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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    5

    Default Motorcycle training wheels

    Do any of you have a kids motorcycle with training wheels? If so, I would like to know how wide they are. I'm building a set for my kid's bike.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Belle Plaine Iowa
    Posts
    270

    Default

    Teach the kids how to ride a bicycle without training wheels first. After that anybody can ride a motorcycle. Ive seen kids riding like that and theyll tip onto the training wheel, let the engine rev, then come back down on the spinning drive wheel(usually looking backwards). Thats when the real problems start. I would avoid the training wheels as a matter of safety.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    5

    Default

    He can ride his bike without training wheels. He had a pretty bad crash on the motorcycle, so I plan on using the training wheels so he can get efficient with the throttle and brake. He's just a bit short for the bike, so I thought this would be a good way to get him started. I don't think he will need them long at all. Also, with the suspension on the bike, he should have 4 wheels on the ground at all times.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    near rochester NY
    Posts
    9,881

    Default

    i gotta agree with Flyingpig, i think the training wheel will make it dangerous. throw some pad's on him and let him at it.life is full of lil bump's, he will get the hang of it fast enough, just stay slow till he dose (easyer said then done.)
    thanks for the help
    ......or..........
    hope i helped

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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    148

    Default

    Training wheels are a bad idea on a motorcycle. Motorcycles, when on two wheels, use "counter steering" to turn. This means you actually turn away from the direction you want to go. But when a motorcycle has three wheels (training wheels or a side car) they actually steer like a car...turn into the direction you want to go. Therefore as a motorcycle (or a bicycles) shifts back and forth between two and three wheels, the bike is constantly changing direction. This might be OK on a bicycle that doesn't go very fast, but on any size motorcycle, it a disaster. Many folks have been killed with sidecar rigs, going around a corner with three wheels on the ground and suddenly you "fly the car" and lift the sidecar wheel. The motorcycle immediately reverts to counter steer and you cross the yellow line and have a head-on with oncoming traffic.

    No child should be on a motorcycle that can't handle a bicycle perfectly IMO
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    North of Phila. PA
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    Default

    rbertalotto interesting comment on how bikes vs cars steer. Sort of makes sense but I'm just not visuallizing the mechanics of it right now. I undersatnd the concept however. I used to run an 80K articulated loader occasionally and it always took me a bit to get used to the steering after not running it for quite a while. You turned the wheel to go right but your body would turn left at first ( you were sitting behind the pivot ) It would take a bit to stop reacting to the "wrong" visual input. When you least expected it, say in a panic situation where someone pulled out in front of you, you would instintively try to correct for what your eyes were telling you was wrong when turning and try to turn back the other way.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    673

    Exclamation

    Quote Originally Posted by David_D. View Post
    He had a pretty bad crash on the motorcycle.....
    Quote Originally Posted by rbertalotto View Post
    Training wheels are a bad idea on a motorcycle. <snip>
    No child should be on a motorcycle that can't handle a bicycle perfectly. IMO
    I agree with everything Flyingpig and Rbertalotto said.
    FWIW: I've been riding almost 40 years.
    Last edited by Craig in Denver; 06-25-2008 at 12:43 PM.
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    2,890

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rbertalotto View Post
    Training wheels are a bad idea on a motorcycle. Motorcycles, when on two wheels, use "counter steering" to turn. This means you actually turn away from the direction you want to go. But when a motorcycle has three wheels (training wheels or a side car) they actually steer like a car...turn into the direction you want to go. Therefore as a motorcycle (or a bicycles) shifts back and forth between two and three wheels, the bike is constantly changing direction. This might be OK on a bicycle that doesn't go very fast, but on any size motorcycle, it a disaster. Many folks have been killed with sidecar rigs, going around a corner with three wheels on the ground and suddenly you "fly the car" and lift the sidecar wheel. The motorcycle immediately reverts to counter steer and you cross the yellow line and have a head-on with oncoming traffic.

    No child should be on a motorcycle that can't handle a bicycle perfectly IMO
    I doubt he'll be crossing the Yellow Line riding in the dirt or dealing with Counter steering

    Of course I'm assuming he is adding Training wheels to a little 50cc Dirt Bike - I mean who would add training wheels to a street bike
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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DSW View Post
    rbertalotto interesting comment on how bikes vs cars steer. Sort of makes sense but I'm just not visuallizing the mechanics of it right now. I undersatnd the concept however. I used to run an 80K articulated loader occasionally and it always took me a bit to get used to the steering after not running it for quite a while. You turned the wheel to go right but your body would turn left at first ( you were sitting behind the pivot ) It would take a bit to stop reacting to the "wrong" visual input. When you least expected it, say in a panic situation where someone pulled out in front of you, you would instintively try to correct for what your eyes were telling you was wrong when turning and try to turn back the other way.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Countersteering


    Enjoy
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  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Florida, USA
    Posts
    3

    Smile

    Here is some motorcycle training wheels I saw in Daytona Memorial weekend and this is not for me but the lady riding it was pretty
    Hmm, I was going to show them as an attachment but it won't let me ?
    I tried.

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