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  1. #1

    Default Any ideas on air compressor dolly/mount

    So I have a monster of an air compressor, and as much as I would like to say I have been able to keep a shop longer than a few months something always happens, layoffs, fire from a neighbors barbecue lighting the grass and hitting the shop while I'm at work, etc. So now that I am about to have a shop again I have been giving a lot of thought to portability and saving my aching back since I have had to move all this heavy stuff 3 or 4 times.




    This is the type of compressor im dealing with and it's a top heavy son of a gun. To be honest I'm kinda at a loss when trying to sketch up a design that lets me mount the claw feet on the compressor to it, keeps it as low to the ground as possible, and helps keep it from tipping over when I need to push it up a ramp. Figure it would need something to let me lower it to the floor so it can be bolted down when in use right through the frame of the dolly.

    So any ideas? I know there are some talented people on this site that are bored enough to work for free


    I can show you what I do have sketched out and mention all it's weak points too once I get near a scanner again.

    Thanks to anyone that replies

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    Default

    I would get a Convertible Dolly an extend it/make it a little taller

    http://www.handtrucksrus.com/crashdetail.aspx?id=891


    As far as the Feet- just place a piece of 3/4" Plywood cut to a decent size foot print and then bolt it down right through the Wood and the Dolly Foot Plate
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
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    16919 Pole Rd. Brethren, MI 49619
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    Everything in my place is portable, most of it moves with a pallet jack. Its bolted to the wood, just sits on the floor. The one under the sound blanket is on a skid too. I had to raise the shelf on the parts washer about an inch to make it work. I rarely move this tool box and it was really too heavy for the wheels I stole for something else but it can be handled with a jack.
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Colorado
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    Since the top is wider than the base, that's your 'used up' floorspace. That's where I'd 'dimension' the centerline of the axles. Whether axle or caster. Wider in any direction available, will help.
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    If it were oilless, I'd turn it on its side without modification.

    Since it's got a oil filled crankcase, here's what I'd do:

    I'd cut the plate off the top that holds the motor and compressor and remove the copper fill tube. I'd turn the tank on its side and attach O/A cart wheels just behind the balance point. Then I would attach the plate with motor and compressor to the "new top" of the tank (aka the "old side"). Install a longer copper fill tube and it will roll around like a wheelbarrow without being so darn topheavy.

    Note that I didn't suggest you weld anything to your tank. That probably would void the nameplate that says it meets ASME code. Of course, what you do with your tank is your business.

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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    near rochester NY
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    Lightbulb

    i left mine on its delivery pallet. its almost the same dimensions as the top so no space waisted on the floor. stick a dolly under it and strap it in tight and it moves as easy as can be expected for a huge air compressor. a few beer's for a friend made the move essayer too.
    if its a must move often thing you might consider a low boy wheel setup ( no idea what they are called??see pic's) but adding a few screw down feet that would lift the wheels off the ground once in place would be easy enough. from looking at my compressor ( the single stage husky smiler to your's) it looks like you could slip one dolly under each of the 4 feet. with the all direction wheel setup the move would be easy to maneuver into place then screw down the feet. ( like a refrigerator or washer leveler foot) that would not end up with it bolted to the floor although you could alter the dolly with some form of floor bolting option if you wanted or just put a piece of an old tire under each foot, or park it on a rubber floor mat. that should keep it in place till its time to move again.
    hope the pic helps. you might even be able to fabricate some thing smiler to use. with 4 wheels at each of the 4 feet it should handle the wait of the compressor easily.
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    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped

    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    28

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bodybagger View Post
    If it were oilless, I'd turn it on its side without modification.

    Since it's got a oil filled crankcase, here's what I'd do:

    I'd cut the plate off the top that holds the motor and compressor and remove the copper fill tube. I'd turn the tank on its side and attach O/A cart wheels just behind the balance point. Then I would attach the plate with motor and compressor to the "new top" of the tank (aka the "old side"). Install a longer copper fill tube and it will roll around like a wheelbarrow without being so darn topheavy.

    Note that I didn't suggest you weld anything to your tank. That probably would void the nameplate that says it meets ASME code. Of course, what you do with your tank is your business.
    Thats what we do to stuff like this we have to move around our shop. One thing that might be good is to mount fixed casters that stick out sideways to one end and then have a simple tug you can hook onto a plate in the front. We call the tug a "B*tch" in our shop but it is a handle with a set of wheel and a pivot point so you can pick up the front of carts and move them around (think of the little trailer movers).

    If you are trying to load all your stuff in a truck alot, why not go to harborfreight.com and get a simple cheap bedmounted hand crank hoist? thats what we have on a crappy old trailer that was well worth the 90 bux we paid for it.
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    southwestern ohio
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    272

    Default

    Whatever happened to the skid that it came on, leaving the shippinskid on will reduce noise from vibration and make it to where you can easily rock the tank fromside to side to move it around. You may want to put it on a new skid. Do you have an engine hoist? If so you can make a dollie with some 6in pnumatic casters on it and when you need to move it lift up the compressor and set it on the dollie.

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