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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Oahu, Hawaii
    Posts
    2,469

    Default

    How do you weld with water still coming out?
    bert
    p.s. Is that a Craftsman 4 1/2 " grinder? and what was the bolt for?
    I'm not late...
    I'm just on Hawaiian Time

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    DFW area
    Posts
    180

    Default

    I don't know if they're still around, but years ago when I did alot of commercial plumbing, the Plumbing Supply and/or Air Conditioner Supply houses had a clamp-on patch for doing that on a 'live' water system.

    We'd get a leak in a chill water AC system, and use them as a permanant repair 'till Winter came along and we could shut down & drain the water out for welding the leak like 'normal'.

    These patches were a strap of Stainless Steel about a foot long, size specific for the pipe, with a pretty thick neopreme sheet on the inside. The lengthwise edges were rolled up over a bar (on each side)and had nuts & bolts going through every couple of inches. The neopreme was thick enough to use/seal over a leaking weld seam joing two pieces of pipe together also.

    We had to use one under a parking lot one time. We dug up/exposed the pipe, patched it, then a few months later, the parking lot got re-surfaced. We couldn't find it again. Rather than dig up a bunch of new parking lot, we just left it. Far as I know, its still holding, and that was about 10 years ago.

    They worked great. All it took to use one was:
    Find the leak, clean the area, wrap the patch around the pipe, put the nuts & bolts through, and tighten them down.


    .
    "Gone are the days of wooden ships, and Iron men.
    I doubt we'll see either of their likes again".

    Circa 1920.
    Author:
    Unknown US Coast Guard unit Commander.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    ****inson ND
    Posts
    557

    Talking

    Thats how they repair water mains usualy, same exact device. It's also a permanent solution, so you don't have to replace it later if it's instaled properly.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Ocean City, Maryland
    Posts
    951

    Question

    Here's a dumb question I see alot of guys use 6010 rods. Why? I have never used 6010. I have used 6011, 6013 alot and 7018 most, but it seems 6010 is mentioned alot. Is there something about it thats good for something special? I know 60xx is 60,000 lbs, and the xx1x is all postion, the xxx0 I think is DC only. So what makes this rod better than say a 6011??
    Scott
    HMW [Heavy Metal welding]

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Vero Beach, fl.
    Posts
    761

    Default Hmw

    I think it might be a territorial issue on rod usage. Down here in Florida ( or at least in my area) the rod of choice is 6011 or 7018 for most applications. I have traveled quite a bit thruogh out the country and each demographic area seems to have their own preferance. Is one really any better than the other? I can't really say as I have had good results with all types of rod, but I personally prefer 6011 as an all purpose rod over the others for general duty type welds. Dave
    If necessity is the Mother of Invention, I must be the Father of Desperation!

    John Blewett III 10-22-73 to 8-16-07
    Another racing great gone but not to be forgotten.http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...modified&hl=en

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Ocean City, Maryland
    Posts
    951

    Default Dabar39

    Thats kinda my preference, just didn't know if the 6010 was better in some way, Thanks
    Scott
    HMW [Heavy Metal welding]

  7. #17
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Grande Prairie, Alberta Canada
    Posts
    729

    Default 6010 Rods

    We use 6010 rods up here a lot for root passes on pipe. It is a good choice because we can push the weld through the gap between the lands of the 'v' groove, the rod freezes quickly, and provides weld re-inforcement to the inside of the pipe. The hot pass - usually a 7018 or similiar is used to burn out any slag inclusions, and fill any undercut left behind by the 6010. I use it sometimes for a root pass when doing repairs to accomodate poor fit up when you can't get in there for proper weld prep. My hot pass, extra fill passes, and cap pass are ususally 7018,8018,10018,11018 etc.
    I also use 6010 for welding on gauge metal lightboxes etc. when I'm outside to prevent burnthrough or distortion.

    I am not a pipeline welder so if I offended anyone, I apologize in advance.

    Later,
    Last edited by Black Wolf; 05-15-2007 at 08:09 PM. Reason: spelling

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    ****inson ND
    Posts
    557

    Talking

    6010 is very similar to 6011. It's DC only and is a little less agressive. 6011 is better suited to dirty, painted, and rusty metals. 6011 is AC or DC and has a far less stable arc on AC. 6010 is smoother running and for most ppl. has more control over the arc. I always choose 6010 over 6011 unless it's crummy metal then I'll use 6011. Also you can take either one (6011 preferably) and quick dip the rod in water then crank your machine all the way and use it for severing plates and stuff. The water gives it a more agressive arc and alows for better cutting. It actualy works realy well for non critical stuff and quick fixes when decent cutting tools arn't availale.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Dallas, TX area
    Posts
    267

    Default Excellent questions.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bert View Post
    How do you weld with water still coming out?
    bert
    p.s. Is that a Craftsman 4 1/2 " grinder? and what was the bolt for?
    To weld through the flowing water, we were running our 1/8" rods at 250 amps to keep the puddle fluid. That indeed was a Craftsman grinder (good eye). The bolt was the final step in stopping the leak. When we tried to weld it up, the pressure on the pipe kept blowing out the puddle before it could be fully closed and the final "plug" had to be mechanical.

    Quote Originally Posted by HMW View Post
    Here's a dumb question I see alot of guys use 6010 rods. Why?
    Your question could not be further from dumb. 6010 rod is used by pipe welders to make the root pass. When done correctly, the weld bead will be on the inside of the pipe demonstrating complete penetration and forging a fluid tight seal. The next pass(es) are done differently by different welders. I run my hot passes with 6010 because I like the way it lays down. When running 6010, you actually drag the rod tip in the puddle and maintain that contact. Other welders, like my partner in the pic (he is the best welder I have ever known), run their hot passes with 7018 for strength. Then cap it with 7018 for strength and that beautiful "stacked" look.

    I hope this helps.
    Triggerman

    Ammonia refrigeration tech
    Trailblazer 302 (yes, it's new)
    Millermatic 180 w/Autoset
    CST-250
    HF-15 High frequency
    XR15 w/Push-Pull Gun
    Victor O/A, DeWalt, North mask


    "A professional knows what to do. A craftsman knows why."

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    258

    Default

    Triggerman,
    Next time you run acroos this problem try sharping a drift punch, drive it into the hole until the water stops, weld around it and cut it off. We have done this many times on process water, chill water and even high pressure gas.

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