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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Carson City, Nevada
    Posts
    32

    Default Using Sharp Arc on 350MPa

    The details. Pulse miging on aluminum 6061. Machine is a 350MPa with XR control. Material is sq tubing .125 wall inside and outside corners & butt joints. 3/16 flat strap with long outside joints from flat to 20*. How does the Sharp Arc setting change the weld bead? This adjusts from 0 to 50 on the dial.
    Kevin
    [XMT 350MPa , XR Feeder & Aluma Pro gun , Dynasty 200DX]

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KKM View Post
    The details. Pulse miging on aluminum 6061. Machine is a 350MPa with XR control. Material is sq tubing .125 wall inside and outside corners & butt joints. 3/16 flat strap with long outside joints from flat to 20*. How does the Sharp Arc setting change the weld bead? This adjusts from 0 to 50 on the dial.
    Kevin
    Well, I'm not sure, but you've got the machine so why not run a few beads on various settings and tell us what the results are...

    I think it has to do with the shape of your bead, flatter wider bead versus raised bead, with more contour to it. But that is just a guess. I used that machine once and if I remember correct that's what it did.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    3,711

    Default

    KKM,

    The Sharp Arc changes the shape of the arc cone and is typically used to compensate as shielding gas mixtures vary. A low setting of 0 gives a wide and very fluid arc cone for a flat weld bead profile. Turning the dial up toward 50 gives a less fluid "sharper" more narrow bead profile. Thus the term "Sharp Arc".

    I hope this helps.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Carson City, Nevada
    Posts
    32

    Default

    Is Sharp Arc used or it it usefull for different types of joints? Flat butt or inside corners. How about flat or vertical joints.
    [XMT 350MPa , XR Feeder & Aluma Pro gun , Dynasty 200DX]

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    3,711

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KKM View Post
    Is Sharp Arc used or it it usefull for different types of joints? Flat butt or inside corners. How about flat or vertical joints.
    KKM,

    The "Sharp Arc" is used in the pulsed GMAW process. It is useful for all joint configurations and welding positions. The "Sharp Arc" can be adjusted for all types of welding and personal preference in the GMAW-PULSED welding process.

    Set the "Sharp Arc" control in the mid to upper range (25-40) for uphill vertical welds. The arc is now less fluid, stiffer, with increased penetration. The dryer puddle also helps control the puddle by virtually eliminating puddle roll out. The weld will be narrower as well. Vertical up welds are typically very strong welds. Therefore, the stiff, hard driving, deeper penetrating arc found from midrange to maximum on the "Sharp Arc" control is ideal for uphill vertical welds.

    When using the GMAW-PULSED process in the flat position a low number between 0 and mid-range (0-20/25) may be selected. The "Sharp Arc" will create a soft fluid puddle with a wide profile and only a small crown. Using this softer arc in the flat or horizontal position yields a wide bead without overkill on the penetration. This is important when fabricating asthetically pleasing weldments where grinding and/or scaling is not an option.

    Inside corners weld nicely on either end of the "Sharp Arc" control range. If using a hard, dry, penetrating arc with a narrow and high crown (25-50) be careful with your HAZ on the material exterior. If not critical, then for asthetics. When using a softer more fluid arc (0-20/25) watch for puddle rollout from the joint. This applies to overhead welds too!

    I have listed the basic arc characteristics and possible uses. The possibilities are nearly endless. Try working with scrap material similar in alloy, size, thickness, surface area, and joint design created from bevels and weldment to be arrangement.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Carson City, Nevada
    Posts
    32

    Default

    Hawk,

    Thank you very much for the lesson. It would be nice if Miller would put out a book with this kind of info. I plan to burn a lot of wire before I start welding on my boat. I am inclosing the flybridge and installing glass windows.
    Kevin
    [XMT 350MPa , XR Feeder & Aluma Pro gun , Dynasty 200DX]

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    3,711

    Default

    KKM,

    You are welcome. Miller does a pretty good job of explaining their machine controls most of the time. I am sorry you could not find what you needed in this case.

    Let me know how you like the MPa after you get some wire time under your belt. I am really looking hard at one myself. I have a 12 RC feeder, but might add the S74 MPa feeder for its synergic capabilities. Send me some pictures of your wire burning practice. Email me if you don't want to put it on the forum.

    Thanks KKM. Maybe you can help Miller sell me a machine. The closest unit I own is an ALT 304. This is an "Auto-Line" predecessor of the XMT 350 CC/CV. It has no pulse capability without an external "OPTIMA" pulse unit.

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