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Helped a buddy learn a liitle MIG!

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  • #16
    New MIG Cart Project and Beer Bucket Stand

    I mentioned the cart I built for my new "Red" MIG unit, but I never showed you guys any pictures. Since I got the inspiration from you guys on this board, I thought I should share.

    And I added a couple of pics of the beer bucket stand I entered in the Miller Challenge, showing how it collapses.
    Attached Files

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    • #17
      nice work.
      do you have a twister or did you just do it in a vice with heat ??

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      • #18
        Just marked off a 4" section, tightened the piece in a vice at one mark, and heated and twisted the free section until the twist reached the other mark. Seemed simple at the time but is kind of hard to explain. It worked out well though, don't you think?

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        • #19
          Good job on the first projects. I've twisted flat by just clamping it in a vise and using a large Crescent wrench. It's pretty easy and adds a lot to the looks of an ornamental project.

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          • #20
            Just a quick tip.
            When I use old wheels for tool stands I weld an old rotor in them. Working for a large ambulance company I have easy access to damaged ambulance wheels and worn out rotors. Just set the rotor on a 2X4, set the wheel on it, slice the studs off flush with the wheel and weld the wheel to the stud stubs, kind of like a rosette. This more than doubles the weight and stability of the base.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by holsters View Post
              Just a quick tip.
              When I use old wheels for tool stands I weld an old rotor in them. Working for a large ambulance company I have easy access to damaged ambulance wheels and worn out rotors. Just set the rotor on a 2X4, set the wheel on it, slice the studs off flush with the wheel and weld the wheel to the stud stubs, kind of like a rosette. This more than doubles the weight and stability of the base.
              Have no idea what rotor you're referring to. Could you post a photo, pertaining to your method of modifying? Thanks.

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              • #22
                Goodhand,

                Sorry for the confusion. I was talking about front front brake rotors. We use F350 and E350 ambulances, the cast iron rotors are monsters. They weigh about twice what the wheel weighs. I'll try to make the time to snap a few photos, but the method is quite simple.

                Set the rotor on a couple of short 2X4s, set the wheel on it (just like you were going to bolt the wheel on the truck), torch off the studs flush with the wheel and "rosette" weld the wheel to the studs.

                There is an inner "rim" that fits flush with the in the inner hole of the wheel, but this rim is cast iron. I don't recommend trying to weld the wheel to this rim.

                After welding, the rotor sits about an inch off of the floor, under the wheel and doesn't interfere with the foot print of the wheel. It makes a very heavy and stable base. I have to use a small moving dolly to move them around the shop.

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