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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Vero Beach, fl.
    Posts
    761

    Default wd-40

    I have heard of some old timers using wd-40 to prep the weld area. I could never figure out how it could work, you're supposed to be cleaning out the impurities but wd is a petroleum based product. How do you clean something with oil? Dave
    If necessity is the Mother of Invention, I must be the Father of Desperation!

    John Blewett III 10-22-73 to 8-16-07
    Another racing great gone but not to be forgotten.http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...modified&hl=en

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BWS29128 View Post
    I just freakin LOVE how we get soooo off-topic on these posts. Bert, the green pads you see are "commercial grade" pads that are sold in various thicknesses and sizes. You can also use the "green side" of the standard yellow/green 3M Scotch Brite pads you find in your grocery store. In many cases, when professional welders talk about Scotch Brite pads, they're referring to 3M's Industrial Products line. Green isn't an option, but there are other colors and yes, the colors represent different "grits" or abrasiveness. Here's a link for you to check out:
    http://www.freemansupply.com/ScotchBriteIndustr.htm
    I believe you'll find it enlightening.

    For God's sake, STAY AWAY FROM WD-40 for GTAW welding! WD-40 ignites at about 250 degrees and your torch is a good bit hotter than that (well, several thousand degrees, on par). WD-40 is a grease-based petroleum product.....it's the LAST type of chemical you'd want to introduce into an aluminum weld.

    Do yourself a favor: when cleaning your filler-metal rods or cleaning your base material initially, use a standard green scotchbrite pad. Just go to your local grocery store for now and pick a few up to try. For heavier oxides, like when you go to the marina and see that "white stuff" on 3" 6061-T6 tuna towers, buy and use a wire brush that you use EXCLUSIVELY on aluminum...don't use it for anything else including Stainless. If you get into a situation like I was in last month (that you and I already spoke about), prep your material with a wire brush, use the deoxidizer suggested by the Jackson rep, and then wipe clean with a painter's tack-cloth.

    Remember: aluminum WANTS to oxidize...the oxidation process is going to begin instantaneously after you clean it. Do your cleaning immediately prior to stepping on your pedal or pushing your button.
    Not just any metal brush though, it has to made from aluminum or stainlesss and only use it on alumiunum. I also wouldnt recomend using WD40 got to be right up there with the worst things to use, there ares some commercial cleaners but unless this is a big time project or operation you got going i would stick to the brushs.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Deltaville, VA
    Posts
    2,239

    Default

    Man,

    I just caught that comment about "spraying on a little WD-40".

    Can't imagine how that'd help. Heck, might as well swab the area with axle grease so the cup won't stick to the base metal.

    Different strokes for different folks, I guess.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Camden, SC
    Posts
    156

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HMW View Post
    I've used scotch brite pads and use them some but mostly after its welded. I have some maroon colored ones which is very fine. They leave like a dust behind which is little particles. As simple as it may sound, a stainless steel wire brush works good no matter how much oxidation is on it. I just buy the little wood handle ones, just a couple bucks. Like somebody said I mark them with a sharpie. Also I like the wire brush becuase I can clamp 2 pieces together then wire brush them both at the place your going to weld. The wire gets in the crack very good.
    I agree with you completely except for one side-item, HMW: I do a good bit of work in the maritime industry, where 6061-T6 is really common on stuff like T-Tops and Tuna Towers and bowrails/taffrails. Most of the time, the T-6 has been anodized (sometimes prior to welding!) and the least little bit of a wave at the dock can send your wire brush skating across someone's shiny rail/tube and that tends to pi** owners off like nothing else! I know Bert does a lot of work on boats and is trying to break into that area, which is the reason I was suggesting the ScotchBrite pads. I like the green and the same maroon ones that you like....I usually don't use acetone like Bert's been doing, but probably should...

    Back to the wire-brush issue: I found a "new" style of wire brush today...made by Fourney. It has the standard size head and looks to be about the same amount of wires as my other wood-handled brushes, but all the bristle tips come together in a line no-more-than 1/4" wide........I bought two thinking that they'd be GREAT to try on t-top welds where I didn't want excess scratches in the anodizing. Most of the time green pads will get off the "white crud" on the boats I run into, but every once in a while I run into something stubborn and need more "juice". I've never tried any of the stuff the Jackson rep suggested, but I think I'll ask my LWS if he's got some.

    Clint Baxley
    Baxley Welding Service
    Rembert, SC 29128

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Camden, SC
    Posts
    156

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SundownIII View Post
    Man,

    I just caught that comment about "spraying on a little WD-40".

    Can't imagine how that'd help. Heck, might as well swab the area with axle grease so the cup won't stick to the base metal.

    Different strokes for different folks, I guess.
    Sir (or was that C-U-R, as Col Beckwith used to say...?)
    While you're getting that axle grease from the tread-heads, would you mind running down to the aviators and grabbing me a roll of flight line, please?

    Going back to the WD-40 issue, and it really doesn't deserve a spot in this thread due to the inaccuracy, but I could see maybe using WD-40 as a possible means of loosening up mill scale or ultra-light corrosion/oxidation on carbon steel just prior to hitting it with a wire brush, but then you'd still have to go back and clean the joint with something like acetone or isopropyl prior to hitting it with the juice. But then, that would sorta defeat the purpose of the WD in the first place, right? Also, and this is just a guess because I've never tried it, but I would imagine that due to acetone's and isopropyl's rapid drying, you'd have to use quite a bit of either to cut through WD-40. Since a lot of Bert's questions are geared toward the maritime industry (gee...not like YOU'd know anything about boats, huh?) I think I'd also worry about WD-40 overspray.....oil-based-stuff on a white fiberglass deck mixed with the first 3-footer that rolls across the transom would be Recipe # 1 for a busted butt. And then, WD-40 on a teak-floored cockpit of some of those million-dollar-dreams you deal with would/could mean a butt-whippin' right after the butt-bustin.........unless I miss my guess again... Let's not forget what petro-products do to white vinyl fighting chairs or deck chaise's...ugly brown spots that are impossible to get up with all the green pads and Simple Green in the world....trust me.... 3-in1 on a flapping halyard hoist in 30kts/6' 'ers goes ALL OVER the boat (and does not make for happy Coxswains!!!

    Okay...end of rant.

    Clint Baxley
    Baxley Welding Service
    Rembert, SC 29128

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Deltaville, VA
    Posts
    2,239

    Default

    Clint,

    LMAO

    Got to admit though, I've never tried WD-40 for prepping my tig welds.

    Have used it with a torch to loosen rusted bolts. Not pretty the residue it leaves when ignited by the torch. Scotchbrite, SS brush, acetone about all I've ever used to prep alum. I'll have to try some of that aluminum prep that was mentioned. As you're well aware, some of the repairs are pretty difficult due to the condition of the base metal. Just love some of the manufacturers' who use aluminum swim platform brackets rather than SS.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Oahu, Hawaii
    Posts
    2,469

    Default

    All you guys are awsome, 'special thanks to Clint
    I start the H-power shutdown on Wed, so I won't be able to weld for at LEAST a month. NOW you guys may have some peace and quiet on this board!!!!
    ok...don't cry...I'll make time
    I'm not late...
    I'm just on Hawaiian Time

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Ocean City, Maryland
    Posts
    951

    Default

    BWS29128

    They sound like the little wire brushes I use. Wooden handle about 6" over all length handle and all, and the wire is about 1/4" wide. Your right about messing up other things when your working on stuff, thats one reason I don't do any portable work. Also I hate people watching me work If it can't be brought to me I don't do it. But, theres a good market for portable in the marine business, restauraunts etc. Maybe after I retire [12 more yrs] I might try some. I live in a resort so tons of marina's, hotels, restauraunts etc. Right now it would take up to much time doing the portable thing, Leave it and I'll try to fix it
    Last edited by HMW; 08-21-2007 at 06:48 AM. Reason: spelling
    Scott
    HMW [Heavy Metal welding]

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    near rochester NY
    Posts
    9,881

    Default

    you have mentioned the little tooth brush sized ones before, where do you get them ?? all i have seen is steel no S.Steel ones.
    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped

    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
    summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
    JAMES

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Ocean City, Maryland
    Posts
    951

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fun4now View Post
    you have mentioned the little tooth brush sized ones before, where do you get them ?? all i have seen is steel no S.Steel ones.
    I buy them usually at LWS, but got them from Enco too $1.22 ea Great brushs, cheap and work well because all I want to clean is where I want to weld
    http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?P...PARTPG=INLMK32
    Last edited by HMW; 08-21-2007 at 10:20 AM. Reason: spelling
    Scott
    HMW [Heavy Metal welding]

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