Miller Electric

Welding Discussion Forums

Home » Resources » Communities » Welding Discussion Forums
 
Miller Welding Discussion Forums - Powered by vBulletin

Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    Posts
    304

    Default Steel building weld up suggestions

    I mentioned in another thread that I have been volunteered to help a good friend of mine weld up his new shop building. I'll be the first to say that I'm not an expert in this field, but have been involved in a handful of steel "barn raising" if you will. I'm going to go through the process that I normally use and see what you think about it. After you agree, disagree, or meerly gasp, I'd appreciate any suggestions, cautions, or other words of wisdom on the process.

    The project at hand is a 30'X50'X10' on concrete slab. I think these are the material specs, if not they're close: 4"X4"X1/4" uprights on 10' centers. 2"X4" engineered, prefabed trusses (spanning 30'). Probably be a bolt down instead of a weld plate system. One 10'X10' door in one of the gable ends, and one or two walk doors at variouse points.

    I start by using the laser to check the pad and see just how level it actually is. I level the work from the highest point. If it's within a 1/4" I'll just shim the base plates, if more than that, then compensate the length of the upright when cutting it.

    Layout the first truss and uprights on the slab and heavy tack weld them together. Using either a skytrack or a heavy manlift, suspend the truss/upright assembly over it's location and set it in place. From there square/plumb the assembly with rachets, cables, comealongs, chains, turnbuckles or whatever else that is suitable to the situation. Once in place and plumb/square finish weld and finish anchoring to the slab.

    Leave assembly one secured with cables and set assembly two. Once assembly two is up, tie the two together for safety and stability. Continue on from there with the remaining truss/upright assemblies.

    In the past, I've plated the top of the uprights and welded the truss to that. I've also seen where guys have left the uprights a few inches long and cut a saddle into it for the truss to sit in. Is either one better/worse or is there a better way than that? On the intieror trusses, I typically put a small angle brace from the upright to the span of the truss just to add some deminsional stability for wind load.

    From there, it's just purlins and hanging sheet (which is always fun in the Oklahoma wind!!), but my part will be over by then. All I'm going to really be involved with is hanging the steel.

    Anyway, just looking for thoughts on the subject.

    SSS

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    asheville n.c.
    Posts
    618

    Default

    A-325 or A490 structural bolts? turn of nut method

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    asheville n.c.
    Posts
    618

    Default

    btw is it a prefab building or you using real steel columns beams etc? i put on of those metal buildings together b4 and i would set two trusses on ground put in all perlins etc. skip space then put two more trusses together with perlins etc. then rent the crane and fly my truss packs in place then go back and fill the gaps up with required perlins. i do the same thing with bar-joists and bridging. hate to sound like a kitty but anytime you can do something on flat ground its much easier safer and quicker.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
    Posts
    304

    Default

    It's a prefab kit from a local supplier. I've never put one of their kits together before, but I've done similar ones. I've thought about doing the truss pac idea before, but it's always been on these little buildings (glorified sheds, actually) that would only have one or maybe two pacs. Just never seemed worth while. There'll be about six or eight of us on it, so a couple guys on scissor lifts and others handing stuff up. Shouldn't take long to put up. You'll have to excuse the ignorance, but I'm not familiar with the technical references. It's probably one of those cases that I know what they are and how they are used, but not by it's proper name. Structural steel is something I stay away from unless absolutely necessary. I'll have to do some research and get back on that. SSS
    Last edited by SkidSteerSteve; 04-01-2007 at 09:03 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    asheville n.c.
    Posts
    618

    Default

    if its kit then once columns are plumbed up the trusses ought to level themselves once perlins installed. just secure the first one so it dont fall over and try to leave 1 1/2 to 2 inches grout bed under columns so your building wont sink. btw try to get your columns plumb b4 9 a.m. because the sun will pull the building a little bit or rack it out of plumb as it travels across the sky. shouldnt need to do any welding if its prefab. just a matter of bolting it up. make sure your anchor bolts are straight down your building. they determine how much torching you have to do. wish i could watch

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Oahu, Hawaii
    Posts
    2,469

    Default

    Beamwalker,
    WOW! what a mean guy You would watch and not help????
    I'm not late...
    I'm just on Hawaiian Time

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    asheville n.c.
    Posts
    618

    Default

    of course i would watch. id help eat the food and drink the beer tho id make up the bolts for them. might even show them easy way to plumb a column

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Welding Projects

Special Offers: See the latest Miller deals and promotions.