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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    184

    Default

    I don't know what your taps equal in voltage but would
    suggest the the wire speed numbers you posted will be way
    out of the starting ballpark. I'd be thinking something
    more into the 200ipm range to start with.

    Edit
    You want to make up some practice joints. Don't just do em flat
    on a table, do them overhead, sideways, stand on one foot using
    your left hand with one eye closed etc. Do em while your upside
    down with sharp objects poking you in the ribs and back with
    sparks falling down your neck and you can't really see the weld area.
    These are real cage welding practice problems.
    Dave P.
    Last edited by FM117; 04-03-2008 at 08:03 AM.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    621

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FM117 View Post
    You want to make up some practice joints. Don't just do em flat
    on a table, do them overhead, sideways, stand on one foot using
    your left hand with one eye closed etc. Do em while your upside
    down with sharp objects poking you in the ribs and back with
    sparks falling down your neck and you can't really see the weld area.
    These are real cage welding practice problems.
    Dave P.
    Is there a practical welding test like this?
    Miller Maxstar 200 DX
    RMLS-14 Momentary Hand Control
    Miller Syncrowave 180 SD
    Porter Cable 14" dry metal saw
    Hitachi 4.5" grinder
    http://mhayesdesign.com

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    298

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FM117 View Post
    I don't know what your taps equal in voltage but would
    suggest the the wire speed numbers you posted will be way
    out of the starting ballpark. I'd be thinking something
    more into the 200ipm range to start with.

    Edit
    You want to make up some practice joints. Don't just do em flat
    on a table, do them overhead, sideways, stand on one foot using
    your left hand with one eye closed etc. Do em while your upside
    down with sharp objects poking you in the ribs and back with
    sparks falling down your neck and you can't really see the weld area.
    These are real cage welding practice problems.
    Dave P.
    Add slithering in and out of the caged car about 20 times an hour too. Get in get placed and find that (fill in the blank) is not on/open/set right/pluged in/long enough or near you. Get out, correct issue, get in get set then get back out to welding hat that is sitting on top of the welder. Get back in and get right back out to answer the phone that is on the work bench and not in your pocket.
    Last edited by Vicegrip; 04-03-2008 at 12:38 PM.
    Weekend wannab racer with some welders.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    184

    Default

    Vicegrip,
    You got the idea, add about 95 degrees and plenty of
    humidity, somebody that wants it yesterday
    (and was dumb enough to tell you they bent/broke
    it 6 weeks ago at their last event).
    Dave P

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    612

    Default

    I would suggest building a rotisserie. "Not just for hog roasts anymore"

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    La Porte, Tx.
    Posts
    56

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tasslehawf View Post
    Is there a practical welding test like this?


    Yes, there is, for process piping.
    pull-do

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    673

    Exclamation

    Quote Originally Posted by FM117 View Post
    Edit
    You want to make up some practice joints. Don't just do em flat
    on a table, do them overhead, sideways, stand on one foot using
    your left hand with one eye closed etc. Do em while your upside
    down with sharp objects poking you in the ribs and back with
    sparks falling down your neck and you can't really see the weld area.
    These are real cage welding practice problems.
    Dave P.
    BINGO! This is exactly why I don't consider myself a real weldor.
    RETIRED desk jockey.

    Hobby weldor with a little training.

    Craftsman O/A---Flat, Vert, Ovhd, Horz.

    Miller Syncrowave 250.

  8. #18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Vicegrip View Post
    The actual welding is about 5% of the time spent building a good cage IMO. Thinking, planning, drawing, cutting, bending, fitting, cutting, fitting, recutting, fitting and tweeking are about 90%.
    This cannot be stressed enough. Think at least 3 steps ahead of yourself... it'll keep you from welding yourself into a corner... or more importantly a joint that you cant get the backside welded
    Scott Rhea
    It's not what you build...
    it's how you build it
    Izzy's Custom Cages

  9. #19
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Lebanon, Oregon
    Posts
    31

    Default


    I just read this thread and will agree with everything in the replies, but I believe that there's been one important thing that was overlooked and it will show up during tech inspection.

    Creg stated that he wanted to use .095" x 1.5" tube for the roll cage. I would recommend that he get a rule book from whatever scantioning body this car will fall under and find out what the min. wall thickness allowed is. My point is, lets say, ......... the rule book says that the min. wall is .095", this will be where the problem lies. In the process of bending tubing, the tube will stretch and this will cause the wall thickness to become less than what it is when straight. If the rule book says .095" is the min. thickness allowed, then at most all the bends, in the roll cage, the wall thickness is less than .095" and the car can fail inspection. This is especially true when there are any 90 degree bends involved.

    Having worked with pipe and tubing most of my life and also the building of a few roll cages, this minor point has been overlooked quite a few times by others, until you hit the tech inspections, and that's where you DON"T want to find any BIG problems.

    You might want to check with someone in tech or somebody that does know if this will present a problem. I do know that when you bend pipe or tube something HAS to give and it's the wall thickness that does the giving.

    Just thought I'd bring this up, because I'd hate to see all your work go to waste for something that was overlooked, during your time consuming build.

    Hope this info helps.

    Bill
    Last edited by diverbill45; 04-30-2008 at 09:44 PM.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    612

    Default

    Good point Bill. When I saw it wasn't an NHRA or IHRA cage I didn't mention anything because I'm not familiar with anything but those 2 sanctioning bodies. I know my mild steel cage is .118" minimum by the rule book. The tubing I purchased from Art Morrison was .134'. I bought some from a speed shop @ .124". Even the .124" you have to mic & be very careful with.

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