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Alum wheel repair for ryanjones2150, I still can't send messages.

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  • Alum wheel repair for ryanjones2150, I still can't send messages.

    I still would wiz wheel a 1/8" gap and cut the crack clear out even with a TIG weld. Just bevel the edges and clean it real good. Weld the tire (bead) side first and get a good weld. Then weld the inside last. I leave a small amount of weld on the backside and buff the tire edge smooth...
    Bob Wright

    Spool Gun conversion. How To Do It. Below.
    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...php?albumid=48

  • #2
    Hey Bob, thanks. Just looking for the black magic voodoo pitfalls in it. Nothing on the edges of the rim, just about dead center on the wheel. Guy said he hit a big rock or piece of concrete in the road. That's what he gets for riding around with those low profile tires I say. Planning to grind away the powder coating, maybe spray some sauce on there and find the crack ends, stop drill them, burr it out and zip it up with 4943.

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    • #3
      Wasting time drilling IMO. Window it (grind out huge) and when you heat it you will see instantly if it needs more grinding. I tried to use the stop drilling for awhile, and found the crack is always longer than you think, so run the arc all around your ground area before you add filler, to find crack trails.
      When you Keyhole at the end you will either get a clean puddle or it will be separated by the crack. That is the beauty of tig.

      Pre-heat is important if it is out in the middle. It should be hot on the complete opposite side of the wheel from the work. If you decide to skip pre-heat and it cracks, then you know you should have pre-heated. Sometimes you can get lucky.
      Hope you don't mind the highjack. If so, please ignore

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      Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
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      Miller Dynasty 280 with AC independent expansion card
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      Miller Bobcat 225 NT (what I began my present Biz with!)
      Miller 30-A Spoolgun
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      • #4
        Actually that sounds like very sound advice. The crack is on the middle of the wheel and I don't think it's very thick there anyway.

        How much preheat do you think is necessary? My friend does not plan to have this wheel re-powder coated since the repair won't really show unless you're looking for it.

        Thanks for the advice.

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        • #5
          Sorry been busy and I'm sure you're done by now.
          I like to make the entire wheel just hot enough to "fry" spit
          Not stupid hot.... like 250ish
          Then once you start welding it will keep the entire thing hot.
          In the winter I love to set it on the woodstove when I'm finished.
          It's not as technical as one might think. Just hot enough to expand the entire wheel, and to not localize all the heat in one area. Same with the cool down.
          If you get the whole part hot when welding then you would be ok normally as well.
          Wheels are big enough to give you troubles sometimes.

          www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
          Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
          MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
          Miller Dynasty 280 with AC independent expansion card
          Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

          Miller Bobcat 225 NT (what I began my present Biz with!)
          Miller 30-A Spoolgun
          Miller WC-115-A
          Miller Spectrum 300
          Miller 225 Thunderbolt (my first machine bought new 1980)
          Miller Digital Elite Titanium 9400

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          • #6
            Actually I haven't got to it yet. I've never used that spray due to trace cracks and was considering it as a little learning project as well. Didn't know if it will leave a residue that the cast aluminum will absorb and give me trouble later. The aluminum is powder coated and I'd prefer not to jack the coating in the face of the wheel up. Again, no clue how hot I can get that thing without causing problems. Recommendations on either of those issues?

            I'm so back logged it's making me mad. I need to hire a helper.

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            • #7
              The powder coat can take fairly high heat already, otherwise the brakes could get hot enough to cause problems. A couple of hundred degrees would help a bit IMO. As for the area around the weld.....tough. Shouldn't have broke it, etc.
              The junk they drag in for me to weld like that has caused me to be a spray can paint match expert !!
              If you can't weld it as good as you need to because of the coating then just pass on the job. A 100% root pass is everything IMO
              Wheels are cheaper than your deductable.
              BTW....I would pretty much do the same prep with MIG as well. I was a MIG aluminum guy before I was a TIG guy!

              www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
              Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
              MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
              Miller Dynasty 280 with AC independent expansion card
              Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

              Miller Bobcat 225 NT (what I began my present Biz with!)
              Miller 30-A Spoolgun
              Miller WC-115-A
              Miller Spectrum 300
              Miller 225 Thunderbolt (my first machine bought new 1980)
              Miller Digital Elite Titanium 9400

              Comment


              • #8
                As far as the spray goes....That is simply to determine if there IS a crack. You have to grind it out to the end. The instant you apply heat, if there is any remaining crack, you will see it. If you stop drill it, you will still grind beyond your hole, or at the very least bevel it 100% to get you weld in.
                Then you have to fuse all around the area to be welded and burn out all the junk. Like make a bead without rod all the way around. Then you will KNOW if the crack is still there.

                www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
                Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
                MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
                Miller Dynasty 280 with AC independent expansion card
                Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

                Miller Bobcat 225 NT (what I began my present Biz with!)
                Miller 30-A Spoolgun
                Miller WC-115-A
                Miller Spectrum 300
                Miller 225 Thunderbolt (my first machine bought new 1980)
                Miller Digital Elite Titanium 9400

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                • #9
                  Excellent advice, gracias amigo.

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                  • #10
                    Piece of cake. I was expecting the typical cast aluminum uphill fight. Windowed it out with a zip disc in my die grinder...looked like a spider web...cleaned it up, a little preheat, turned my balance down a little (70), freq 100, 3/32 tungsten and 4943, stuff wetted in fine, beads ran no problem, filled in the hole. All that and a can of nuts.

                    What was I worried about again?

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