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Thread: Granite Island

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    712

    Default Granite Island

    I need to know your opinion. Would 2" 14 GA box tubing be sufficient to support a 44" piece of granite for a kitchen island? The island will be fully supported similar to the structure of a welding table. Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks,
    Nick
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    Last edited by kiwi; 02-02-2009 at 12:30 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Abilene, Texas
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    Default

    I wouldn't hesitate. The attached pic is a conference table that I built the frame for. It's 2x2x14 ga for the top frame and legs and 1.5x1.5x14 ga for the lower support. The top frame also has 2 pieces that run across the short way to support the granite. That granite top is about 4 ft x 6 ft. The table is rock steady. The table is located in the granite seller's showroom. BTW, the blue chairs have been replaced.
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    Last edited by Jim-TX; 02-02-2009 at 12:29 PM.
    Jim

  3. #3
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    Aug 2007
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim-TX View Post
    I wouldn't hesitate. The attached pic is a conference table that I built the frame for. It's 2x2x14 ga for the top frame and legs and 1.5x1.5x14 ga for the lower support. The top frame also has 2 pieces that run across the short way to support the granite. That granite top is about 4 ft x 6 ft. The table is rock steady. The table is located in the granite seller's showroom. BTW, the blue chairs have been replaced.
    Thanks Jim....WOW that was fast!!

  4. #4
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    Aug 2007
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    Default

    Very nice work I might add!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
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    Milan Michigan
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    Default

    I think that would give you a good sturdy surface, No problem as long as you have good welds.

    My back ground is 20 years of doing this type of work, building and designing things.

    I would however design some leveling pads that screw into the bottom of the legs to keep it from wobbling.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Portable Welder View Post
    I think that would give you a good sturdy surface, No problem as long as you have good welds.

    My back ground is 20 years of doing this type of work, building and designing things.

    I would however design some leveling pads that screw into the bottom of the legs to keep it from wobbling.
    Portable Welder (or anyone else): On this kind of box frame design, what methods do you use to get the legs parallel and cross members perpendicular to one another? Also, when tacking a leg to the cross members how do you keep a tack weld on one side from pulling (tilting) the leg when the weld cools? Any tips would be appreciated.
    MTBob
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    835

    Default

    Put diagonals on it to prevent racking. Otherwise, a failure mode like this may happen...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sEaqfpqLBK4

    Without diagonals, you are relying on every conection to be a moment connection, and this makes the welds between legs and the top horizontals a critical weld.

    Addition of one diagonal in each plane defines a rigid shape relying only on pinned connections.

    In the video above, the structure racked just a little bit from the impact and this overloaded every connection because they were not moment connections. Scale that down and imagine hitting your counter with a hand truck or maybe during a "heated family scuffle."

    Here's another failure due to lack of diagonal bracing or moment connections (you've got to have at least one)...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tAOVkKWNfdo
    Last edited by Bodybagger; 02-03-2009 at 01:33 AM.
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  8. #8
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    Milan Michigan
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    Default

    Theres nothing complicated about this, Use a flat table and a square no other braces needed unless for temporary use.

    Just tack the unit together and keep checking things.

    The bottom of the legs will warp in slightly maybe an 1/8" at most.

    Use a bottle jack to spread them back out if its that criticle.

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