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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Northern CA
    Posts
    90

    Default New Truck Rack design

    I just finished this new rack design for late model Chevy's and eventually other trucks. I kept the design simple and somewhat lightweight so that it can ship UPS. (I'm going to try and start selling these but that's not why i'm posting it here)
    The rack mounts to the front stake pockets in the bed by a simple plate with a nut welded on the backside that sandwiches the edges of the stake pockets between it and the rack. It is surprisingly strong and means no drilling.
    Paint is done by the advice of Dabar; rustoleum rusty metal primer and gloss black thinned 20% or so and applied with an HVLP spraygun. Worked great, thanks Dabar!

    If there's any obvious design flaws, point them out! (no screen is not one of them..that's intentional)
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    12

    Default

    This is probably overly fussy, but I'd rather see the side posts carried higher, so the crossbar can weld directly to them. This keeps fewer parts and welds involved in the critical structure. The side post extension, which would then be non-structural, could be welded on later. You've used a gusset, so it probably doesn't make a whole lot of difference, but since you asked...

    Tim

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Northern CA
    Posts
    90

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TimS View Post
    This is probably overly fussy, but I'd rather see the side posts carried higher, so the crossbar can weld directly to them. This keeps fewer parts and welds involved in the critical structure. The side post extension, which would then be non-structural, could be welded on later. You've used a gusset, so it probably doesn't make a whole lot of difference, but since you asked...

    Tim
    Noted...Anyone else?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    northern NJ
    Posts
    1,841

    Default

    A few more tie down loops. I use chain links on the ones I make. Looks nice.
    MM250
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Northern CA
    Posts
    90

    Default

    Chain links are not a bad idea. I thought about using D-rings but that is a little over the top. I've only ever used hooks like this. I didn't put much thought into the height and placement of the hooks though but that seems to work.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Vero Beach, fl.
    Posts
    761

    Default

    Are you using anything for a buffer in between the rack and the bed rail? I cut out pieces of rubber matting and sandwich in between to keep rubbing the paint off of the bed rail. Glad you liked the idea of Rust-O-Leum over some of the higher priced options, but if you plan on doing them in a production type of setting you may want to consider getting into powder coating, It's not as expensive as you might think. Dave
    If necessity is the Mother of Invention, I must be the Father of Desperation!

    John Blewett III 10-22-73 to 8-16-07
    Another racing great gone but not to be forgotten.http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...modified&hl=en

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    673

    Lightbulb

    It's a nice simple design and would last me forever.

    Edit: Oops, reread your post. Opinion withdrawn.
    Last edited by Craig in Denver; 05-28-2008 at 07:43 PM.
    RETIRED desk jockey.

    Hobby weldor with a little training.

    Craftsman O/A---Flat, Vert, Ovhd, Horz.

    Miller Syncrowave 250.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    North of Phila. PA
    Posts
    404

    Default

    For me the top extensions are too short. Looks to be only 3-4" max. I actually put lumber on my racks and that's only 2-3 2x's stacked. Nit picking I know.

    Looks very nice BTW. Does it fit in an acceptable size box for UPS or FedEx shipping? I forget the max sizes they accept. You may be able to make the design a breakdown design if the horizontal bar could slide down over the vertical supports and get secured with a bolt. Just a thought for decreasing shipping costs and box costs. I would also think about powercoating the frame as suggested above.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Northern CA
    Posts
    90

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dabar39 View Post
    Are you using anything for a buffer in between the rack and the bed rail? I cut out pieces of rubber matting and sandwich in between to keep rubbing the paint off of the bed rail. Glad you liked the idea of Rust-O-Leum over some of the higher priced options, but if you plan on doing them in a production type of setting you may want to consider getting into powder coating, It's not as expensive as you might think. Dave
    thanks for the advice. I don't think I'll really be going into any production. This is just a design that can be manufactured quickly and somewhat cost-effectively. I've sold some simmilar models to people who asked me to build them but I'm such a tiny shop there is no way for me to do anything on a big scale.
    Oh and about the "buffer" I still need to pick up some rubber matting. Any good sources for something like that besides McMaster-Carr or the obvious Home Depot?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Northern CA
    Posts
    90

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Craig in Denver View Post
    It's a nice simple design and would last me forever.

    Edit: Oops, reread your post. Opinion withdrawn.
    Which part? I'm open to critique

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