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Adding Toro Side Skids to Honda Snow Blower

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  • Adding Toro Side Skids to Honda Snow Blower

    My brother, who in his prime was very handy with welding and fabricating, died of last year Parkinson's. Over Christmas vacation my sister in Law showed me a problem with their Honda snow blower, while we were visiting her in New Jersey.

    The snow blower is a super heavy duty Honda model with rubber tracks, which my brother had purchased in the snow country of Vermont. Their sidewalk is on a steep hill and they are required to clear the sidewalk along the street within 12 hours after the snow stops, because their house is right next to a middle school. To make matters worse there is a steep hill on the side of the sidewalk, so you have to blow the snow from the sidewalk level up about 12 feet to get it on top hill, because you can't blow it into the street. This snow blower can make it up the hill and throw the snow up on the hill with no problems. The problem was with the L shaped skids that were attached to the back of the 1/16" blower housing. The footprint on the housing was so small that the skids pulled out a chunk out of the housing and fell off and now the scraper blade on the bottom as well as part of the housing was worn away. A new housing was available but cost $1000. My sister in law thought that it would be more robust to have skids mounted to the edge of the snow blower instead the original design that oil canned on the back of the housing, and I agreed with her.

    My solution was to fabricate a retrofit kit to add skids to the sides of the blower. The problem was that I had to design the retrofit kit in Michigan, so that my sister in law could install it without welding in New Jersey. I selected Toro skids for the Honda snow blower, because they were 3/16" thick and were reversible so you could flip them 180 when the first side wore out. They were also readily available from any lawn equipment stores or on-line. Snow blowers that are designed for side skids usually have a flat surface to mount the skids. This snow blower had a bead around the bottom that was 5/32" high, so I designed a spacer to fill in the space so that the skid would sit flat.
    To get the shape right I took a picture of the side of the blower housing with a scale and imported it into SolidWorks. I drew the shape of the spacer by picking up the shape from the imported picture. I added a back up plate so that the front spacer and the back plate sandwiched the blower housing and spread the load over a very wide area. I attached the spacer on the outside to the backup plate on the inside with flat head screws, so that these plates would stay in place when the skid was adjusted. I made up the step by step procedure so that my sister in law could do the retrofit herself. I purchased the fasteners, metal, Loctite, drill bits and hex keys that were necessary for the retrofit and sent them to her along with the retrofit instructions. I sent it to her on Tuesday, which left her enough time to do the retrofit before the 20 to 24" blizzard hit on Saturday morning (January 30, 2016). As the snow fell on Saturday morning my sister in law finished the project. To mount the kit all my sister in law had to do was drill four holes on each side. It kind of reminded her of mission impossible, but she got it done and it worked great.

    I bring this to your attention in case you have problems with a snow blower that has the rear mounted skids. With welding you wouldn't need the backup plate or the screws that attached the outer spacer to the backup plate, so it would make it a simpler stronger design.

    Don
    Attached Files
    Miller Thunderbolt
    Smith Oxyacetylene Torch
    Miller Dynasty 200DX
    Lincoln SP-250 MIG Welder
    Clausing/Coldchester 15" Lathe
    16" DuAll Saw
    15" Drill Press
    7" x 9" Swivel Head Horizontal Band Saw
    20 Ton Arbor Press
    Bridgeport
    Miller Spectrum 375 Plasma Torch

  • #2
    Nice work on the long distance repair kit.---Meltedmetal

    Comment


    • #3
      No kidding...nice job.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by ryanjones2150 View Post
        No kidding...nice job.
        We made the trip from Michigan to New Jersey for the holidays to visit relatives. Attached are some pictures on the completed job. My sister in law did a good job. She told me that she actually enjoyed the challenge.

        Don
        Miller Thunderbolt
        Smith Oxyacetylene Torch
        Miller Dynasty 200DX
        Lincoln SP-250 MIG Welder
        Clausing/Coldchester 15" Lathe
        16" DuAll Saw
        15" Drill Press
        7" x 9" Swivel Head Horizontal Band Saw
        20 Ton Arbor Press
        Bridgeport
        Miller Spectrum 375 Plasma Torch

        Comment

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