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Thread: Bleeding TIG

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Central Fla.
    Posts
    311

    Default Bleeding TIG

    I was taught, and have done as normal procedure, to bleed my lines and regulators after using my o/a kit. This apparently takes pressure off the valves, lines, and regulators.

    Do you (group) do this with your Ar. on your TIG machines? I've done it and not done it. Would like to know if there is an advantage either way.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Vero Beach, fl.
    Posts
    761

    Default advantages?

    I would think it is a good idea to bleed the lines for the occasional user but if you run your stuff off and on all day long it would eat up a lot of gas. Me personally, I don't do it unless I'm disconnecting the hoses and regulator for transport. Dave
    If necessity is the Mother of Invention, I must be the Father of Desperation!

    John Blewett III 10-22-73 to 8-16-07
    Another racing great gone but not to be forgotten.http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...modified&hl=en

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    732

    Default

    I THINK as in not sure that O/A regulators are the only ones needing bleeding and that is because they are diaphragm pressure regulators and the one on a Argon or CO2 shielding gas cylinder are flow regulators.

    A diaphragm regulator wants the pressure relieved when not in use so the "T" handle don't come bursting out when the diaphragm beaks.
    TJ
    TJ______________________________________

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    ****inson ND
    Posts
    557

    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by Fat-Fab.com View Post
    I THINK as in not sure that O/A regulators are the only ones needing bleeding and that is because they are diaphragm pressure regulators and the one on a Argon or CO2 shielding gas cylinder are flow regulators.

    A diaphragm regulator wants the pressure relieved when not in use so the "T" handle don't come bursting out when the diaphragm beaks.
    TJ
    The inert gas regs. that have the ball in a tube style flow meter are generaly of a diaphram style set at a pre set working pressure, but I'm not sure what the ones with a CFH gauge are. I always just make it a habit to purge the regs. at the end of the day just to stay on the safe side. I've noticed that it does seem to prolong there life some what.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    100

    Default

    I was taught from the Victor torch educator guy, for lack of a better name, that you should bleed off your O/A tanks not only to save the diaphrams, but also because over a period of time the gasses mixed in the torch can become unstable. Sounds crazy, but he showed us photos of blowed up torches.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ventura, California
    Posts
    102

    Default Purge at the end of the day

    I was taught to close the tank valve and purge the Argon lines, at the end of the day. This no only relieves pressure on the system, but if there is a slow leak somewhere you won't slowly lose Argon all night long.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Central Fla.
    Posts
    311

    Default Thanks

    Thanks for the answers guys. You've confirmed my suspicions. It is sometimes several days between my TIG use and it makes perfect sense to purge the lines. Like I said, I have done so in the past except for a couple of times when I got lazy or shut the power off and disconnected before realizing I hadn't cleared the lines.

    I shall make this part of my shutdown procedure and form the habit. The minimal loss of gas when purging isn't as important as protecting my equipment.

    Also, Sumarai Dave, your comment about a leak is a very good point. I would be very unhappy to come into the shop one morning and find that I didn't have any Ar. even though I leak test my connections at least once a month. Murphy's Law is still in effect. However, this should only happen if I totally forgot to close my tank valve. Not likely, but possible.

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