Miller Electric

Welding Discussion Forums

Home » Resources » Communities » Welding Discussion Forums
 
Miller Welding Discussion Forums - Powered by vBulletin

Page 9 of 12 FirstFirst ... 456789101112 LastLast
Results 81 to 90 of 112
  1. #81
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Deltaville, VA
    Posts
    2,239

    Default

    Mr Goodhandjob,

    You're right about one thing, I do weld on boats. Unless I misread something to begin with the OP was asking a question about "welding on boats", not how farmers weld irrigation pipe.

    Seems that it may, in fact, be you who's not the sharpest knife in the drawer.

    By the way, I do happen to have a MM251 w/30A spoolgun and a Syncrowave 250DX in the shop, either of which do a fine job with aluminum. For 90% of the repairs I do, tig is my choice. Just much better control of the heat and less potential for doing significant additional damage to the base metal. Nearly all boats have some oxidation which must be removed prior to welding. Very difficult to properly gauge the heat, filler deposit with mig.

    But then again, you've got one of those supercharged 120v migs which will do everything the big boys will do. NOT!

    How many pro's have to tell you the OP's machine is underpowered for the job before you believe it?

  2. #82
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Montana, USA
    Posts
    234

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SundownIII View Post
    Mr Goodhandjob,

    You're right about one thing, I do weld on boats. Unless I misread something to begin with the OP was asking a question about "welding on boats", not how farmers weld irrigation pipe.

    Seems that it may, in fact, be you who's not the sharpest knife in the drawer.

    By the way, I do happen to have a MM251 w/30A spoolgun and a Syncrowave 250DX in the shop, either of which do a fine job with aluminum. For 90% of the repairs I do, tig is my choice. Just much better control of the heat and less potential for doing significant additional damage to the base metal. Nearly all boats have some oxidation which must be removed prior to welding. Very difficult to properly gauge the heat, filler deposit with mig.

    But then again, you've got one of those supercharged 120v migs which will do everything the big boys will do. NOT!

    How many pro's have to tell you the OP's machine is underpowered for the job before you believe it?
    The reason I question your intelligence is because you keep making illogical statements, proving you don't have a clue about a lot of things. It might surprise you to find out that a lot of irrigation pipe is made out of aluminum... just like a lot of boats. Cool, huh?

    Just can't figure out why you keep coming back with such non-helpful info. If OP can get his boat to me, I will show him how he can weld his boat just fine with his teeny, tiny 120 volt machine. Don't know why you keep trying to prove that your machine is bigger than OP's or mine... just not needed for his application. I've never implied that you don't know how to weld on boats, and you probably do a very competent job, but you don't know all things welding, you just think you do. Now, go back to watching Bevis and Butthead.
    Last edited by Goodhand; 09-11-2008 at 11:32 PM.

  3. #83
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    224

    Default

    Warning to young ladies:
    If you wear loose clothes, beware of the machinery. If you wear tight clothes, beware of the machinist.

  4. #84
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Montana, USA
    Posts
    234

    Default

    That's good for laughs.

  5. #85
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Bulverde, Tx
    Posts
    1,244

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Goodhand View Post
    The reason I question your intelligence is because you keep making illogical statements, proving you don't have a clue about a lot of things. It might surprise you to find out that a lot of irrigation pipe is made out of aluminum... just like a lot of boats. Cool, huh?

    Just can't figure out why you keep coming back with such non-helpful info. If OP can get his boat to me, I will show him how he can weld his boat just fine with his teeny, tiny 120 volt machine. Don't know why you keep trying to prove that your machine is bigger than OP's or mine... just not needed for his application. I've never implied that you don't know how to weld on boats, and you probably do a very competent job, but you don't know all things welding, you just think you do. Now, go back to watching Bevis and Butthead.
    Man, I have yet to see any illogical statements made by Sundown. He does know his stuff. What I do see is a belligerant attitude on your part because he disagrees with you. I have run alu with a 120v machine. Quite a bit of it and more than enough to know it doesn't work that well. It is fine to play with, but not for general application, and esp a 100a machine. I was using a 135 and it was too cold..I can only guess what a 100a would be like. It will not hit spray transfer at 100a. Spray is what you must have for a good, durable alu weld. Of the welds you posted, while they looked ok, only one was possibly in spray transfer. The others were most definitely short circuit. Any time an alu bead sits on the top and doesn't flow out and have a almost flat profile, it was not spray. Boat hulls have a completely different stress profile than a simple irrigation pipe. Telling him he can get it done properly with the small machine is flat out wrong and irresponsible. If you had more time under the hood with alu, you'd know that. Just because it looks ok and you think it is ok, doesn't make it so. Cold lap and incomplete fusion are death to alu welds. Cld lap you can see...but how will you see the fusion?? You need to be doing it right to start with and then it isn't a problem.

    To the OP, practice with the small unit to try to get a feel for the alu. It is funny stuff. BUT, for welding the boat hull, I would recommend renting or borrowing at least a 175/180 class machine. That thickness is within their capabilities. You will see a world of difference between the two.
    Don


    '06 Trailblazer 302
    '06 12RC feeder
    Super S-32P feeder

    HH210 & DP3035 spool gun
    Esab Multimaster 260
    Esab Heliarc 252 AC/DC

  6. #86
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Deltaville, VA
    Posts
    2,239

    Default

    Don,

    Insightful post.

    One of the reasons I take exception with "guidance" from posters who've never performed a particular repair but are quick to tell someone how to do it is because of all the damage I've seen done by inexperienced "first timer's".

    I've seen so many botched repairs that made "proper repair" almost impossible. If the owner had taken his boat to someone who knew what he was doing, it would have been a simple repair. Almost invariably, the repair becomes much more difficult because some "do it yourselfer" attempted it. You've either got BB's all over the base material, or you've got holes blown in the material. Aluminum that's been exposed to the marine environment presents challenges not encountered in other applications.

    Seriously, after looking at the OP's photos of his practice welds on aluminum, is there anyone on here who thinks he's ready (or will be in the immediate future) to tackle his boat, regardless of the equipment (welder) he has available.

    Thinner aluminum (.10" or so) is tough enough to do properly with mig (got to run so fast). That's when you know what you're dealing with (new, non-fatigued metal). On a used boat, that's nearly never the case.

    Just seen way too many cases where a simple repair became a major project because some inexperienced trigger puller "botched the job". Having "seen someone do it" is not the same as having done it many times over. Would you want someone performing open heart surgery on you because he had seen it done on "General Hospital"?

    Back to watching and laughing at some of the posters here.

  7. #87
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    17

    Default

    I have come to a decision to not mig on the boat. Instead I just used another method of the torch and filler rod to get the job done. The metal on the boat it too thick compared to the riv nuts. With the torch and filler method, It came out perfect. I am still going to try and perfect the mig welding on aluminum. Thanks to everyone for the input. Even the ladies bickering back and forth. Everyone has been helpful. Thanks

  8. #88

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by josterbauer View Post
    Thanks to everyone for the input. Even the ladies bickering back and forth. Everyone has been helpful. Thanks

    You should understand that in welding and welding repairs there is many times ONE correct method.
    Sometimes there is ONE correct method but another one or two that will work, just not as well.
    Sometimes there are multiple solutions that will work equally well, but not usually.

    So, when there is a discussion (arguement, whatever) going on over the proper way to do the job it means (most times) that one person is right and the other person is wrong. There is no shortage of bad welding related info on the net. When knowledgable people make an effort to correct bad info they usually get bashed by those putting out the bad.

    So sometimes you need to look closely at what you call "bickering" because chances are someone with real world, first hand experience is trying to keep you from following bad advise from an internet welder.

    Commenting on your craft, the means by which you pay the bills and feed the kids, is not being a "bickering lady" but trying to helpfull and keep good accurate info out there.

    My take.

    JTMcC.
    Some days you eat the bear. And some days the bear eats you.

  9. #89
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Montana, USA
    Posts
    234

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by josterbauer View Post
    Thanks to everyone for the input. Even the ladies bickering back and forth.
    Hey, josterbauer, up yours,

    After all of the time and effort I spent trying to help you figure out your poor welding, I think your post is pretty disrespectful. But, it does put you in company with self-proclaimed "pros" who are so stupid, they think they know it all. Being a scientist, inventor, and doctor, I'm sure glad they all chose a field other than medicine, wherein one needs to make rational decisions. Many of the posters in this string have made it abundantly clear that those types of decisions are not necessary in order to be a welder. Notice I did not generalize (as sundown is often quick to do) and say that all welders fit this category.

    I spent the afternoon fishing with a good friend, who is the lead welder (and tig artist) at a local fabrication shop, and when I told how I was dissed because I welded up a tow bar with my 120 volt machine, he asked, "Why couldn't you do it?" He then commented that some guys just think they know it all (sound familiar?).
    Last edited by Goodhand; 09-13-2008 at 08:06 PM.

  10. #90
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Vero Beach, fl.
    Posts
    761

    Default

    Hey Goodhand, I've been sitting back here for awhile tempted to jump in but decided it wasn't worth it. But I will make it known that in my opinion the guys on here that I would take their advice to the bank are SundownIII, DDA52, KB Fab, Black Wolf, Calweld, Fat Fab and a few others. They have probably forgotten more than you will ever be able to learn in your lifetime. If they say the OP don't have enough machine or experience to do the proper job, it means he ain't got enough machine or experience to do the job, case closed. So if I was you I would sit back and be humbled by their collective experience.

    Oh, and by the way, I've been welding for 20 some odd years myself and still learn things from these guys.
    If necessity is the Mother of Invention, I must be the Father of Desperation!

    John Blewett III 10-22-73 to 8-16-07
    Another racing great gone but not to be forgotten.http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...modified&hl=en

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Non-static method PhpQuickProfiler::getMicroTime() should not be called statically in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/pqp/classes/Console.php on line 77

Warning: Function split() is deprecated in /mnt/stor3-wc1-dfw1/357822/357839/www.millerwelds.com/web/content/lib/footer.inc.php on line 82

Welding Projects

Special Offers: See the latest Miller deals and promotions.