I was watching some show on TV
    &
    it looked pretty easy

    always end up in the same statement at some point and yet they almost always end up being some of the biggest pains in the ars!!

    i think it looks easy due to the ability to stop the camera and re-shoot as needed.

    has any one tried this ?? being as he was using uncoated rod, would he have had to pre-flux it with a past or powder before adding the rod ?
    i like the powder better then the pre-fluxed rod's. but i never tried it with my TIG, only with O/A torches.
    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped

    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
    summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
    JAMES

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Anthem, Az
    Posts
    31

    Default

    My understanding of the process is you don't need the flux like you do for O/A brazing because of the Argon flow while using the tig torch.

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