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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Jax, FL
    Posts
    12

    Default Inspiration

    Thanks Bill. My workbench, is getting a makeover now to accomodate my newest hobby and your bench was the inspiration.I have no intention of trying to immitate the "billiard table quality" of your bench. The prospect of using steel now will help to make my bench mobile in the future. I'll share some pictures throughout my project. The 6"x6" legs have limited the mobility of my bench for a very long time, and I can't wait to be able to drag it out for use. The bench is extremely sturdy and has served me well for a long time. Unfortunately I hate to see these legs go to waste, got any ideas? If I don't end up with a better use, they will make great wheel chocks.
    Time to learn & Time to burn...

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    North Central Texas
    Posts
    22

    Default Choose your casters CAREFULLY...

    FD,

    Be sure to get the casters that are rated at, or higher in load bearing capacity, than your workbench weighs. The reddish colored Polyurethane caster wheels seem to work the best on concrete, but under a standing load, they may last only a few years before cracking.

    The other KEY element is with your two swiveling casters. On mine, I have two on one end that swivel and two that are fixed. The two that swivel allow me to guide the direction of where I want to push the workbench. The action of steering your workbench is allowed by the "Caster" or pivot of the two swiveling casters, but can cause the workbench to move, even though I have wheel locking brakes. To keep the workbench from moving around those swivel point, on my front steering casters, each one of the two swivel casters has an index pin that allows me to lock the caster at any one of the 4 compass points in addition to the wheel locking footbrake. When the caster pivots are indexed and locked where both casters are either pointing outward, or both pointing inward, at 90*degrees to the fixed casters, then the workbench won't move as you work and push.

    I've seen casters without this indexing feature at "Tractor Supply" and "Grizzly" that are rated at 900 lbs. EACH, and cost about $27 apiece, no matter if they are the fixed or swivel design.

    Hope that will help.

    Bill

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    North Central Texas
    Posts
    22

    Default posting problem

    Got help from the System's Administrator.

    Ok, third try to post picture of workbench's new partner, a wire welder/plasma cart.

    Using parts and pieces from discarded Office furniture and cabinets, and parts from a discarded lightweight two-wheel dolly, I built this new cart. All parts are bolted together.

    The upper shelf has a hole cut in it in the rear back corner for an Argon/CO2 bottle. There is room for a wire welder and plasma cutter as well. In the storage area below, the doors below keep dust away from welding helment, spools of wire and supplies.

    Hammer-finish spray paint: $16
    Gas Grill Cover for Cart Dust Cover: $5

    Total cost of cart: $21

    Bill
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by BilljustBill; 04-21-2006 at 09:50 PM.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Jax, FL
    Posts
    12

    Default thx again

    I want to say thanks again Bill, I think the best projects always come from other peoples projects. Just like how cars have developed through thte years, imagine if every car maker had to start from a blank page. Every great thing started somewhere, and usually came from someone elses good idea. I have enjoyed the hammer finish paints in my workshop for a very long time, if you guys have never looked at this stuff, you should definately check it out. The first time I used it was painting a old rolling tool chest I got when My grandfather passed away. I did not want to attempt to make it look like a new chest, but wanted to protect it from the elements. This was the perfect product. Bill thanks agiain for the continued inspiration. I have another great cart idea to work with.
    Time to learn & Time to burn...

  5. #25

    Default Frame Table?

    What would it take to build a nice solid frame bench for bike frames? If it was a few inches think of oak or somethin. I do all tig welding so sparks wouldnt be a problem. That workbench is the sweetest thing ever, nice job man.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmdale CA USA
    Posts
    230

    Thumbs up workbench

    Thats one sweet workbench!!!!!!!

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    North Central Texas
    Posts
    22

    Default Thanks

    Thanks for the compliment. The key to build things is to "gather" your supplies ahead of time and when you find them for pennies on the dollar. Keeping your ideas in your head so you'll know what you'll need will help with costs and knowing what to look for....
    Flea markets, surplus stores, and commercial remodel sites are great places to get your supplies or parts for pennies on the dollar, and sometimes, for free.

    You're never too old to "Dumpster Dive"....

    Bill

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