Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Building a Tig Cooler

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    would the cooling coil out of an air conditioner work too?

    Comment


    • #17
      I used a new transmission oil cooler purchased from Advance Auto Parts and 2
      muffin fans, with a Procon pump and a 2 gallon stainless reservoir from a
      carbonator. I run a 50/50 distilled water and RV antifreeze mix in it and it's going on 2 years now, with no problems so far. My welder is a white face DialArc HF and I do a lot of aluminum with it, so I tend to run it at the higher currents a lot.

      You should not run higher than about 60 psi or you will have line rupture
      problems. Mine is set for 50 psi.

      Here is the link (with pictures)

      http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...p/t-18880.html.



      Charley
      ______________________________
      Miller MM252
      Miller Bobcat 225NT
      Miller DialArc HF & DIY Cooler
      2 Miller Digital Elite and 3 Fixed Shade Helmets
      2 O/A torch sets
      DeWalt 18 volt 1/2" Driver/Drill
      DeWalt 18 volt 6 1/2" Metal Saw
      DeWalt Porta Band & SWAG Offroad V3 Table
      Milwaukee 8" Dry Cut Saw
      Milwaukee 14" Dry Cut Chop Saw / Delta Stand
      Milwaukee 9" Grinder
      2 Milwaukee 4 1/2" Grinders
      Milwaukee Hole Hawg 1/2" Drill
      Wallace 5 Ton Gantry
      Too many hand tools

      Comment


      • #18
        I have tons of components to build a nice TIG cooler - Procon pump w/motor, heat exchanger, 8" muffin fan, S/S Reservoir, nice flow gauge, flow switch, temperature and pressure gauges, fittings, LOTS of relays, timers and electrical supplies.

        The original plan was to build a cooler for my Dynasty 200. I ended up buying a new Dynasty 350 with the cart and CoolMate unit. My cooler would have been better, but Miller's works fine.

        Anyway, if anyone is interested in the stuff let me know. I probably have $600-800 of cooler components sitting in the corner of the shop.

        Comment


        • #19
          That's a bit expensive for a DIY cooler. My cooler only cost me about $200 out of
          pocket. Of course, I don't have flow indicators, but I can watch the flow through the clear tubing.

          The Carbonator was $100 and I used the 2 gal stainless tank as well as the motor
          and pump. The oil cooler coil was about $40 from Advance Auto. The galv sheet
          metal, hose, and the pipe fittings from Lowes amounted to about $50. I already had
          the muffin fans. A gallon of RV antifreeze and a gallon of distilled water completed
          the purchases.

          Charley
          ______________________________
          Miller MM252
          Miller Bobcat 225NT
          Miller DialArc HF & DIY Cooler
          2 Miller Digital Elite and 3 Fixed Shade Helmets
          2 O/A torch sets
          DeWalt 18 volt 1/2" Driver/Drill
          DeWalt 18 volt 6 1/2" Metal Saw
          DeWalt Porta Band & SWAG Offroad V3 Table
          Milwaukee 8" Dry Cut Saw
          Milwaukee 14" Dry Cut Chop Saw / Delta Stand
          Milwaukee 9" Grinder
          2 Milwaukee 4 1/2" Grinders
          Milwaukee Hole Hawg 1/2" Drill
          Wallace 5 Ton Gantry
          Too many hand tools

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by CharleyL View Post
            That's a bit expensive for a DIY cooler. My cooler only cost me about $200 out of
            pocket. Of course, I don't have flow indicators, but I can watch the flow through the clear tubing.
            My plans called for the pump to be activated only when the pedal is depressed, and I have an adjustable time delay relay that would keep the pump running for a minute or so after the pedal is released.

            I have a temperature switch to control the fan, so it only comes on when the coolant starts to get hot. Also controlled by a time delay relay.

            A beeper alarm was going to be wired into the pressure and flow switch, to alert me in case there was a blockage or some issue with the pump.

            I have lighted gauges for the front panel to indicate coolant temperature and pressure, in addition to the flow meter.

            And the list goes on... This was NOT going to be your typical home-built cooler with a Tupperware tank and short sections of garden hose connecting everything.

            Comment


            • #21
              Has anyone used a counterflow plate heat exchanger and running hose water to cool the coolant? I brew beers and believe a small one could be had for around 75$. Then I would just need a motorized pump. The only downside would be wasted ground water unless a second pump was used.

              Comment


              • #22
                Tig Cooler

                Here is a cooler I built using a carbonizer.
                I keep the SS tank and added a fan to the motor shaft for cooling.
                I used quick disconnect fittings so I can disconnect the torch for storage of both.
                The radiator is from an auto AC unit with a shroud to aid cooling.
                Attached Files

                Comment

                Working...
                X