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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    673

    Smile

    LA Weld:

    Talking aluminum welding is a lot easier than doing it.

    Thanks for all the answers.
    RETIRED desk jockey.

    Hobby weldor with a little training.

    Craftsman O/A---Flat, Vert, Ovhd, Horz.

    Miller Syncrowave 250.

  2. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Craig in Denver View Post
    LA Weld:

    Talking aluminum welding is a lot easier than doing it.

    Thanks for all the answers.
    I think most are intimidated as the learning curve is greater. It has become second nature over time. I will say that my stack is not as clean as KB or Engloid, as I was exposed to a smoother feed by my Teacher and really had never got the perfect stack. Mine is more like ripples than stacked. I can do it but I have to think about it.

    I have a few customers that request a lower profile with very little height to the bead. I call it the "close call" as it is right there on the cusp of burn threw.
    the bead profile is more on the inside than out when you do a test cut.

    I can say also, I do not know it ALL, I am always learning, and I pick up more keeping an open mind than dictating. I have a lot of years under my belt and will be the first to say I have more to LEARN.

    Fortunately I have good equipment, nice shop and a phone when I weld myself into a CORNER.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Battle Ground WA
    Posts
    179

    Default

    La Weld/Craig and the rest of the gang,

    I too am learning to Tig Aluminum. It amazes me how demanding this process is! Like you La Weld I find I am more of a "rippler" I have yet figured out how to stack consistantly, and when I do I tend to run out of wire to feed and m y restarts mess up the consistancy. Does this have to do with using an inverter versus a transformer machine?? (just wondering or should I say hoping) LOL

    I must say I have melted a lot of filler and burned up a lot of Argon! Congratulations Craig on making the radiator repair!! My first repair was a Snow shovel (hope not to have to use it again this year!!!

    Tim
    Retired Elevator Consrtructor Local 19 IUEC
    AK bush pilot (no longer in AK) too old and no longer bold)
    Chaplain CMA chapter 26
    Dynasty200dx (new and loving it)
    MM-252 (NEW AND LEARNING IT)
    Hypertherm PM-45
    Miller 140 mig 110v
    Vtwin builder

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    673

    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by LA Weld View Post
    I think most are intimidated as the learning curve is greater.
    More like insurmountable. =)
    Quote Originally Posted by LA Weld View Post
    I will say that my stack is not as clean as KB or Engloid, as I was exposed to a smoother feed by my Teacher and really had never got the perfect stack. Mine is more like ripples than stacked. I can do it but I have to think about it.
    With all due respect to KB and Engloid (I think they walk on 'welding' water); I don't care if my welds come out stacked or rippled, just as long as their cross section is consistant and they LOOK consistant. Sometimes dipping works, sometimes laywire works. And other times, nothing works.

    Quote Originally Posted by LA Weld View Post
    I have a few customers that request a lower profile with very little height to the bead. I call it the "close call" as it is right there on the cusp of burn threw.
    the bead profile is more on the inside than out when you do a test cut.
    The very thought of this, makes me sweat!

    Quote Originally Posted by LA Weld View Post
    I can say also, I do not know it ALL, I am always learning, and I pick up more keeping an open mind than dictating. I have a lot of years under my belt and will be the first to say I have more to LEARN.
    It's this thought process that keeps me in school.

    Quote Originally Posted by LA Weld View Post
    Fortunately I have a phone when I weld myself into a CORNER.
    I'm outta smilies, so "snicker".

    Quote Originally Posted by Ultrachop View Post
    La Weld/Craig and the rest of the gang,

    I too am learning to Tig Aluminum. It amazes me how demanding this process is!
    It's why alum is my cocaine. :P
    Quote Originally Posted by Ultrachop View Post
    Like you La Weld I find I am more of a "rippler" I have yet figured out how to stack consistantly,
    See my opinion above about ripplin' / stackin'.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ultrachop View Post
    and when I do I tend to run out of wire to feed and my restarts mess up the consistancy.
    I hope you're using 3/32" filler. I STILL don't 'get' 1/16". What I think I've learned about restarts: pull the filler away from the puddle. Do not try to restart. Now, restart the puddle, AND THEN, re-introduce the filler. Restarting the puddle, before re-introducing the filler has worked for me in both mild steel and alum.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ultrachop View Post
    Does this have to do with using an inverter versus a transformer machine?? (just wondering or should I say hoping) LOL
    Like I said, awhile back, since you can't do this left handed, just as well send me that Dynasty.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ultrachop View Post
    I must say I have melted a lot of filler and burned up a lot of Argon!
    The cost of argon is worth my class tuition.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ultrachop View Post
    Congratulations Craig on making the radiator repair!!
    After I plugged the nipple (first weld), I took the piece into my instructor to ask about the fusion between my bead and the base metal. He said it looked good and pointed out a pinhole. I said that I saw it and would catch it with my second, outer bead. Which I did. The only problem was: the instructor thought that I only needed to fix the pinhole. The outer bead was NO WHERE as pretty as the first and he told me so. =( But he hadn't see the lengthwise cracks, which would have propogated back to the surface. It's a good thing I'm THICK skinnned.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ultrachop View Post
    My first repair was a Snow shovel (hope not to have to use it again this year!!!

    Tim
    I'm still using a snow shovel I fixed when I was learning O/A (steel repair on the shank), even after I drove over it with the Bronco. =(
    RETIRED desk jockey.

    Hobby weldor with a little training.

    Craftsman O/A---Flat, Vert, Ovhd, Horz.

    Miller Syncrowave 250.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Battle Ground WA
    Posts
    179

    Default

    Craig,

    I hope us "ole" guys don't cause the youngen's to loose hope thinking they will be as old as us and still can't weld!! In truth with the help of a newly aquired friend that is a retired boilermaker/pipe welder I am gaining confidence daily! funny yesterday I ran a bunch of SS and he said they would no problem pass cert test (great encouragent to say the least) I then did some Mig beads (on your 252) that I haven't found a suitable box to ship it in) then ran a 1/8" fillet weld on AL and darned if it didn't look too bad!! (there is a God) and he held the torch today)

    I will post a few progress photos as soon as I set up some "fresh coupons"

    As for Gas $$$ I am just about to have to refill my 330cf as I am down to 500lbs!@!

    Tim
    Retired Elevator Consrtructor Local 19 IUEC
    AK bush pilot (no longer in AK) too old and no longer bold)
    Chaplain CMA chapter 26
    Dynasty200dx (new and loving it)
    MM-252 (NEW AND LEARNING IT)
    Hypertherm PM-45
    Miller 140 mig 110v
    Vtwin builder

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Eastern North Carolina
    Posts
    13

    Default

    However I personally think any Yamaha or Honda should be scrapped anyway

    I'll agree with you on the honda they arent worth a **** but I wouldn't use any motor but a yamaha. Not trying to offend you just curious to your reasons for the dislike of yamaha. I trust my life to them on my offshore rig we run 60 plus miles out. I have also had the mercury outboard which caught on fire 18 miles offshore. My duck duck hunting rig and small privateer center con also run yamaha and they are abuse to say the least.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Eastern North Carolina
    Posts
    13

    Default

    However I personally think any Yamaha or Honda should be scrapped anyway

    I'll agree with you on the honda they arent worth a darn but I wouldn't use any motor but a yamaha. Not trying to offend you just curious to your reasons for the dislike of yamaha. I trust my life to them on my offshore rig we run 60 plus miles out. I have also had the mercury outboard which caught on fire 18 miles offshore. My duck duck hunting rig and small privateer center con also run yamaha and they are abuse to say the least.

    Why didn't my quote go inside the nice little blue box

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    wisconsin
    Posts
    836

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Agcadmin1 View Post
    However I personally think any Yamaha or Honda should be scrapped anyway

    I'll agree with you on the honda they arent worth a darn but I wouldn't use any motor but a yamaha. Not trying to offend you just curious to your reasons for the dislike of yamaha. I trust my life to them on my offshore rig we run 60 plus miles out. I have also had the mercury outboard which caught on fire 18 miles offshore. My duck duck hunting rig and small privateer center con also run yamaha and they are abuse to say the least.

    Why didn't my quote go inside the nice little blue box
    You didnt leave the command code. ( [/QUOTE] etc.).
    Anyway back to the outboards, the history of outboards is kind of interesting. How all the companies were connected, the business aggreements etc. Anyway the basis on my feelings towards yamaha is primarily from my experience when the company I work for bought their engines or powerheads. The alloys used in the castings arent nealy as good as others, the basic engine design is more automotive and lacks durability. The gearcases are probably the worst for durability. I really cant tell you specifics...not that I dont know, I just cant tell. BTW what merc was it that "caught fire"? What model and how long ago?
    "Better Metalworking Through Research"

    Miller Dynasty 300DX
    Miller Dynasty 200DX
    Miller Spectrum 375 extreme
    Miller Millermatic Passport

    Miller Spot Welder
    Motor-Guard stud welder

    Smith, Meco, Oxweld , Cronatron, Harris, Victor, National, Prest-o-weld, Prest-o-lite, Marquette, Century Aircraft, Craftsman, Goss, Uniweld, Purox, Linde, Eutectic, and Dillon welding torches from 1909 to Present. (58 total)

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Lake of the Ozarks MO
    Posts
    3,553

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Agcadmin1 View Post
    However I personally think any Yamaha or Honda should be scrapped anyway

    I'll agree with you on the honda they arent worth a darn but I wouldn't use any motor but a yamaha. Not trying to offend you just curious to your reasons for the dislike of yamaha. I trust my life to them on my offshore rig we run 60 plus miles out. I have also had the mercury outboard which caught on fire 18 miles offshore. My duck duck hunting rig and small privateer center con also run yamaha and they are abuse to say the least.

    Why didn't my quote go inside the nice little blue box


    Well knocking Yamaha and putting Mercury on a pedestal is sorta tongue in cheek anyhow when you consider how much old Merc outboard stuff was made by Yamaha in the first place. I'm sure Aaron knew this and was just trying to get a rise out of everyone.
    As for Yamaha I just hate their dealership program and the outrageous cost of their parts. I'm more of an Evinrude lover myself and am growing fonder of Suzuki.
    As for weldability.....they all weld fine. I think the old Evinrude/Johnsons have the worst castings of anyone tho hands down! (lots of voids)

    BTW, LA Weld, how much gap did you leave between your pieces? I usually go with somewhere around 1/4 to 3/16ths.

    www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
    Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
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  10. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    wisconsin
    Posts
    836

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FusionKing View Post
    Well knocking Yamaha and putting Mercury on a pedestal is sorta tongue in cheek anyhow when you consider how much old Merc outboard stuff was made by Yamaha in the first place. I'm sure Aaron knew this and was just trying to get a rise out of everyone.
    As for Yamaha I just hate their dealership program and the outrageous cost of their parts. I'm more of an Evinrude lover myself and am growing fonder of Suzuki.
    As for weldability.....they all weld fine. I think the old Evinrude/Johnsons have the worst castings of anyone tho hands down! (lots of voids)

    BTW, LA Weld, how much gap did you leave between your pieces? I usually go with somewhere around 1/4 to 3/16ths.

    FK,
    The only engines merc bought from yamaha were the early 9.9/15 , early 115 and early 225. In fact the 9.9/15 was a joint venture, with the powerheads actually built by merc FOR yamaha. There is more to the story then anyone outside of the companies knows. Anyway this is getting off topic
    "Better Metalworking Through Research"

    Miller Dynasty 300DX
    Miller Dynasty 200DX
    Miller Spectrum 375 extreme
    Miller Millermatic Passport

    Miller Spot Welder
    Motor-Guard stud welder

    Smith, Meco, Oxweld , Cronatron, Harris, Victor, National, Prest-o-weld, Prest-o-lite, Marquette, Century Aircraft, Craftsman, Goss, Uniweld, Purox, Linde, Eutectic, and Dillon welding torches from 1909 to Present. (58 total)

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