Miller Electric

Welding Discussion Forums

Home » Resources » Communities » Welding Discussion Forums
 
Miller Welding Discussion Forums - Powered by vBulletin

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 29
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Santa Clara, Ca
    Posts
    68

    Default Tig Grinding Wheel ???

    I was reading an article that recommended using a 120-150 grit grinding wheel for grinding the tips for my tungstan. Would you guys agree with this? Also I went to Home DumpO and all they had was medium grit wheels , what would a medium grit rate at numbers wise?

    Thanks
    Last edited by Bart; 07-11-2007 at 08:51 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ventura, California
    Posts
    102

    Default Try BOTH 80 + 240 grit

    Its a trade-off. The larger the grit number, the finer the finish on the electrode tip. The finer the finish, the less arc wander, the happier the welder. However, it will take FOREVER to cut the end off and regrind the tip with just a 240 grit. I solved this by using an 80 grit to cut-off and remove the majority of the material to create the tip. Then put a fine finish on the tip with the 240 grit.

    Normally this would require a grinder with 2 wheels. I needed something more portable than a traditional grinder, so I took a cordless Dremel tool and purchased some diamond embedded grinding wheels. I sandwiched a 240 grit wheel on top of an 80 grit wheel and mounted them both on a single mandrel. The 80 grit makes pretty quick work of the cut-off and tip angle. Finishing off with the 240 gives nearly a glass smooth surface.

    During the final finish, be sure to keep the direction of the grind along the length of the electrode (NOT going at right angle to it). The arc will follow the direction of the grind, so keep it going toward the point.

    I got my wheels on eBay for about $5 each, including the mandrel. The Dremel tool is their Lithium cordless model, runs around $80. Its battery holds a charge for a long time. I get about 30 sharpenings before needing to recharge. I keep an extra battery handy.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    near rochester NY
    Posts
    9,881

    Default

    Samurai Dave
    thats a good idea, i might just have to give that a try.
    i been looking at 6" D-wheels for a bench grinder to dedicate to tungsten, but they are prity expensve.
    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped

    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
    summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
    JAMES

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    collinsville, ok
    Posts
    86

    Default

    i guess i'm a bit crude
    i just chuck my tungstan up in a cordless drill and sharpen it on my angle grinder. i guess it ain't perfect but, i havent failed but one tig x-ray.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Santa Clara, Ca
    Posts
    68

    Default

    [QUOTE=
    During the final finish, be sure to keep the direction of the grind along the length of the electrode (NOT going at right angle to it). The arc will follow the direction of the grind, so keep it going toward the point.

    [/QUOTE]

    The article I read is in the July issue of Custom Classic Trucks, and they said to grind the tungstan at the right angle and they say never grind toward the point. I've tried both ways and last night with a right angle grind, I seem to have a lot less wondering, could I be wrong

    Looking at your pics you posted, it looks like I need to grind at a much lower angel.

    I like your Dremel idea. I have an extra one that I'll have to set up tonight and give it a try.

    Thanks
    Samuria Dave

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    near rochester NY
    Posts
    9,881

    Default

    i have always read grind in the direction of the tungsten, not acrost.
    i wonder if it could have beed a misprint?? D-G advises to grind in the direction of the tungsten, thats all they do and they are defenetly one of the best in the field when it comes to tungsten.
    i would wright the editor for a clarification. if the arc fallows the grind and its acrost the tungsten, how could it come off the tip strait at the work???

    i would stick with grinding with the tungsten.
    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped

    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
    summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
    JAMES

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ventura, California
    Posts
    102

    Default Pricey TIG grinders

    Quote Originally Posted by fun4now View Post
    Samurai Dave
    thats a good idea, i might just have to give that a try.
    i been looking at 6" D-wheels for a bench grinder to dedicate to tungsten, but they are prity expensve.
    Indeed, there are some very NICE dedicated TIG electrode grinders out there. The one I like has water with the grinding wheel to keep everything cool, AND to collect the grinding dust. However, they cost an INSANE amount, like more than some TIG welders.

    Speaking of tungsten dust, I always wear a respirator or mask, especially if grinding Thoriated. (Don't mean to sound like a wimp, but I just don't want to risk lung cancer, no matter now remote the chance.)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Hampton, Va.
    Posts
    386

    Default Tunsten grinding

    I agree with tsalagi I also grind the tungsten on my grinding wheel and keep on welding. I have welded ss and went to carbon using the same ground tunsten and in 27 yrs welding nuclear pipe on subs I never had any problem. I think everyone has a preference and mine was grind it by rolling it along my angle grinder no matter what kind of metal other than alum and keep going. I also used the same wire brush on all types os metals but alum.

    Just my opinion
    Wheelchair

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    collinsville, ok
    Posts
    86

    Default

    hey wheelchair,
    glad to see i'm not the only backwoods around. i found out that if i use a wire brush that has been used on carbon on duplex i'll get rust on that weld. if i use a 302 stainless brush, it's all good.
    fun4now asked a good question. how do you keep a steady arc if there are ridges all down the tip?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    near rochester NY
    Posts
    9,881

    Default

    Samurai Dave
    Speaking of tungsten dust, I always wear a respirator or mask, especially if grinding Thoriated. (Don't mean to sound like a wimp, but I just don't want to risk lung cancer, no matter now remote the chance.)
    dont feel bad about safty, i would never even boither to use thorated for just that reason, too many better options out there, 2% lanthanated works great for AC or DC and will work just as well in a transformer as it dose in an inverter. no point in risking it is how i see it.
    as for the dedicated grinder's, your wright its insane how expensive thay are???
    i was not talking about getting one of then but rather just getting the D-disk to put on my 6: bench grinder. they also have some due grit options. in comparisin to the dedicated grinders they are prity cheap at $40-120 a disk, far better than buying a PIII price wise but the PIII is suposed to be a great grinder, just way too much $$ for me
    they do cover the grind direction isu though, if they set up a $2000= grinder to grind with the direction of the tungsten tword the point, it must be the best way to do it. only thing i can see this guy saying grind sideways for is it might be safer from a kickback point of view ?? but i suspect its a typo, again a letter to the editor would be in order if ya ask me.might even get ya a free subscription renewal out of it.
    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped

    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
    summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
    JAMES

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Function split() is deprecated in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/footer.inc.php on line 82

Welding Projects

Special Offers: See the latest Miller deals and promotions.