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Thread: Copper welding

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Dubuque, IA
    Posts
    12

    Default Copper welding

    I have a set of capacitators with bad connections. The last resort I can think of is welding 4 copper wire terminals to the top of them. I'm considering different processes to use. Advice would be apprieated. I will enclose a picture of the pre-welding setup tomorrow.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by AWSWELD; 03-18-2009 at 10:27 PM. Reason: Add pictures

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    152

    Default

    Be safer to chuck them and buy new ones

    Cheers

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Try soldering

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Dubuque, IA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jake SS View Post
    Be safer to chuck them and buy new ones

    Cheers

    Haha, yeah but im kind of tight on money

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Lake of the Ozarks MO
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AWSWELD View Post
    Haha, yeah but im kind of tight on money
    I think maybe he was referring to what the high heat associated with welding might do to a component such as that. Like it might explode maybe?
    You might wanna think about that when you're welding on them
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Edmonton, Alberta
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    Default

    Well Caps are DC powered so they'ed likely explode in a spectacular fashion.

    Ever think of drilling and retapping the ends to a larger bolt size?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    PA
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    348

    Default

    Hi AWSWELD,

    Is it possible to remove the top plates from your capacitors?. Hard to tell from the photos, but if the copper connections are the concern and you can take the top plate off, then the repair is easy.

    If the plates with the copper connections are the bad part and they are connected internally to the capacitor, then it gets more complicated.

    There is a jewelry welder which uses a charged capacitor to weld studs to earrings and other similar parts. It is called a Sparkie and uses a charged capacitor to weld two pieces together.

    Ni-cad battery packs are welded together using the same type of capacitive welding technology.
    They weld a metal tab to the top and bottom of each individual battery to make connections.

    Since a ni-cad cell is only 1.2 volts, several are connected in series to make up the desired voltage battery pack is needed for a power tool.

    I saw the welding done at a trade show in Europe many years ago and believe the electrodes were designed so the weld current only passed thru the metal tab and the top of the ni-cad cell. It did not pass thru the battery itself which might have caused an explosion.

    Both of these "solutions" require gaining access to both sides of the connections.

    Good luck and be careful.
    Thermal Arc GTSW400, Airco Heliwelder II, Miller Dynasty 350, Hypertherm 1000, oxy-fuel setup, metal cutting bandsaw, air compressor, drill press, etc.:

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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    152

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Burnt hands View Post
    Hi AWSWELD,

    Is it possible to remove the top plates from your capacitors?. Hard to tell from the photos, but if the copper connections are the concern and you can take the top plate off, then the repair is easy.

    If the plates with the copper connections are the bad part and they are connected internally to the capacitor, then it gets more complicated.

    There is a jewelry welder which uses a charged capacitor to weld studs to earrings and other similar parts. It is called a Sparkie and uses a charged capacitor to weld two pieces together.

    Ni-cad battery packs are welded together using the same type of capacitive welding technology.
    They weld a metal tab to the top and bottom of each individual battery to make connections.

    Since a ni-cad cell is only 1.2 volts, several are connected in series to make up the desired voltage battery pack is needed for a power tool.

    I saw the welding done at a trade show in Europe many years ago and believe the electrodes were designed so the weld current only passed thru the metal tab and the top of the ni-cad cell. It did not pass thru the battery itself which might have caused an explosion.

    Both of these "solutions" require gaining access to both sides of the connections.

    Good luck and be careful.
    AWSWELD & Burnt hands (no wonder)

    Hmmmmmm....... Are you kidding? Like I said before dispose of them safely somewhere and buy some new ones, as there is some nasty stuff inside. They are not that expensive.

    Cheers and may you both live a long life

    Jake

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Dubuque, IA
    Posts
    12

    Default

    Can't remove the plates, as you can see, I had to replace two screws with new one in an attepmt to retap the holes. I wish we had that kind of technology at school though, that would be great.


    Quote Originally Posted by Burnt hands View Post
    Hi AWSWELD,

    Is it possible to remove the top plates from your capacitors?. Hard to tell from the photos, but if the copper connections are the concern and you can take the top plate off, then the repair is easy.

    If the plates with the copper connections are the bad part and they are connected internally to the capacitor, then it gets more complicated.

    There is a jewelry welder which uses a charged capacitor to weld studs to earrings and other similar parts. It is called a Sparkie and uses a charged capacitor to weld two pieces together.

    Ni-cad battery packs are welded together using the same type of capacitive welding technology.
    They weld a metal tab to the top and bottom of each individual battery to make connections.

    Since a ni-cad cell is only 1.2 volts, several are connected in series to make up the desired voltage battery pack is needed for a power tool.

    I saw the welding done at a trade show in Europe many years ago and believe the electrodes were designed so the weld current only passed thru the metal tab and the top of the ni-cad cell. It did not pass thru the battery itself which might have caused an explosion.

    Both of these "solutions" require gaining access to both sides of the connections.

    Good luck and be careful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Dubuque, IA
    Posts
    12

    Default

    I tried retapping them without much luck. I did manage too though but they're still a little loose


    Quote Originally Posted by cruizer View Post
    Well Caps are DC powered so they'ed likely explode in a spectacular fashion.

    Ever think of drilling and retapping the ends to a larger bolt size?

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