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Thread: bert/tig kit

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Oahu, Hawaii
    Posts
    2,469

    Default bert/tig kit

    Hi guys and girls
    Went back and got the contractor's kit for my Dynasty 200DX. Later I'll get the water-cooled torch and the coolmate 3 (when $ allows)... They ran out of the 5356 rods, so I got the 4043 rods at 1/16 and 3/32. Tungsten is 3/32 ceriated/orange band (expensive!) Gonna practice with some 1/8" aluminum and see how it goes. I was gonna try cfm @20-25.
    Any advice/tips?
    thanks a lot
    bert
    I'm not late...
    I'm just on Hawaiian Time

  2. #2
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    Mar 2007
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    Default

    Oh, I have some 3/32" aluminum sheet I'm gonna cut coupons out of and start practicing with those...Any tips on gas flow (using 100% argon) or anything else, let me know!
    thanks,
    bert
    I'm not late...
    I'm just on Hawaiian Time

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Vero Beach, fl.
    Posts
    761

    Default Any advice/tips?

    Bert, my best advice would be for you to send your new toys here to me, you know, so I can check them out for you and make sure they are working proper like,and then I will send you back some pictures of how it should be done.
    Dave
    If necessity is the Mother of Invention, I must be the Father of Desperation!

    John Blewett III 10-22-73 to 8-16-07
    Another racing great gone but not to be forgotten.http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...modified&hl=en

  4. #4
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    Mar 2007
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    Default Deliver to you now!

    well, with your experience, I might just do that!!!
    NOT!!!
    I'm not late...
    I'm just on Hawaiian Time

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ventura, California
    Posts
    102

    Talking Gas pressure & tungstens

    Quote Originally Posted by Bert View Post
    Hi guys and girls
    Went back and got the contractor's kit for my Dynasty 200DX. Later I'll get the water-cooled torch and the coolmate 3 (when $ allows)... They ran out of the 5356 rods, so I got the 4043 rods at 1/16 and 3/32. Tungsten is 3/32 ceriated/orange band (expensive!) Gonna practice with some 1/8" aluminum and see how it goes. I was gonna try cfm @20-25.
    Any advice/tips?
    thanks a lot
    bert
    I like to run closer to 20 psi on the flowmeter. If the pressure is too high it will create turbulance and actually pull oxygen into the arc, which is bad for business.

    Speaking of turbulance reduction, I also recommend using a gas lens. It has a similar function to the areator in a faucet. If you ever remove an areator and turn on the water you see how random the flow is. After replacing the areator the water flows out in a nice steady column. This is exactly what a gas lens does with the gas flow around your TIG arc.

    If you are going to weld thin material, you might want to consider going with 1/16 tungsten electrodes (or smaller). Try to get away with as small a tunsgten as possible, to keep the arc small and focused as possible.

    When it comes to flavors of tungsten, like sports teams, everyone seems to find one they like over others. My advice is to try different ones on different metals. I avoid Thoriated due to its radioactive nature. (Sharpening puts it in the air, as does vaporizing during an arc, which can go in the lungs. No thanks.) After my own "experiments", I found that Zirconiated works best (for me) on Aluminum. The arc stays clear and the bead is consistent. For mild steel and stainless I like Lanthinated. However, I have heard that tungstens behave differently on an inverter machine (like your Dynasty) vs. one of the old school transformer rigs like they run at my welding class at college. Again, try different ones and see how they work for YOU on YOUR machine.

    As you know, you generally have to purchase electrodes by the box of 10. I found a company that will send FREE samples of various types and sizes of tungsten.
    http://www.diamondground.com/freesample.html
    It helped me in my experiments without the need to buy a whole box. Just know that a salesguy will call to see how the tungsten worked for you, and to see if you want to order more. As long as you are polite, they will send more free samples. Sure beats spending $30+ for a box for each flavor of tungsten as an experiment.

    Holding the TIG rod is half the battle, since the rod needs to be at the right place at the right time. Training your hand to feed the rod takes lots of practice and time. I found a way to "cheat". I use a "TIG Pen" to hold the rod.
    http://store.weldingdepot.com/cgi/we...t/TP1550a.html
    Some guys thing it is a gimic or lazy, but I LOVE it. It is especially useful when welding aluminum since the stuff melts like butter and the rod needs to be feed at a high rate, constently.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Camden, SC
    Posts
    156

    Thumbs up

    Bert,
    If you're welding inside where wind or fans aren't a problem, you might be able to get your Argon flow down to 15cfm...this could save you $$$ in the long run. When I'm outside I'll run as high as 25, but only rarely (I've found that if I need to run 25cfm, it's better to just wait til the wind dies down...otherwise your welds end up looking like doo-doo.). Yesterday I ran my Ar at 10cfm for a while just to see how it would work with my new WC9FV torch with gas lens setup...it worked okay but I liked the flow of my puddle better when I went back up to 15 (I was working in a covered-but-open carport with zero wind speed).

    Unless you're going to work on super-thin sheet, I'd stick with 3/32" tungsten and a 9-series torch. Go ahead and spring for the gas lens setup as soon as you can afford to spend $15 to $20 for the different parts (you can actually get one cup, one collet, and one diffuser for under $10 but I'd recommend getting several different size cups while you're at your LWS).

    Maybe, if you're nice, you can post some pictures of your trial work and (politely!) ask SundownIII to critique them for you.

    Clint Baxley
    Baxley Welding Service
    Rembert, SC 29128

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Camden, SC
    Posts
    156

    Thumbs up Also...As Far As Filler Rod Size Goes:

    Bert,
    Stick with your 1/16" filler rods to begin with...unless you're planning on filling in holes, your 1/16" 4043 filler will do everything you want for now. Definitely pick up some 1/16" 5356 filler when your LWS gets it in stock.
    ~Clint

    Clint Baxley
    Baxley Welding Service
    Rembert, SC 29128

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    near rochester NY
    Posts
    9,881

    Default

    sounds like you have it going ok. i would recommend you try out 2% lanthanated when you go to get some new tung. though. of have diamond ground send you out a few free samples. i found the 2% to hold its point much better.
    as for the tip grind it to a point at about 30% and then put a small flat spot on the end.(see pic)
    also don't get all freaked out trying to use all the controls on the dyn. stick to the basics wile learning. you can add pules and mess with the frequency later to see how you like the effects when you can tell the difference.
    keep the puddle as hot as you can without blowing threw and add your filler to the leading edge of the puddle at about a 15% angel. also you will find aluminum needs more filler than steel so go ahead and push some rod in there instead of just a little dab. i found working on the vertical to really help me see the puddle and how its acting as well as how the torch pulls it around.
    don't get frustrated, if its getting to you stop and do some thing else for a wile and come back to it. you are not likely to learn anything when you are pizzed off at it. you might try running a few beads across the top without separate pieces to just see how every thing moves. so don't worry about joining 2 pieces right away, just play on the top of one for a little bit to see how every thing feels and act's.
    when you do start trying to join 2 pieces, i found you have to get the filler in there fast. when you start the puddle on the 2 pieces will try to pull away from each other like to magnets pushing. so get it started and add a little filler as soon as you see the puddle forming, the filler will bridge the gap and join the 2 puddles together. after that its all purity much the same as running a bead on the top, except you need more filler.
    a SS wire brush is a bit must have. use it just before you start the bead. aluminum reforms its oxide layer right away so you have to hit it just before you weld. don't try brushing all the coupons or pieces ahead of time then sit down to weld all day. i have a 3.5" SS wire cup brush i use just before welding, not with the grinder but by hand. its got a lot of small closely spaced bristles that do a great job for last minuit clean up. if you do use some thing like that on a 4.5" grinder be careful it will take the aluminum off fast. so be careful not to remove too much. if you can find it a small SS toothbrush type would also be nice.
    just remember it has to be SS and never use it for amy thing but aluminum. keep all your aluminum cleaning and cutting tools separate from the ones used for steel.
    i also found that using wax when cutting of using a sanding flap disk to really help. bee's wax is recommended but you can steel one of the wife's candles if ya need to, just don't let her catch ya.
    also find a small project you can do. i built an aluminum cart for my welder. just doing coupons will get old fast and is not going to teach you as much as having to work on something that wont lay flat for you. it will also give you a bigger gaol to reach, some thing you can see results from. yes i put down a few bad beads on my cart, even had to grind out and replace some pieces. but in the end i got several things out of it i would never have gotten from doing coupons.
    i got a cart for one, but i also got practice welding in all sorts of positions. standing, sitting, bending over, twisting threw, even a few upside down. also got some practice fixing stuff and finding ways to prevent recurrences of those problems. and when it was all done i had a great scenes of pride in having made a great cart.


    take this advice with the knowledge i am still new to TIG so it may not be the answer for you but worked well for me. some of it may also be stuff you already know.
    i hope some of it may be of some help to ya though.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped

    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
    summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
    JAMES

  9. #9

    Default

    Bert:

    The small (toothbrush sized) stainless steel scratch brushes that James mentioned. W. W. Grainger. Item No. 3A336 and 3A337. Small SS scratch brushes. 3A336 is a curved wood handle in a five brush package. 3A337 is plastic handle in a five brush package. I prefer the wood handle for obvious reasons - hot aluminum melts plastic. They work really well for getting down right into the area of the weld bead just prior to starting.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Deltaville, VA
    Posts
    2,239

    Default

    Bert,

    You've gotten some good advice here, consequently I didn't chime in. I personally have had good luck with the 2% Lanthanated tungstens with the inverter machines. As Clint said, you will like the gas lens.

    Once you get past the basic "coupon" stage, you may want to practice welding aluminum pipe to your coupons. If you have any marine fabricators nearby, you can probably pick up a handfull of cutoffs for nothing. (Heck, if you were closer, I'd give you a box to play with). Doing this will help with torch manipulation and get you used to working "out of position".

    Clint,

    Glad to hear you like the gas lens. Do appreciate the comments but think you may overestimate my expertise. I just happen to have a good deal of experience in the field you're working in (marine fabrication). I've had the good fortune to be around some of the best in the business, but, as I said before, I don't put myself in their league. We've got a few guys on this board (KB, Engloid, etc) whose expertise far exceeds my own. I've found them to be a great source of information.

    That's what makes this board great. Experienced people willing to share their experience with those on their way up the learning curve. Just a shame that we have to wade through so much BS and bad information at times to get to the "good stuff".

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