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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    16

    Default

    ah as much as i like welding, one thing i dont enjoy doing is tigging aluminum. I like to do it with mig although dont breath in too many fumes as really not good for ur brain. As far as i know u need to use either a stainless steel brush or a aluminum to gurantee no contamination.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bert View Post
    tig321,
    welcome to the board!!! Thanks for your reply! Lot of good info here, lot of help from everyone Me?...I've only tig welded at school, that was 21/2years ago. Got my 200DX so I can start again! Lot of stuff I learned was for transformer-based machines. Apparently inverter-based machines use different tungstens and sharpen differently. That's why I'm picking everyone's brain
    bert
    Thanks Bert, and I'm in the same boat as you. Thats how I knew you had a 200dx I've been searching questions you've already asked.


    Thanks fun4now, I played with it for a few hours today. It sure has alot of adjustment. I'm sure I'll have many Questions later, good thing I found the right place to go.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ventura, California
    Posts
    102

    Default Dedicated SS brushes

    I have 3 stainless steel brushes to prep metal for welding. One just for mild steel, another just for stainless, and the 3rd for just aluminum. I write with magic marker all over the handle the flavor of metal to be prepared so I won't confuse them. Aluminum is especially susceptible to cross contaimination due to its porous nature.

    If the aluminum is greasy, then give it a good wash first, dry, then hit it good with the brush. If it is not greasy, I like to hit it with some Handi Wipe looking cleaner first. http://www.arc-zone.com/catalog/web_...=9278590_10311

    With TIG, it's just you and the metal; no oxidizer or flux cleaner. This means the metal has to be clean. Sure some contaminants will be zapped by the action of the arc, but some may end up in your weld. Generally you are TIG welding because it is thin material, or an "exotic" metal, and it has to be right.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Batavia, NY
    Posts
    159

    Default

    The best way to remove aluminum oxides are aluminum cleaner (chemical cleaner). Dynaflux makes an okay cleaner that you can buy for about $8 for a pint. The best cleaner is made by a company named Arcal and the product name is WELD-O. It's more expensive than the Dynaflux, but works great. All you do is apply it on the area you want to weld with an acid brush, leave it on for a minute or two and wipe off. All oxides are removed and you are ready to go.
    Rich Ferguson
    Sales Technician
    Jackson Welding Supply Co.
    "Keep America Strong.....Weld It"
    www.jacksonweldingsupply.com

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    toronto,ontario
    Posts
    90

    Default

    i use the finest sanding disks Usually 80 grit and i spray a splash of wd40 on it ,disks have to be new so cross contamination then wipe with a clean cloth and weld immediately so oxidization doesnt reoccour.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    near rochester NY
    Posts
    9,881

    Default

    i would have thought the WD40 would cause a problem. i may just have to give that a try.
    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped

    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
    summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
    JAMES

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ventura, California
    Posts
    102

    Default Does Weld-O affect anodizing?

    Quote Originally Posted by jwsrep View Post
    The best way to remove aluminum oxides are aluminum cleaner (chemical cleaner). Dynaflux makes an okay cleaner that you can buy for about $8 for a pint. The best cleaner is made by a company named Arcal and the product name is WELD-O. It's more expensive than the Dynaflux, but works great. All you do is apply it on the area you want to weld with an acid brush, leave it on for a minute or two and wipe off. All oxides are removed and you are ready to go.
    Hey Rich
    Weld-O sounds like something I would like to try on aluminum.
    Any idea if it adversely affects the surface for anodizing?
    How long does the surface stay oxide free?

    Thank you for sharing your experience with us.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Oahu, Hawaii
    Posts
    2,469

    Default

    those ez-wipes say it's acetone free, and a lot of people here say they use acetone right before they weld! Rich and the rest of you guys, thanks, but that stuff can get expensive for me! I'll think I'll start with the scotchbrite pads and wipe it with the acetone. Then we'll see what I try next
    I'm not late...
    I'm just on Hawaiian Time

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Camden, SC
    Posts
    156

    Exclamation Why Does Everyone ALWAYS Go Off-Topic?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bert View Post
    Hi guys, lot of you mention about using a scotchbrite pad to your aluminum.
    Forgive me for being ignorant, but I'm guessing that's the same round one that goes on the rubber backing pad, onto your grinder or drill? I see red, green and brown ones. Which is best?
    thanks,
    bert
    I just freakin LOVE how we get soooo off-topic on these posts. Bert, the green pads you see are "commercial grade" pads that are sold in various thicknesses and sizes. You can also use the "green side" of the standard yellow/green 3M Scotch Brite pads you find in your grocery store. In many cases, when professional welders talk about Scotch Brite pads, they're referring to 3M's Industrial Products line. Green isn't an option, but there are other colors and yes, the colors represent different "grits" or abrasiveness. Here's a link for you to check out:
    http://www.freemansupply.com/ScotchBriteIndustr.htm
    I believe you'll find it enlightening.

    For God's sake, STAY AWAY FROM WD-40 for GTAW welding! WD-40 ignites at about 250 degrees and your torch is a good bit hotter than that (well, several thousand degrees, on par). WD-40 is a grease-based petroleum product.....it's the LAST type of chemical you'd want to introduce into an aluminum weld.

    Do yourself a favor: when cleaning your filler-metal rods or cleaning your base material initially, use a standard green scotchbrite pad. Just go to your local grocery store for now and pick a few up to try. For heavier oxides, like when you go to the marina and see that "white stuff" on 3" 6061-T6 tuna towers, buy and use a wire brush that you use EXCLUSIVELY on aluminum...don't use it for anything else including Stainless. If you get into a situation like I was in last month (that you and I already spoke about), prep your material with a wire brush, use the deoxidizer suggested by the Jackson rep, and then wipe clean with a painter's tack-cloth.

    Remember: aluminum WANTS to oxidize...the oxidation process is going to begin instantaneously after you clean it. Do your cleaning immediately prior to stepping on your pedal or pushing your button.

    Clint Baxley
    Baxley Welding Service
    Rembert, SC 29128

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Ocean City, Maryland
    Posts
    951

    Default

    I've used scotch brite pads and use them some but mostly after its welded. I have some maroon colored ones which is very fine. They leave like a dust behind which is little particles. As simple as it may sound, a stainless steel wire brush works good no matter how much oxidation is on it. I just buy the little wood handle ones, just a couple bucks. Like somebody said I mark them with a sharpie. Also I like the wire brush becuase I can clamp 2 pieces together then wire brush them both at the place your going to weld. The wire gets in the crack very good.
    Scott
    HMW [Heavy Metal welding]

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