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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    9

    Default Brazing with GTAW (TIG) equipmnet

    Folks:

    I briefly touched upon this topic on my previous posting, but it was not in
    the title.

    I would like to do brazing using TIG equipment instead of having to use
    a torch.

    I don't want to use a torch because I do not want to have to deal with
    tanks of oxygen and flammable gasses. Having a tank of nitrogen or other
    inert gas is okay.

    I was told that it is possible to get decent brazes using TIG equipment as long
    as I use an inert gas such as nitrogen for the gas shield. Using an inert gas
    for the shield could elminate the need for a flux.

    I plan to braze dissimilar metals (aluminum to steel or to brass) for artwork
    and jewelry. Nothing structural or requiring inspection and certification. I anticipate using metals up to about 1/8th or 3/16th inch thick maximum; most
    thinner (1/32nd to 1/16th).

    I am looking at the Dynasty series which can go down to about 1 amp.

    Have any of you any experience brazing with TIG equipment instead of using
    torches?

    Thank you

    Mark Allyn
    Portland, Oregon

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    wisconsin
    Posts
    836

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by markallyn View Post
    Folks:

    I briefly touched upon this topic on my previous posting, but it was not in
    the title.

    I would like to do brazing using TIG equipment instead of having to use
    a torch.

    I don't want to use a torch because I do not want to have to deal with
    tanks of oxygen and flammable gasses. Having a tank of nitrogen or other
    inert gas is okay.

    I was told that it is possible to get decent brazes using TIG equipment as long
    as I use an inert gas such as nitrogen for the gas shield. Using an inert gas
    for the shield could elminate the need for a flux.

    I plan to braze dissimilar metals (aluminum to steel or to brass) for artwork
    and jewelry. Nothing structural or requiring inspection and certification. I anticipate using metals up to about 1/8th or 3/16th inch thick maximum; most
    thinner (1/32nd to 1/16th).

    I am looking at the Dynasty series which can go down to about 1 amp.

    Have any of you any experience brazing with TIG equipment instead of using
    torches?

    Thank you

    Mark Allyn
    Portland, Oregon
    Hi Mark,
    Yes you can braze with a tig torch, its nothing special just a different heat source. Shielding gas is typically pure Argon. You may still want the flux as its for cleaning the base material more then anything to do with the filler. Heck you can torch braze without flux if everything is clean. There are some downsides to using the tig though.

    1-Easy to boil the filler due to high local heat imput
    2-Cant sweat joints together as easily
    3-flux residue can foul the tungsten and cups
    4-Heat control is not as directional

    You want to join aluminum to steel? I believe some of the flea-market rods ( high zinc) will "stick" to both, and since your doing artsy work strength isnt an issue. As far as I know there are only a handful of people in the world that braze aluminum to steel by hand for strength using the multi-step process.

    I have 2 of the dynastys, they are tops, but im curious as to why you are affraid of the torch? As far as I know the torch is more capable and flexible.
    The gasses are nothing to be affraid of, have been around for over 100 years in basicly the same format.

    -Aaron
    "Better Metalworking Through Research"

    Miller Dynasty 300DX
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    Smith, Meco, Oxweld , Cronatron, Harris, Victor, National, Prest-o-weld, Prest-o-lite, Marquette, Century Aircraft, Craftsman, Goss, Uniweld, Purox, Linde, Eutectic, and Dillon welding torches from 1909 to Present. (58 total)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    ****inson ND
    Posts
    557

    Talking

    Nitrogen is not inert. Only argon and helium are completly inert. There are other fuel gases that are alot safer and cleaner than accetylene if this is an issue for you. Propane, MAPP gas, propylene, hydrogen, etc....
    The only time accetylene is absolutly nessicary is when fusion welding metals, other than that all the other gases will pre-heat, braze, and cut ferrous metals. The only reason accetylene is required for welding is because out of the 2 gases that get a hot enough flame (accetylene, propylene) it's the only one that doesn't effect the base metal at the nesisary temp. for welding. Propylene produces a small amount of moister as it burns wich is detrimental to welding but fine for brazing. For your aplication I'd recomend prapane. It's clean, eficiant, and cheap. Also you can get gas cylinders in many different sizes from realy small (aproximatly 5 pounds) to realy large (as large as you want).

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