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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    denver
    Posts
    67

    Default Mig or Tig for auto stuff

    I am a total car guy but a complete welder newbie.

    I am ready to buy a welder and my wifes uncle (pro welder by trade) says get a tig but he is not a car guy.

    I always see guys using mig for most car stuff like body panels unless its trick stuff like intakes.

    The Tig I was looking at is the dyn 200dx. I want something that is not gonna hold me back for the garage mech in me.

    Mig would be a 250 or something that size.


    Can I do anything auto related with tig? I dont mind if its gonna take a little longer if I can do it and it be as strong.

    Also could you just use the stick for body panels or is that totally different from mig as an end result.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Baltimore, Maryland
    Posts
    315

    Default

    Anything that will be seen by a scrupulous I should be TIG welded on a vehicle. Mig is much faster. It is up to you. Both are a must for a car nut to own. I have both.

    James
    Miller Dynasty 200DX SOLD
    WeldTec Water Cooler SOLD
    Miller Millermatic 180 w/ Spoolmate 100
    20Ton press
    And lots of Cut-off and grinding wheels
    www.IAGPERFORMANCE.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Clark County, NV
    Posts
    2,696

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by superdave99gt View Post
    ...I dont mind if its gonna take a little longer...
    Define a "little" longer.

    How thin do you expect to be the thinnest you will have to weld and what kind of joint will that be?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    denver
    Posts
    67

    Default

    James, could you please tell me why I would need both. that is the problem I am having now is where I really need both if I do.

    I cant spend the 3k + for a dyn and then get a mig too and I dont want a machine that im gonna say in 2 yrs I wish I would have got the bigger one.


    Mac, I would say 1/4 would probably be the thickest I would ever weld and it wouldnt be anything structural if that thick.

    Thinnest would be a body panel probably so 1/8".... maybe a 1/16" when I get better.

    Like I said, im a newb welder so a little longer is just what ive heard it adds to tig opposed to mig.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    denver
    Posts
    67

    Default

    Also can you weld suspension stuff with a tig or do I need a mig.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    673

    Default

    I'm a TIG fan. If you can afford the Dynasty 200DX, you'll be set for a long time. It will not hold you back. And it will do thin alum, a MIG will NOT. MIG is faster on mild steel and works very well for panel replacement (LOTS of tack welds). There's no way in Hades that you're going to do body panels with stick. The Dynasty will do anything that needs to be done with stick electrodes, but you can't; because it's really, really hard.

    One thing that you have NO clue. Welding is VERY difficult. You don't just buy ANY welder and start welding. I'm in my third welding class, basic MIG sheet metal, O/A and TIG this time; and I embarrass myself EVERY night ; I started O/A welding in 1977. Welding is a VERY difficult art form, learned over years of experience.

    You need both, a TIG and a high quality MIG. I'd start with the TIG.

    Edit: TIG will do very well on suspension stuff, IF YOU HIRE SOMEONE ELSE TO DO IT.

    Good luck Rookie, maintain your sense of humor; because you're going to need it.

    Welcome to the incredibly complex world of Welding.
    Last edited by Craig in Denver; 09-12-2008 at 09:57 PM.
    RETIRED desk jockey.

    Hobby weldor with a little training.

    Craftsman O/A---Flat, Vert, Ovhd, Horz.

    Miller Syncrowave 250.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    denver
    Posts
    67

    Default

    Thanks Craig, luckily I got the uncle who is an awesome welder. He actually just bought a 350 sync with all the goodies so he will be doing my hardcore stuff.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    180

    Default

    People who own both MIG and TIG that I've known have said that for the home craftsman a good TIG is all that's needed. If I had to to choose, I'd agree. I use TIG 90% of the time, probably because of its versatility and the ease of controlling the process, the appearance and strength of the product. It's just that learning MIG is easier, so most people start with it. If I were starting over and wanted to economize, I'd buy a Miller Dynasty and if I couldn't afford that, a Syncrowave.
    Miller XMT-350 CC/CV
    Miller S-22A wirefeeder
    Bernard 400A "Q" gun
    Miller 30-A Spoolmatic w/WC-24
    CK 210 & WP-18 GTAW torches
    Hypertherm Powermax 30
    O/A Rig, Enco 4x6 bandsaw, etc.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    southwestern ohio
    Posts
    272

    Default

    Tradionaly, I mean 20 years ago, an O/A torch wasused for brazing panels in place, but with todays hss body panels that process is no longer recomended due to essesive work hardening. Then came the mig welder and every thing changed, paels could be welded much faster and much stronger, and that was the standard in all shops for years. Then came the tig welder and thinner panels could be welded easily along with aluminum(migs could do aluminum but it was un- common). For the hobby welder get a mig and you can weld all the bodypanels you need. If you are a pro get both.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Clark County, NV
    Posts
    2,696

    Default

    1/16" steel is no problem for either process, but 1/4" is going to be a lot easier with a MIG unless you have a serious serious machine. Even then, MIG will be a lot easier.

    And I agree that "easier" doesn't mean "easy"

    But 1/16" seems thick for body panels on cars. But I don't work on them. I have welded 24-gauge at the lower limits of my MIG machines with the right wire and gas.

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