Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

TIG'n cast aluminum parts

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • TIG'n cast aluminum parts

    Had a cast aluminum engine part, a timing chain cover, to weld up yesterday. These cast aluminum pieces are always interesting to weld on, sometimes it is good, sometimes not so good....

    Syncrowave 200, 175 amps, balance 7.3, straight argon @ 17cfh, 2% Lanthanated tungsten (sharp tip), 4043 filler

    damaged area


    a hole worn through the casting allowing water into the engine oil


    welded up

  • #2
    Looks really good did the oil residue from the other side give you any trouble.
    .
    Miller Bobcat 225NT onan
    Millermatic 211
    Spoolmate 100
    (Retapped to fit regular mig tips)
    Work better & less parts to stock.
    Miller 130xp
    T/A Dragster 85 (portability 11 pounds)
    Oxygen/Acetylene torch set 50'
    2. 4-1/2" grinders
    1. 9" grinder
    14" Makita chop saw
    1/2" Aircat impact gun 900#

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by eecervantes83 View Post
      Looks really good did the oil residue from the other side give you any trouble.

      Thanks, yeah I had to run a couple of beads and then grind them out because of the oil pulled into the weld...but that is pretty much normal for parts like this.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Goat Driver View Post
        Thanks, yeah I had to run a couple of beads and then grind them out because of the oil pulled into the weld...but that is pretty much normal for parts like this.
        Nice Work..!!

        Have had to do similar weld repairs on the front cover of Toyota 22RE engines where the timing chain tensioners wear out and the sloppy chain saws it's way into the water pump cavity...
        .

        *******************************************
        The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

        “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

        Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

        My Blue Stuff:
        Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
        Dynasty 200DX
        Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
        Millermatic 200

        TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by H80N View Post
          Nice Work..!!

          Have had to do similar weld repairs on the front cover of Toyota 22RE engines where the timing chain tensioners wear out and the sloppy chain saws it's way into the water pump cavity...

          Thanks!

          I had to weld up a 22R timing cover just a few weeks ago, it was in worse shape than this one. forgot to take pics of that one.

          Comment


          • #6
            Goat Driver, Next time, Clean it up good like you have done, dont ve-groove it as much as you did and go over the crack with the torch minus any filler metal at a few less amps than what you would weld it at.
            Doing so will bring the contamination to the top and grind the crude off the top and repeat this procedure until you pull most of the contamination out of the part, the reason I say not to ve-groove it all the way at the beginning is every time you clean the crude off you will ve-groove it automatically, if you ve-groove it at the beginning you wont have material at the end.

            After you clean it you are now ready to weld.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Portable Welder View Post
              Goat Driver, Next time, Clean it up good like you have done, dont ve-groove it as much as you did and go over the crack with the torch minus any filler metal at a few less amps than what you would weld it at.
              Doing so will bring the contamination to the top and grind the crude off the top and repeat this procedure until you pull most of the contamination out of the part, the reason I say not to ve-groove it all the way at the beginning is every time you clean the crude off you will ve-groove it automatically, if you ve-groove it at the beginning you wont have material at the end.

              After you clean it you are now ready to weld.

              That has not been V-grooved...that's where the timing chain wore into the aluminum.

              Comment


              • #8
                Chain-Saw...

                Originally posted by Goat Driver View Post
                That has not been V-grooved...that's where the timing chain wore into the aluminum.
                A sloppy timing chain WILL cut a very neat trough into cast aluminum covers...

                like a chainsaw through wood...

                have seen it many times...
                .

                *******************************************
                The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

                “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

                Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

                My Blue Stuff:
                Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
                Dynasty 200DX
                Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
                Millermatic 200

                TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

                Comment


                • #9
                  Goat Driver, Next time, Clean it up good like you have done, dont ve-groove it as much as you did and go over the crack with the torch minus any filler metal at a few less amps than what you would weld it at.
                  Doing so will bring the contamination to the top and grind the crude off the top and repeat this procedure until you pull most of the contamination out of the part, the reason I say not to ve-groove it all the way at the beginning is every time you clean the crude off you will ve-groove it automatically, if you ve-groove it at the beginning you wont have material at the end.

                  After you clean it you are now ready to weld.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Rafe welding & Supplies View Post
                    Goat Driver, Next time, Clean it up good like you have done, dont ve-groove it as much as you did and go over the crack with the torch minus any filler metal at a few less amps than what you would weld it at.
                    Doing so will bring the contamination to the top and grind the crude off the top and repeat this procedure until you pull most of the contamination out of the part, the reason I say not to ve-groove it all the way at the beginning is every time you clean the crude off you will ve-groove it automatically, if you ve-groove it at the beginning you wont have material at the end.

                    After you clean it you are now ready to weld.
                    PLS reread the posts..... He did NOT vee it out.... the sloppy timing chain did.......
                    .

                    *******************************************
                    The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

                    “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

                    Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

                    My Blue Stuff:
                    Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
                    Dynasty 200DX
                    Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
                    Millermatic 200

                    TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Ever since you got me hooked up with that sample of 4943, that's what I've used on my cast aluminum repairs. Haven't had a repair like this, but seems pretty straight forward. Certainly better than something busted clean off or even repairing cracks that run this way and that.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Yup, I used 4943 on a cast aluminum handle a week or 2 ago. A fridge handle, thing gets janked on all day long. Still holding to this day, there is something magic about the 4943 stuff.
                        if there's a welder, there's a way

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Goat Driver View Post


                          Thanks!

                          I had to weld up a 22R timing cover just a few weeks ago, it was in worse shape than this one. forgot to take pics of that one.
                          There was a time when we would have one of those 22R series engines in the shop once a week with a hole in the timing cover. I guess Toyota was trying to save money when the went with the single row chain in '83. Always amazed me that people would keep driving with all that chain slap noises.


                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Looks great!

                            Can you guys tell me more about the 4943?

                            I have been bouncing back and forth between 4340 and 5356. I use 4043 on oil pans as it's supposed to take the heat and 5356 on turbo piping bits.

                            As a side note, we have this stuff here called "Formula 88". It's a great degreaser and is "supposed" to be biodegradable. I soak the pans in 100% solution for a couple hours and it comes out looking brand new. Some oil always seems to stay in the casting, but that stuff is a night and day difference for welding - takes nearly no elbow grease at all, but you have to have the time to soak it.
                            J.Caraher
                            Wide Open Throttle Technologies (WOT-Tech), Pompano Beach FL
                            Miller Sync 300,Hobart 190
                            RogueFab pneumatic, Hossfeld Manual
                            Kitamura CNC, Bridgeport 2j
                            TunerPRO, HPTuners, AEM, Megasquirt, DynoJet
                            NASA Racing Official/Driver

                            YouTube Link, Instagram Link, FaceBook Link

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Where is "here"?<br />
                              <br />
                              To me, it seems like 4943 wets in better on the cast jobs and it flows nicely. There was a good forum post about it a while back. The Hobart aluminum guru got on there and laid it all out for us. He even called my LWS to let them know it's available and how to order it. I don't know if they're still sending out samples of the stuff anymore though. <br />
                              <br />
                              I enjoy using the stuff and I very rarely know what grade of aluminum I'm working with. Most repair work and fabbercobbled stuff with whatever I can get my hands on at the scrap yard. Total Roadkill stuff.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X