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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    9

    Thumbs up time-sert

    A Heli-coil is really only advisable for a one-time fixed repair. This means the fastener is basically permanent, as opposed to being removed on a regular basis for maintenance or even future repair. I use time-serts exclusively for all thread repairs. This is Ford's recommendation for spark plug thread repair. There is a special kit for this repair.
    Ford has had an issue on their Triton motors with the spark plugs blowing out of the head. This is from repeated removal/thread damage/air-tools/over-torque etc..(I think all aluminum threads with a steel fastener face this outcome eventually.) The repair is professional to say the least. They use an undersized threaded bushing that is seated, and pressed in place...virtually eliminating the possibility of the thread coming out when removing the fastener! http://www.timesert.com/
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  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Omaha, NE
    Posts
    447

    Default

    I must admit i love the Time-serts, i've used them a few times back at the porsche shop. The main reason i say heli-coil is because they are the easiest to find and a bit cheaper when you want to do 5-10 holes. like i said on an aluminum head i prefer to do all the exhaust mani holes and then use studs instead of bolts for the final product. Then i use Jet-Loc nuts most of the time to ensure i'm not tightening the turbo mani every 2 track days or so.
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  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    298

    Default

    Another vote for Timeserts. Many a Porsche case has been improved with them. Just peplacing studs with bigger studs is not that simple in some motors. The studs have to be matched to the rest of the system for even clamping during use. Installing time serts and Racewear studs is part of the improvment plan on Porsche motor cases when used for racing.
    Weekend wannab racer with some welders.

  4. #14

    Default

    Three votes for Timesert.

    I have done quite a few older HD refits and always used Timeserts for the cases and knock on wood no failures. I have also did a alot of spark plug repairs, customers would bring the heads wondering why no more threads in the head. Gotta love Yuppi mechanics. tight and hot always made me money, and we are not talkin their wifes.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Omaha, NE
    Posts
    447

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Vicegrip View Post
    Another vote for Timeserts. Many a Porsche case has been improved with them. Just peplacing studs with bigger studs is not that simple in some motors. The studs have to be matched to the rest of the system for even clamping during use. Installing time serts and Racewear studs is part of the improvment plan on Porsche motor cases when used for racing.
    The two just go hand in hand. You'd almost htink Porshe owned heli-coil if you didn't know any better. Since having to use them on countless porsche engines, i have just come to want to do complete aluminum castings up with heli-coil/time-serts as soon as they're prepped from the machine shop, i thought i was going to be the only one :P
    Dynasty 200DX
    Hobart Handler 135
    Smith MB55A-510 O/A setup
    Lathe/Mill/Bandsaw
    Hypertherm Powermax 45
    Just about every other hand tool you can imagine

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    14

    Default maybe RIVNUTS

    Quote Originally Posted by turboglenn View Post
    I guess i have just had good luck with them the whole timei've used them. Aside from getting a hole drilled crooked when i'm in an odd position doing the work, I haven't had hardley any issues with heli-coils. It sounds like some of you use them in much more rigorouse enviroments than i do though.

    keensert? I'm going to have to google that one. i'm still trying to find the inserts that the japanese motorcycle makers put in their subframes. The tubes are hollow and the inserts look similar to some of the ones on the ez-lok page but none of them that look right are for the application i'm needing. I need something that will slip in a hole in hollow box stock. Even if i have tto tack the edge to keep it from spinning it wouldn't bother me at all. But i havent' found a good insert for hollow aluminum structures yet.
    It is a avaition component but it make work for what you are looking for.

    http://www.hansonrivet.com/w64.htm
    Every question in life has an answer of

    YES OR NO

    Maybe = NO



    Keep life simple and enjoy it!

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wilmington, NC
    Posts
    21

    Default I also love helicoils

    Turboglenn

    I worked for Honeywell space and Avionics in NC as a machining manager. We used Helicoil inserts in everything that went into space, from 15-5PH stainless,6061 Aluminum,7075 aluminum and even titanium. All threads were to be self locking. To my knowledge we never had a failure. The only problem would be with a stainless screw going into the insert which was also stainless, could gaul and we were not allowed to use anything on the threads. I now use them in cast iron engine blocks, intake manifolds and transmission to bell housing bolts with no failure so far. If the correct insert is put into a properly prepared hole there should be no problem with it ever.

    Later

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Lake of the Ozarks MO
    Posts
    3,547

    Default

    Yea but when you say "properly prepared" you say a mouthful
    Mount that block in a mill and go for it and i'll say **** yea!!

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  9. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wilmington, NC
    Posts
    21

    Default

    I don't think that you would go at an expensive block with an electric drill and a hand tap in the first place.
    There are some rules to be followed and Helicoils are a permanent repair. You would need to get the Helicoil guide sheet for the insert that you want to use, this would give you the proper hole diameter, hole depth, minimum tap depth and champer diameter. Most Helicoils fail because they are not 1-1/2 to 2 turns below the surface (more for over 5/16-16) and the hole is too big.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Lake of the Ozarks MO
    Posts
    3,547

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LuckyEddie View Post
    I don't think that you would go at an expensive block with an electric drill and a hand tap in the first place.

    That's exactly how I took it. Re-read post #1 and #10

    www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
    Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
    MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
    Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

    Miller Bobcat 225 NT (what I began my present Biz with!)
    Miller 30-A Spoolgun
    Miller WC-115-A
    Miller Spectrum 300
    Miller 225 Thunderbolt (my first machine bought new 1980)
    SPEEDGLAS 9100XX

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